Results for 'H. B. Lu'

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  1.  19
    Morphology and Orientation of Iron Oxide Precipitates in Epitaxial BiFeO3thin Films Grown Under Two Non-Optimized Oxygen Pressures.X. Wang, Y. L. Zhu, S. B. Mi, C. Wang, H. B. Lu & X. L. Ma - 2010 - Philosophical Magazine 90 (34):4551-4567.
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  2.  7
    Correlation Between the Wear Resistance of Cu-Ni Alloy and its Electron Work Function.X. C. Huang, H. Lu, H. B. He, X. G. Yan & D. Y. Li - 2015 - Philosophical Magazine 95 (34):3896-3909.
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  3.  7
    Viscoelastic Effects During Depth-Sensing Indentation of Cortical Bone Tissues.B. Tang, A. H. W. Ngan & W. W. Lu - 2006 - Philosophical Magazine 86 (33-35):5653-5666.
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  4.  5
    Multiscale Simulation From Atomistic to ContinuumCoupling Molecular Dynamics with the Material Point Method.H. Lu, N. P. Daphalapurkar, B. Wang, S. Roy & R. Komanduri - 2006 - Philosophical Magazine 86 (20):2971-2994.
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  5.  4
    Bilder Griechischer Vasen, Heft 4: Der Pan-Maler. By J. D. Beazley. Pp. 28; 32 Plates. Berlin: H. Keller, 1931.B. W. H. - 1932 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 52 (1):140-140.
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  6.  42
    The Loeb Collection of Arretine Pottery. Catalogued with Introduction and Descriptive Notes by George H. Chase, Ph.D. New York, 1908. Pp. 167. 23 Plates[REVIEW]B. W. H. - 1909 - The Classical Review 23 (2):57-57.
  7.  37
    Mycenaean Troy. By H. C. Tolman and G. C. Scoggin (Vanderbilt Oriental Series). With Plate, 44 Figs., Four Maps, and Plans. Pp. 111. 8vo. New York, Etc. [1903]. [REVIEW]B. W. H. - 1904 - The Classical Review 18 (08):424-.
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  8.  3
    Mycenaean Troy. By H. C. Tolman and G. C. Scoggin . With Plate, 44 Figs., Four Maps, and Plans. Pp. 111. 8vo. New York, Etc. [1903]. [REVIEW]B. W. H. - 1904 - The Classical Review 18 (8):424-424.
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  9.  86
    Metaphysics. An Introduction to Philosophy[REVIEW]B. H. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (4):750-750.
    This is a useful addition to the metaphysical library. It is written from the optimistic view that metaphysics stands on the verge of a new age of (...)
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  10.  61
    Fundamental Problems of Marxism[REVIEW]B. H. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):352-353.
    This is a new translation of one of Plekhanov's major works on historical materialism. It is based on the Russian edition of the Institute of Philosophy (...)of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR, edited by V. A. Fomina. The appendix contains two valuable additional essays by Plekhanov: The Materialist Conception of History and The Role of the Individual in History, both of which are reprints with some minor revisions of translations of 1940. Plekhanov's footnotes are given on the page and explanatory notes by the editor have been added in the back of the book. Plekhanov is generally credited with having been the first to apply the term "dialectical materialism" to the philosophical materialism of Marx and Engels. In the opinion of many non-Marxist and some Marxist scholars, this was the crucial initial step in the elaboration of a deviationist doctrine which not only departed from Marx's and Engels' original thought, but which eventually overshadowed it. Plekhanov, in this view, served as the link between Engels and Lenin in which a tendency in Engels toward a mechanistic materialism, manifested in his Anti-Dühring and The Dialectics of Nature, was developed into a dominant theme. Dialectical materialism became the term applicable to the science of the laws of motion of man, society, and nature--of all reality. Historical materialism, or, as Marx and Engels called it, the materialist conception of history, became but a subordinate branch of dialectical materialism, dealing specifically with the laws of motion of man and society. It became a philosophy of history derived from a broader philosophy of nature, or of the cosmos. Reality became an autonomous existent--independent of the human species. And epistemology became a copy theory of man's never-ending and never-achieved struggle to know and reflect that which pre-exists outside of him. Regrettably, the introduction by the editor ignores these evaluations and interpretations and sticks to the more traditional Marxist areas of discussing Plekhanov's masterful refutation of economic determinism, his exaggeration of the importance of geographic conditions, and Lenin's criticisms of his theoretical weaknesses. Plekhanov's treatment of the materialist conception of history still stands as one of the most brilliant and coherent presentations of this seminal doctrine. It is a pity and a historical deprivation that he became so preoccupied with the polemics of the day as to never sit down to write a systematic exposition of Marxism.--H. B. (shrink)
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  11.  38
    The New Marxism[REVIEW]B. H. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (1):128-128.
    De George undertakes the formidable task of compressing within 154 pages of text a description and critical analysis of the changes which have taken place in Marxist (...)
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  12.  30
    Ideas of History, 2 Vols[REVIEW]B. H. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (1):146-146.
    This presentation uses the by-now customary division of philosophy of history into speculative and critical philosophy, devoting a volume to each. The text is mainly excerpts (...)from the philosophers under study, with brief interpretative comments preceding the text and selected bibliographies following. The excerpts are generally well chosen and can be read with profit by those seeking an introduction to philosophy of history, as well as by more advanced students. The interpretations in a number of cases suffer from one-sidedness, especially in the cases of Hegel and Marx. There are also some careless errors, the most glaring being the switching of the meaning of the German terms, Historie and Geschichte. The speculative philosophies of history are excerpted from Augustine, Vico, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Spengler, and Toynbee. There is also an interesting excerpt from Herder. The critical philosophies of history consist of selections from Comte, Mill, Dilthey, Collingwood, Walsh, Hempel, Dray, Mandelbaum, Weingartner, Beard, Becker, Nagel, Aron, Hook and Berlin. The inclusion of such a diversified and conflicting group of philosophies under the common heading of "critical philosophy" makes for an uneasy and tight fit. The final essay in Volume II is by Georges Florovsky, "The Study of the Past" and it appears in a chapter entitled "Conclusion"--all of which is a little puzzling, since Florovsky is presenting a theology of history as distinct from a philosophy of history.--H. B. (shrink)
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  13.  11
    History and Class Consciousness: Studies in Marxist Dialectics[REVIEW]B. H. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (1):129-130.
    At long last, this seminal work is available in English. Originally published in German in 1923, it became almost immediately a center of interest and stormy controversy (...)
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  14.  22
    El Joven Hegel y Los Problemas de la Sociedad Capitalista[REVIEW]B. H. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (1):129-129.
    Spanish readers are fortunate in having a publishing house which is committed to reproduce in Spanish the complete works of Georg Lukács. The complete edition will consist (...)
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  15.  22
    Marshall, Marx and Modern Times[REVIEW]B. H. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (4):744-745.
    This text was originally delivered as the Marshall Lectures in Cambridge in 1967-1968 and one would expect that Alfred Marshall, the great economist of the liberal (...)tradition, would come off the better in comparison with Karl Marx. The expectation is not disappointed, but in the end Kerr finds both Marshall and Marx equally irrelevant to the problems of the contemporary world. The liberalism and socialism which helped shape the modern world now stand historically exhausted. The formative influence in the world is no longer the struggle between classes or between socialism and capitalism. The struggle now is within one pluralistic world, whose industrial nature embraces the socialist as well as the capitalist sectors. The nature of the struggle is no longer for the possession of property, but for power--power to set the rules, fix the rewards, and influence the style of life. Those who engage in the struggle are not economic classes, but social groups and individuals. There is a challenge to the whole society, but by its very nature it cannot succeed. The challenge comes from the under-class and from the outer-class. All other elements, including the workers, the managers, leaders, white-collar employees and self-employed, make up the inner-class and conduct the struggle for power within the framework of acceptance of the existing social order. The two points to emphasize here are that the under-class and outer-class do not have the combined strength to win out, except with the support of some dominant groups of the inner-class--a fairly hopeless prospect. Secondly, no group can win conclusively, since authority in a highly industrialized society can never be held equally by all, or entirely by one. We can only conclude from Kerr's exposition that mankind is forever stuck with what Hegel called a "bad infinity." Post-capitalism and post-socialism have no place to go and a new "end of history" has been attained. Kerr concludes wistfully that we "can only envy the optimism of Marx and Marshall that surround their views of the evolution of the working class."--H. B. (shrink)
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  16.  22
    The Marxian Revolutionary Idea[REVIEW]B. H. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):358-358.
    In his first book on Marx, Philosophy and Myth in Karl Marx, published in 1961, Tucker developed three main themes: Marx's philosophy is deeply rooted in (...)the traditions of German philosophy from Kant to the neo-Hegelians; there is a fundamental continuity between the thought of the young Marx of the Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts and the mature Marx of the Critique of Political Economy and Das Kapital; the missing clue for a full understanding of Marx, particularly of the apparently contradictory presence of strong moral overtones in Marx's writings and the absence of any supporting philosophy of ethics, is that Marx was basically a utopian religious moralist with an eschatology that envisaged the redemption of man. These three themes are briefly and forcefully restated in the present book without change or qualification and serve as the springboard for extending Tucker's interpretation of Marx and Engels into new areas. The reference to Marx and Engels introduces another element common to both works. Unlike most non-Marxist scholars, Tucker treats Marx and Engels as harmonious collaborators in the fashioning of a single doctrine. The first hundred pages are studded with references to the joint views of both men and their differences in belief are mentioned perfunctorily. Six of the seven chapters in the book have appeared previously as individual essays. The new chapter is on the relevance of Marxism to the modernization theories of the contemporary social sciences. Two other chapters examine Marx and Engels' position on distributive justice and on the state and politics. The latter half of the book takes up Marxism as an ideology of revolutionary movements, with special stress on the appeal of Marxism to the intelligentsia of under-developed countries and on the theoretical contributions of Lenin, Stalin, and Mao tse-Tung. The sixth chapter is on the de-radicalization of Marxism in the USSR and the final chapter finds an enduring value in Marx's utopian "futurology" of a transformed mature humanity living in a transformed world.--H. B. (shrink)
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  17.  21
    Problemas de la Historia de Las Ideas Filosoficas En la Argentina[REVIEW]B. H. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 22 (4):746-746.
    Coriolano Alberini was an outstanding philosopher of history in Argentina and a major influence on his country's philosophical thought. A keen student of Kant and Herder, (...)a vigorous opponent of positivism, and a strong admirer of Bergson and Ortega y Gasset, Alberini's distinctive feature was an approach to history which stressed action over speculation. His passion was to promote the development of Argentina's national independence and a genuine national culture. The present volume of his writings was compiled and edited posthumously. The titles of the seven essays show Alberini's absorption with the shaping of his national culture and the preponderant influence on it of European ideas. Of special interest are his articles on the idea of progress in Argentine philosophy, and the influence on Argentine culture of French, German, and English thought. The piece on German influence is published in Spanish for the first time in this volume. In English the titles of the essays are as follows: The Metaphysics of Alberdi; German Philosophy in Argentina; French Thought in Argentine Culture; English Philosophic Thought in Argentina; The Idea of Progress in Argentine Philosophy; Philosophy and International Relations; Genesis and Evolution of Argentine Philosophic Thought; Philosophic Culture in Argentina.--H. B. (shrink)
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  18.  21
    Some Lessons in Metaphysics[REVIEW]B. H. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (4):746-747.
    This book represents the text used by Ortega for presentation of his lecture course on metaphysics at the University of Madrid in 1932-1933. Stylistically, the manuscript (...)is illustrative of his pedagogical method, rather than his method of philosophical exposition. In its own way it demonstrates how the literal transcription of what is effective orally can become in written form tiresomely repetitious and frustratingly slow in development. The thesis of the lectures is that metaphysics is implicit in man's basic orientation toward life. Orientation implies a previous state of disorientation. The authentic self is aware of the need for orientation and makes the move consciously. Ingredient in the consciousness of the authentic self is an awareness of self as solitary and alone, thrown into a chaotic and hostile world in which it must unendingly make its life by what it does. The unauthentic self, on the other hand, lives a fictitious existence, accepting sociality as the basis of existence and therefore uncritically accepting the social and cultural norms of the times. The unauthentic self is always oriented, but falsely so, since it does not find its own way to its orientation. At the end of the lectures, Ortega seems close to the point of merging the authentic and unauthentic "I's" into one self, although he never quite gets there. But whether the two "I's" retain their categorial separateness or whether they are transformed into two modes of being of the same self, the same question remains: On what grounds is public life less authentic than private life, and the external less real than the internal? Further, the asocial, solitary "I" which must think through its orientation in solitude, i.e., independently of society, must use the most social of all tools to carry through its project, namely, language. The last three lectures contain a brief evaluation of idealism and realism and the inadequacies of both doctrines in explaining reality.--H. B. (shrink)
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  19.  20
    Lukács[REVIEW]B. H. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (2):341-341.
    Until 1969, there was only one book in English on Georg Lukács, Victor Zitta's Georg Lukács' Marxism: Alienation, Dialectics, Revolution. A Study in Utopia and Ideology, (...)published in 1964 by Martinus Nijhoff. In early 1970, Georg Lukács: The Man, His Work, and His Ideas, edited by G. H. R. Parkinson, was published in London by Weidenfeld and Nicolson. Now, we have Lichtheim's addition to what promises to be a growing body of literature in English on this many-sided and controversial philosopher. Although Lichtheim expresses some reservations about Zitta's treatment of Lukács, his own work belongs to the same genre in two essential respects: first, it is fundamentally hostile to Lukács, and second, it lapses into many ad hominem arguments which reflect this hostility. Thus, also, the book is sparing in its acknowledgment of Lukács' originality and unsparing in its criticism of his acceptance of any aspect of Leninism as distinct from Marxism. The stated aim of the book is a critical examination of Lukács' theory of aesthetics. In Lukács' case, this requires coming to grips with his views on history, politics, society, and epistemology. Over half of the book is devoted to the latter subjects. The picture of Lukács which emerges is that of an academician, physically divorced from, and without roots in the working class whose cause he espouses. His historical importance is attributed to his recapture of the Hegelian dimension of Marx and his error is his over-extension of the Hegelian aspect to the point where authentic Marxism is submerged in a Hegelianized version of it. Aside from the historical inaccuracy of presenting Lukács as an academician, isolated from the practical sides of daily life, Lichtheim misses the revolutionary essence of Lukács' thought which led him to abandon the comfortable and secure life of a dissident banker's son for the uncertainties and hardships of the life of the revolutionary. The influences of Plato and Dilthey are given undue emphasis in Lukács' thought and a disproportionate part of the book is given over to expounding on this subject. This is a small book about a big philosopher. Most of such books do not satisfy and the present one is no exception.--H. B. (shrink)
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  20.  20
    Philosophy of World Revolution[REVIEW]B. H. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (3):561-562.
    This slim volume by an Austrian Marxist attempts two major types of correction to contemporary Marxism. One is an historical correction which seeks to restore what was (...)
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  21.  20
    The Presuppositions of Critical History[REVIEW]B. H. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (2):336-337.
    Bradley's essay, first published in 1874, is considered the earliest significant application of British idealism to philosophy of history and an exemplar of Anglo-American analytical philosophy (...) of history. The editor of the present edition goes much further. He credits Bradley with being one of the chief sources of the twentieth-century idea of history and more particularly, of Collingwood's expression of that idea. Rubinoff makes out a good case for the identity between Collingwood and Bradley. Collingwood's concept of history as the re-enactment of past thought has its counterpart in Bradley's "identification of consciousness," and Collingwood's idea of history as an attempt to organize the thought of the past into a dynamically developing scale of forms parallels Bradley's theory of reality as a concrete universal which appears in finite centers. Bradley evidently had no knowledge of Dilthey, yet his reactions to history were essentially the same. Both viewed history as an autonomous discipline requiring its own methodology, and both rejected the "dehumanized" approach of positivism, on the one hand, and the relativism and skepticism of primitive historicism on the other hand. Similarly, both had recourse to the concept of re-experience of past experience by the historian. The line from Bradley to Collingwood is clear enough. What seems cloudy is Rubinoff's claim that Dilthey lapsed back into positivism by presupposing the uniformity of human nature as the ground for understanding self and others, while Bradley escaped this lapse by making the historian the criterion of historical knowledge. It seems more accurate to describe Dilthey's concept as the continuity of human nature, not its uniformity. Uniformity would suggest that primitive man could understand modern society. Dilthey could hardly have been suggesting such a possibility! And, clearly, Bradley's concept of the historian as criterion of historical knowledge is only comprehensible within the framework of the continuity of human nature.--H. B. (shrink)
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  22.  18
    A Contemporary Approach to Classical Metaphysics[REVIEW]B. H. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (4):749-749.
    This is an undergraduate text which limits itself to consideration of metaphysics from the standpoint of the essence and existence of being. Insight into the notion of (...)
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  23.  18
    The Notebooks[REVIEW]B. H. - 1962 - Review of Metaphysics 15 (4):674-674.
    This is the second installment of Miss Coburn's great edition of Coleridge's notebooks, and covers the years 1804-1808. As before, the text and Miss Coburn' (...)s invaluable notes are bound separately. The Notebooks cannot be reviewed, and can scarcely be described. Anyone interested in Coleridge as poet, critic, theologian, speculative thinker will find a universe in this astonishing collection of an incredibly comprehensive mind's very substance.--H. B. (shrink)
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  24.  18
    The Theory of Knowledge of Giambattista Vico[REVIEW]B. H. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (2):341-342.
    The modern reinterpretations of Vico are a good example of the rethinking by historians of one age of the rethinking by historians of previous ages of the (...)
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  25.  17
    The Categories of Dialectical Materialism[REVIEW]B. H. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 22 (4):761-762.
    This volume is a translation from the French original which appeared in 1965. It is a concise and critical examination of Soviet philosophical thought since the death (...)
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  26.  16
    Three Argentine Thinkers[REVIEW]B. H. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):349-350.
    This volume is a welcome, exciting, and unusually informative addition to what now seems a definite trend toward introducing Latin-American philosophers to the English-reading world. The (...) preface contains a brief review of milestones in this development, which the interested reader will find handy as reference. The principal features common to post-revolutionary Latin-American intellectual history are very present in Lipp's examination of Argentine thought; namely, the dedication to some principle of activism, the search for an authentic national character, a national ethos fashioned in the crucible of European traditions and the specific conditions confronting the new nations, the linkage of philosophy to the economic, social, and political conditions of the time and the rejection of abstract speculative philosophy as inconsistent with, and alien to, the needs of the struggling young societies. Lipp's chosen area is the study of twentieth-century Argentine intellectual development as seen through the prewar period of positivism, the postwar reaction against positivism, and the contemporary period. Each period is studied by examining the work of an outstanding Argentine philosopher: positivism and naturalism through Jose Ingenieros, the ethics of human freedom and personalism through Alejandro Korn, and transcendentalist anthropology through the works of Francisco Romero. There is something fresh and appealing in the philosophical expressions of these youthful, undeveloped, or under-developed societies which should find responsive echoes among student youth in this country. Ingenieros' book, The Mediocre Man, inspired generations of Latin-American students to revolt and reform the universities and their respective societies. Korn's strongly ethical views led him to sympathize openly with student revolt and to oppose the divorcing of philosophy from historic reality. Romero put his life where his philosophy was and went to jail for his opposition to Peron. Romero's dream of a humanized transformation of society and Korn's view of man as a "rebellious animal" who strives for human freedom through rebellion and creativity are but two sparks of the book's vitality that recommend it to the English-speaking reader.--H. B. (shrink)
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  27.  13
    Between Philosophy and History. The Resurrection of Speculative Philosophy of History Within the Analytic Tradition[REVIEW]B. H. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (2):339-339.
    Analytical philosophy abounds in tours de force [[sic]], but these are usually directed against other genres of philosophy, particularly the brand which passes under the various titles (...)
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  28.  13
    Economía Política y Lucha Social[REVIEW]B. H. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (3):533-533.
    This book is a rare piece of writing in any language. Its first merit is that it puts in 360-odd pages a concise and highly readable (...)history of economic thought from Ricardo and Adam Smith to modern times as seen through the critical spectacles of classical Marxist political economy. Its second merit is that it does not dismiss capitalist economics as mere apologetics or mystification, but--in the genuine spirit of Marx's principles of criticism--it also seeks out the positive aspects of methodology and understanding which can help clarify the workings and malfunctions of late twentieth century capitalism. Nor does the author bow before any mystic infallibility of current Soviet economic theory. Among the most interesting treatments are those of the theories of Böhm-Bawerk, Schumpeter, Marshall, Veblen, Hobson, Hilferding, Kalecki, Keynes, Harrod-Domar, Kaldor, Sraffa, Galbraith, Myrdal, Strachey, and Bettelheim. Aguilar is a professor of economics at the University of Mexico and displays impressive scholarship and perception in his chosen field. His call is for Latin American intellectuals to free themselves from the restrictions of the economic theories of capitalist economics and to dedicate themselves to the development of the theoretical foundations necessary for the liberation of Latin America not only from economic domination, but also from the cultural, social, and political tutelage of their economic masters. Marx's model of capitalism and Lenin's model of imperialism have not lost their power in Latin America as grounds for explaining the continued economic, cultural, social, and political backwardness of this huge area. The present work demonstrates the intellectual sweep of this power. The book is well-footnoted, but, deplorably, lacks an index.--H. B. (shrink)
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  29.  11
    Studies in Philosophy and in the History of Science: Essays in Honor of Max Fisch[REVIEW]B. H. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):765-766.
    Festschriften may have gone out of style, but not out of print. The desire to pay tribute to an important thinker remains strong and no one has (...)
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  30.  10
    Marx and the Intellectuals[REVIEW]B. H. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (1):136-137.
    This is a collection of essays, all of which have appeared earlier as individual pieces. What they have in common is a relentless effort to "demythologize" Marx (...)
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  31.  9
    Hegel in Berichten Seiner Zeitgenossen[REVIEW]B. H. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):762-763.
    This volume starts where the four-volume work by Johannes Hoffmeister, Briefe von und an Hegel, left off. It consists of excerpts from letters, diaries, memoirs, newspaper (...)and journal articles, etc., much of which has never been published before. What emerges is a conflicting picture of Hegel, the man--from which the reader can take his choice. The comments are from contemporaries: relatives, friends, acquaintances, students, colleagues, admirers, critics, and last, but not least, enemies. The chapters are organized chronologically by city of residence, beginning with Stuttgart, 1770-1788, and covering the periods in Tübingen, Bern, Frankfurt, Jena, Bamberg, Nürnberg, Heidelberg, and Berlin. There is a special chapter on the period immediately following Hegel's death, and a final chapter on After-Effects. The biggest chapter by far is the one on the Berlin period, which spans the longest space of time and also covers the time when Hegel's fame had reached its zenith. All told there are 769 excerpts from the pens of such varied personalities as Karl, Christiane, and Marie Hegel, Hölderlin, Goethe, Schelling, Karl Rosenkranz, Eduard Zeller, Fichte, Schleiermacher, Schiller, Schlegel, Brentano, Savigny, Michelet, Schopenhauer, Victor Cousin, Heine, Feuerbach, Bouterwek, Varnhagen v. Ense, K. F. Zeller, Arnold Ruge, Ranke, Eduard Gans, and many others. This book will undoubtedly figure prominently in future biographies of Hegel. However, it is not only for the Hegel specialist. Those who are interested in that specific period of German culture and those who simply enjoy anecdotal historical commentary will find much of interest and amusement here.--H. B. (shrink)
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  32.  7
    Giambattista Vico: An International Symposium[REVIEW]B. H. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):762-762.
    It may be an exaggeration to claim the twentieth century as Vico's, but the present volume attests that Vico's thought "is alive and doing well." Thirty (...)-nine scholars from Italy, England, France, Germany, the United States, and Australia submitted original essays for the occasion, and the editor furnished not only an essay, but also a preface and an epilogue. The essays are divided into four groups: Comparative Historical Studies; Vico's Influence on Western Thought and Letters; Vico and Contemporary Social and Humanist Thinking; Vico and Modern Philosophy, Pedagogy, and Aesthetics. With a few notable exceptions, the main effort is to show the pervasive influence of Vichian concepts in the modern world. If this does not always come off, there remains the striking parallelism of Vico's thinking with modern streams in such varied fields of the social sciences as philosophy of history, linguistics, epistemology, phenomenology, existentialism, Gestalt psychology, sociology, cultural, philosophical, and structural anthropology, and, of course, the anti-Cartesian stance of much of contemporary philosophy. Space does not permit the listing of the individual contributors and the titles of their essays. Suffice it say that they constitute a useful beginning for the interpretation of modern thought in terms of Vichian origins and for the reinterpretation of Vico's thought in terms of contemporary extensions of basically similar views. The volume also contains a four-and-a-half page bibliography of works on Vico in English. Regrettably, there is no listing of translations into English of Vico's own works. Even more regrettable is the omission of works on Vico in any other language--a sad capitulation to the provincialism and chauvinism which sometimes passes as American scholarship.--H. B. (shrink)
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  33.  7
    Marx's Theory of Alienation[REVIEW]B. H. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):750-751.
    Marxists tend to write not only with conviction, but with passion, flowing from an active commitment to the emancipation of mankind. In the hands of a dogmatist, (...)
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  34.  7
    Philosophy of History: An Introduction[REVIEW]B. H. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (1):140-140.
    The emphasis in this approach to philosophy of history is on the system philosophers. The emphasis itself follows from the theme of the book, which is that (...)
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  35.  7
    Vasconcelos of Mexico: Philosopher and Prophet[REVIEW]B. H. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (1):130-131.
    Compared to philosophers, the leading Latin American novelists, poets, and playwrights are relatively well known in the United States and many of their works are available in (...)
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  36.  6
    Georg Lukács: The Man, His Work, and His Ideas[REVIEW]B. H. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (2):350-351.
    There are few books in any language which attempt to survey the whole range of Lukács' work. English readers may, therefore, consider themselves fortunate to have available (...)
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  37.  6
    Wilhelm Dilthey's Philosophy of Historical Understanding: A Critical Analysis[REVIEW]B. H. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (2):347-348.
    Although Dilthey is increasingly recognized as a seminal philosopher whose thought finds significant expression in the works of Heidegger, Husserl, Jaspers, Mannheim, Weber, Spranger, Simmel, Troeltsch, and (...)
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  38.  6
    Beiträge zur Geschichte der byzantinischen Finanzverwaltung besonders des 10 und 11 Jahrhunderts. By Franz Dölger. Pp. iv + 160; 1 plate. Leipzig and Berlin: B. G. Teubner, 1927. 10 M[REVIEW]I. B. H. - 1928 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 48 (1):114-116.
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  39.  4
    Handbuch der Altertumswissenschaft . Palaeographie. Erster Teil: Griechische Palaeographie. By W. Schubart. Pp. viii + 184, with 120 facsimiles. Munich: C. H. Beck, 1925[REVIEW]I. B. H. - 1929 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 49 (1):127-129.
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  40.  13
    Prehistoric Thessaly. By A. J. B. Wace and M. S. Thompson. Pp. Xv + 272. With 6 Plates and 151 Illustrations in the Text. Cambridge University Press, 1912. 18s[REVIEW]H. H., A. J. B. Wace & M. S. Thompson - 1912 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 32:197-197.
  41.  36
    A Short History of Antioch, 300 B. C. -- A. D. 1268.N. H. B. & E. S. Bouchier - 1921 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 41:295.
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  42.  35
    H Ilias Kai o Trwikos PolemosThe Iliad of Homer.C. R. H., B. Dousmanis & William Marris - 1935 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 55:104.
  43.  17
    A Bibliography of the Works of J. B. BuryExcavations at Olynthus. I. The Neolithic Settlement.W. A. H., N. H. Baynes, J. B. Bury & G. E. Mylonas - 1930 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 50:145.
  44.  9
    Exploration on the Island of Mochlos. By Richard B. Seager. [American School at Athens.] Pp. 111, 54 Figs., 11 Coloured Plates. Boston, 1912[REVIEW]H. H. & Richard B. Seager - 1912 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 32:196-196.
  45.  8
    The Cemetery of Pachyammos, Crete. By Richard B. Seager. Pp. 30, 21 Plates. University of Pennsylvania Museum: Anthropological Publications, Vol. VII., No. 1. Philadelphia: 1916[REVIEW]H. H. & Richard B. Seager - 1920 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 40 (2):222-223.
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  46.  6
    Travels and Studies in the Nearer East. By A. T. Olmstead, B. B. Charles, and J. E. Wrench. Vol. I., Part II., Hittite Inscriptions. [Cornell Expedition to Asia Minor, Etc., Organised by J. R. S. Sterrett.] Ithaca, N.Y., 1911[REVIEW]H. H., A. T. Olmstead, B. B. Charles & J. E. Wrench - 1912 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 32:195-196.
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  47.  77
    From Dualism to Unity in Quantum Physics[REVIEW]B. J. H. - 1962 - Review of Metaphysics 15 (4):676-676.
    This lucid and compact book contains a forceful critique of the "wave-particle duality" interpretations of quantum theory, and a unitary particle theory which explains the quantum (...)rules in terms of non-quantal axioms. To speak of a wave-particle duality, says Landé, is to speak of an abstraction and a real thing as if they were on a level of parity; and he takes Born's statistical interpretation of quantum phenomena as evidence that a unitary particle theory is needed. The problem then is to explain why particles obey quantum laws of interference and h-dominated periodicity. Although much of the book assumes knowledge of mathematics and physics, many sections require no scientific background; and in the more technical sections there are frequent summaries which state the arguments and conclusions in a non-mathematical way. An incisive and provocative work which deserves to be widely read.--B. J. H. (shrink)
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  48.  25
    Hegel in Berichten Seiner Zeitgenossen.H. B. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):762-763.
    This volume starts where the four-volume work by Johannes Hoffmeister, Briefe von und an Hegel, left off. It consists of excerpts from letters, diaries, memoirs, newspaper (...)and journal articles, etc., much of which has never been published before. What emerges is a conflicting picture of Hegel, the man--from which the reader can take his choice. The comments are from contemporaries: relatives, friends, acquaintances, students, colleagues, admirers, critics, and last, but not least, enemies. The chapters are organized chronologically by city of residence, beginning with Stuttgart, 1770-1788, and covering the periods in Tübingen, Bern, Frankfurt, Jena, Bamberg, Nürnberg, Heidelberg, and Berlin. There is a special chapter on the period immediately following Hegel's death, and a final chapter on After-Effects. The biggest chapter by far is the one on the Berlin period, which spans the longest space of time and also covers the time when Hegel's fame had reached its zenith. All told there are 769 excerpts from the pens of such varied personalities as Karl, Christiane, and Marie Hegel, Hölderlin, Goethe, Schelling, Karl Rosenkranz, Eduard Zeller, Fichte, Schleiermacher, Schiller, Schlegel, Brentano, Savigny, Michelet, Schopenhauer, Victor Cousin, Heine, Feuerbach, Bouterwek, Varnhagen v. Ense, K. F. Zeller, Arnold Ruge, Ranke, Eduard Gans, and many others. This book will undoubtedly figure prominently in future biographies of Hegel. However, it is not only for the Hegel specialist. Those who are interested in that specific period of German culture and those who simply enjoy anecdotal historical commentary will find much of interest and amusement here.--H. B. (shrink)
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  49.  21
    Wilhelm Dilthey's Philosophy of Historical Understanding: A Critical Analysis.H. B. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (2):347-348.
    Although Dilthey is increasingly recognized as a seminal philosopher whose thought finds significant expression in the works of Heidegger, Husserl, Jaspers, Mannheim, Weber, Spranger, Simmel, Troeltsch, and (...)
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  50.  16
    A Whiteheadian Aesthetic.B. J. H. - 1961 - Review of Metaphysics 15 (2):346-346.
    Sherburne has the two-fold purpose of framing an aesthetic theory which gains its coherence and clarity by its derivation from a speculative system, and of exploring (...)the adequacy of that system by applying it to one dimension of experience. He begins by developing clearly the categorial notions of Whitehead's mature philosophy and exhibiting them as integral parts of the speculative scheme, and in some cases revising and reformulating them significantly. Using this material, he then frames an aesthetic theory treating such questions as the ontological status of a work of art, aesthetic experience, and artistic creation. A well-written study that illuminates some of the more difficult aspects of Whitehead's thought, and contributes to the discussion of the metaphysical issues of aesthetics.--B. J. H. (shrink)
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