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Profile: Havi Carel (University of the West of England, Bristol University)
  1. Illness.Havi Carel - 2008 - Routledge.
    What is illness? Is it a physiological dysfunction, a social label, or a way of experiencing the world? How do the physical, social and emotional worlds of a person change when they become ill? And can there be well-being within illness? In this remarkable and thought-provoking book, Havi Carel explores these questions by weaving together the personal story of her own serious illness with insights and reflections drawn from her work as a philosopher. Carel shows how the concepts and language (...)
     
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  2.  35
    Phenomenology as a Resource for Patients.H. Carel - 2012 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (2):96-113.
    Patient support tools have drawn on a variety of disciplines, including psychotherapy, social psychology, and social care. One discipline that has not so far been used to support patients is philosophy. This paper proposes that a particular philosophical approach, phenomenology, could prove useful for patients, giving them tools to reflect on and expand their understanding of their illness. I present a framework for a resource that could help patients to philosophically examine their illness, its impact on their life, and its (...)
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  3.  64
    Phenomenology and its Application in Medicine.Havi Carel - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (1):33-46.
    Phenomenology is a useful methodology for describing and ordering experience. As such, phenomenology can be specifically applied to the first person experience of illness in order to illuminate this experience and enable health care providers to enhance their understanding of it. However, this approach has been underutilized in the philosophy of medicine as well as in medical training and practice. This paper demonstrates the usefulness of phenomenology to clinical medicine. In order to describe the experience of illness, we need a (...)
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  4. Can I Be Ill and Happy?Havi Carel - 2007 - Philosophia 35 (2):95-110.
    Can one be ill and happy? I use a phenomenological approach to provide an answer to this question, using Merleau-Ponty’s distinction between the biological and the lived body. I begin by discussing the rift between the biological body and the ill person’s lived experience, which occurs in illness. The transparent and taken for granted biological body is problematised by illness, which exposes it as different from the lived experience of this body. I argue that because of this rift, the experience (...)
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  5.  16
    Epistemic Injustice in Healthcare: A Philosophical Analysis.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (4):529-540.
  6.  42
    Bodily Doubt.Havi Carel - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    In this paper I explore the tacit underlying sense of bodily certainty that characterizes normal everyday embodied experience. I then propose illness as one instance in which this certainty breaks down and is replaced by bodily doubt. I characterize bodily doubt as radically modifying our experience in three ways: loss of continuity, loss of transparency, and loss of faith in one's body. I then discuss the philosophical insights that arise from the experience of bodily doubt. The paper uses a Humean (...)
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  7.  7
    Illness: The Cry of the Flesh.Havi Carel - 2013 - Routledge.
    What is illness? Is it a physiological dysfunction, a social label, or a way of experiencing the world? How do the physical, social and emotional worlds of a person change when they become ill? And can there be well-being within illness? In this remarkable and thought-provoking book, Havi Carel explores these questions by weaving together the personal story of her own serious illness with insights and reflections drawn from her work as a philosopher. Carel's fresh approach to illness raises some (...)
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  8.  67
    Illness, Phenomenology, and Philosophical Method.Havi Hannah Carel - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (4):345-357.
    In this article, I propose that illness is philosophically revealing and can be used to explore human experience. I suggest that illness is a limit case of embodied experience. By pushing embodied experience to its limit, illness sheds light on normal experience, revealing its ordinary and thus overlooked structure. Illness produces a distancing effect, which allows us to observe normal human behavior and cognition via their pathological counterpart. I suggest that these characteristics warrant illness a philosophical role that has not (...)
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  9. Conspicuous, Obtrusive and Obstinate: A Phenomenology of the Ill Body.Havi Carel - 2015 - In Darian Meacham (ed.), Medicine and Society, New Perspectives in Continental Philosophy. Springer Verlag.
     
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  10.  55
    A Reply to 'Towards an Understanding of Nursing as a Response to Human Vulnerability' by Derek Sellman: Vulnerability and Illness.Havi Carel - 2009 - Nursing Philosophy 10 (3):214-219.
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  11.  29
    The Philosophical Role of Illness.Havi Carel - 2014 - Metaphilosophy 45 (1):20-40.
    This article examines the philosophical role of illness. It briefly surveys the philosophical role accorded to illness in the history of philosophy and explains why illness merits such a role. It suggests that illness modifies, and thus sheds light on, normal experience, revealing its ordinary and therefore overlooked structure. Illness also provides an opportunity for reflection by performing a kind of suspension (epoché) of previously held beliefs, including tacit beliefs. The article argues that these characteristics warrant a philosophical role for (...)
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  12. Health, Illness and Disease: Philosophical Essays.Havi Carel & Rachel Valerie Cooper (eds.) - 2013 - Acumen Publishing.
    What counts as health or ill health? How do we deal with the fallibility of our own bodies? Should illness and disease be considered simply in biological terms, or should considerations of its emotional impact dictate our treatment of it? Our understanding of health and illness had become increasingly more complex in the modern world, as we are able to use medicine not only to fight disease but to control other aspects of our bodies, whether mood, blood pressure, or cholesterol. (...)
     
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  13.  53
    Bernard N. Schumacher: Death and Mortality in Contemporary Philosophy, Trans. Michael J. Miller. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010, 258 Pp, $28.99 (Paperback), ISBN 978-0-521-17119-9; Jeffrey P. Bishop: The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2011, 411 Pp, $35.00 (Paperback), ISBN 978-0-268-02227-3. [REVIEW]Havi Carel - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (6):435-441.
  14.  3
    Life and Death in Freud and Heidegger.Havi Carel - 2006 - Rodopi.
    Life and Death in Freud and Heidegger argues that mortality is a fundamental structuring element in human life. The ordinary view of life and death regards them as dichotomous and separate. This book explains why this view is unsatisfactory and presents a new model of the relationship between life and death that sees them as interlinked. Using Heidegger’s concept of being towards death and Freud’s notion of the death drive, it demonstrates the extensive influence death has on everyday life and (...)
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  15.  84
    Phenomenology and Naturalism: Editors' Introduction.Havi Carel & Darian Meacham - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:1-21.
    This is the editors' introduction to an edited volume devoted to the relation between phenomenology and naturalism across several philosophical domains, including: epistemology, metaphysics, history of philosophy, and philosophy of science and ethics.
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  16.  3
    Epistemic Injustice and Psychiatry.Paul Crichton, Havi Carel & Ian James Kidd - 2016 - Psychiatry Bulletin.
    Epistemic injustice is a harm done to a person in their capacity as an epistemic subject by undermining her capacity to engage in epistemic practices such as giving knowledge to others or making sense of one’s experiences. It has been argued that those who suffer from medical conditions are more vulnerable to epistemic injustice than the healthy. This paper claims that people with mental disorders are even more vulnerable to epistemic injustice than those with somatic illnesses. Two kinds of contributory (...)
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  17.  2
    Even Ethics Professors Fail to Return Library Books.Havi Carel - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (3):211-213.
    Tamara Kayali Browne's suggestion to create a formal role in revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders for philosophers, sociologists, and bioethicists is interesting and stems from a well-supported concern about how nosological psychiatric categories interact with both the epistemic norms of science and philosophy and with their consequences in the world. Browne is grappling with a problem that is clearly stated and pressing. However, I am not convinced that her solution, namely, using experts from these disciplines (...)
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  18. Temporal Finitude and Finitude of Possibility: The Double Meaning of Death in Being and Time.Havi Carel - 2007 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (4):541 – 556.
    The confusion surrounding Heidegger's account of death in Being and Time has led to severe criticisms, some of which dismiss his analysis as incoherent and obtuse. I argue that Heidegger's critics err by equating Heidegger's concept of death with our ordinary concept. As I show, Heidegger's concept of death is not the same as the ordinary meaning of the term, namely, the event that ends life. But nor does this concept merely denote the finitude of Dasein's possibilities or the groundlessness (...)
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  19.  28
    Epistemic Injustice and Illness.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (4).
    This article analyses the phenomenon of epistemic injustice within contemporary healthcare. We begin by detailing the persistent complaints patients make about their testimonial frustration and hermeneutical marginalization, and the negative impact this has on their care. We offer an epistemic analysis of this problem using Miranda Fricker's account of epistemic injustice. We detail two types of epistemic injustice, testimonial and hermeneutical, and identify the negative stereotypes and structural features of modern healthcare practices that generate them. We claim that these stereotypes (...)
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  20.  2
    Understanding Disease and Illness.Jeremy R. Simon, Havi Carel & Alexander Bird - 2017 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 38 (4):239-244.
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  21.  46
    The Problem of Organ Donation.Havi Carel - 2008 - The Philosophers' Magazine 42 (3rd qu):43-49.
    More people desperately require an organ than become donors themselves. When discussing organ donation, people mainly consider the question whether they want to donate, whereas empirically they are more likely to be on the receiving end. So it is rational for each of us to join the organ donor register and to agree to donate our relative’s organs, if we are ever in that situation.
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  22. Epistemic Injustice in Medicine and Healthcare.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - forthcoming - In Ian James Kidd, Gaile Pohlhaus & José Medina (eds.), The Routledge Handbook to Epistemic Injustice. Routledge.
    We survey several ways in which the structures and norms of medicine and healthcare can generate epistemic injustice.
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  23.  63
    Film as Philosophy.Havi Carel & Greg Tuck - 2010 - The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):30-31.
    More people desperately require an organ than become donors themselves. When discussing organ donation, people mainly consider the question whether they want to donate, whereas empirically they are more likely to be on the receiving end. So it is rational for each of us to join the organ donor register and to agree to donate our relative’s organs, if we are ever in that situation.
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  24.  4
    Epistemic Injustice and Illness.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):172-190.
    This article analyses the phenomenon of epistemic injustice within contemporary healthcare. We begin by detailing the persistent complaints patients make about their testimonial frustration and hermeneutical marginalization, and the negative impact this has on their care. We offer an epistemic analysis of this problem using Miranda Fricker's account of epistemic injustice. We detail two types of epistemic injustice, testimonial and hermeneutical, and identify the negative stereotypes and structural features of modern healthcare practices that generate them. We claim that these stereotypes (...)
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  25.  26
    Moral and Epistemic Ambiguity in Oedipus Rex.Havi Carel - 2006 - Janus Head 9 (1):91-109.
    This paper challenges the accepted interpretation of Oedipus Rex, which takes Oedipus’ ignorance of the relevant facts to be an established matter. I argue that Oedipus’ epistemic state is ambiguous, and that this in turn generates a moral ambiguity with respect to his actions. Because ignorance serves as a moral excuse, my demonstration that Oedipus was not ignorant bears significantly on the moral meaning of the play. I next propose to anchor this ambiguity in the Freudian notion of the unconscious, (...)
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  26.  43
    The Ubiquity of Moods.Matthew R. Broome & Havi Carel - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):267-271.
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  27.  19
    Introduction: Culture-Bound Syndromes.Havi Carel & Rachel Cooper - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (4):307-308.
  28.  6
    With Bated Breath: Diagnosis of Respiratory Illness.Havi Carel - 2015 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 58 (1):53-65.
    I have been breathless for a long time. I lagged behind others when walking uphill. I became breathless when dancing. I couldn’t play tennis. But I somehow convinced myself that this was normal. I was getting older—perhaps in one’s mid-30s fitness drops like this, I thought? Perhaps I have “small lungs,” my husband speculated. But we were both physically active, and as we were living in Australia at the time, we enjoyed bush-walking, bike riding, and the sunshine that permeates outdoor (...)
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  29.  15
    Bedside Conversations.Havi Carel - 2013 - Philosophers' Magazine 60 (-1):94 - 98.
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  30.  3
    Epistemic Injustice and Illness.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2):n/a-n/a.
    This article analyses the phenomenon of epistemic injustice within contemporary healthcare. We begin by detailing the persistent complaints patients make about their testimonial frustration and hermeneutical marginalization, and the negative impact this has on their care. We offer an epistemic analysis of this problem using Miranda Fricker's account of epistemic injustice. We detail two types of epistemic injustice, testimonial and hermeneutical, and identify the negative stereotypes and structural features of modern healthcare practices that generate them. We claim that these stereotypes (...)
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  31.  8
    Bernard N. Schumacher:, Trans. Michael J. Miller. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010, 258 Pp, $28.99 (Paperback), ISBN 978-0-521-17119-9; Jeffrey P. Bishop:. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2011, 411 Pp, $35.00 (Paperback), ISBN 978-0-268-02227-3. [REVIEW]Havi Carel - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (6):435-441.
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  32.  1
    Introduction: Culture-Bound Syndromes.Havi Carel & Rachel Cooper - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (4):307-308.
  33.  3
    The Routledge Companion to Film and Philosophy.H. Carel - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):112-114.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  34. Bedside Conversations.Havi Carel - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 60:94-98.
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  35. Bedside Conversations.Havi Carel - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 60:94-98.
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  36. Film as Philosophy.Havi Carel & Greg Tuck - 2010 - The Philosophers' Magazine 50:30-31.
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  37. Health, Illness and Disease: Philosophical Essays.Havi Carel & Rachel Cooper - 2014 - Routledge.
    What counts as health or ill health? How do we deal with the fallibility of our own bodies? Should illness and disease be considered simply in biological terms, or should considerations of its emotional impact dictate our treatment of it? Our understanding of health and illness had become increasingly more complex in the modern world, as we are able to use medicine not only to fight disease but to control other aspects of our bodies, whether mood, blood pressure, or cholesterol. (...)
     
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  38. Health, Illness and Disease.Havi Carel & Rachel Cooper - 2012 - Acumen Publishing.
    What counts as health or ill health? How do we deal with the fallibility of our own bodies? Should illness and disease be considered simply in biological terms, or should considerations of its emotional impact dictate our treatment of it? Our understanding of health and illness had become increasingly more complex in the modern world, as we are able to use medicine not only to fight disease but to control other aspects of our bodies, whether mood, blood pressure, or cholesterol. (...)
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  39. Illness, Second Edition: The Cry of the Flesh.Havi Carel - 2013 - Acumen Publishing.
    What is illness? Is it a physiological dysfunction, a social label, or a way of experiencing the world? How do the physical, social and emotional worlds of a person change when they become ill? And can there be wellbeing within illness? In this remarkable and thought-provoking book, Havi Carel explores these questions by weaving together the personal story of her own serious illness with insights and reflections drawn from her work as a philosopher. Carel’s fresh approach to illness raises some (...)
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  40. Illness: The Cry of the Flesh.Havi Carel - 2015 - Routledge.
    What is illness? Is it a physiological dysfunction, a social label, or a way of experiencing the world? How do the physical, social and emotional worlds of a person change when they become ill? And can there be well-being within illness? In this remarkable and thought-provoking book, Havi Carel explores these questions by weaving together the personal story of her own serious illness with insights and reflections drawn from her work as a philosopher. Carel's fresh approach to illness raises some (...)
     
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  41. Illness: The Cry of the Flesh.Havi Carel - 2014 - Routledge.
    What is illness? Is it a physiological dysfunction, a social label, or a way of experiencing the world? How do the physical, social and emotional worlds of a person change when they become ill? And can there be well-being within illness? In this remarkable and thought-provoking book, Havi Carel explores these questions by weaving together the personal story of her own serious illness with insights and reflections drawn from her work as a philosopher. Carel shows how the concepts and language (...)
     
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  42. In the Grip of Grief:Epistemic Impotence and the Materiality of Mourning in Shinya Tsukamoto’s Vital.Havi Hannah Carel - unknown
    When someone close to us dies, we usually say that we are with them ‘in our thoughts’ or that they remain alive in our minds. The film Vital challenges this disembodied view of grief by posing the following question: what would grief be like if we could keep the dead with us not only in our memories, but materially? The film provides an intriguing answer to this question, provided through a unique setting, that of a medical school dissection class. Despite (...)
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  43. II- Virtue Without Excellence, Excellence Without Health.Havi Carel - 2016 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 90 (1):237-253.
    In this paper I respond to Edward Harcourt’s suggestion that human excellences are structured in a way that allows us to see the multiplicity of life forms that can be instantiated by different groups of excellences. I accept this layered model, but suggest that Harcourt’s proposal is not pluralistic enough, and offer three critical points. First, true pluralism would need to take a life-cycle view, thus taking into account plurality within, as well as between, lives. Second, Harcourt’s pluralism still posits (...)
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  44. New Takes in Film-Philosophy.Havi Carel & Greg Tuck (eds.) - 2011 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    New Takes in Film-Philosophy offers a space for the advancement of the film-philosophy debate by some of its major figures. Fifteen leading academics from Philosophy and Film Studies develop new approaches to film-philosophy, broaden theoretical analyses of the topic and map out problems and possibilities for its future. The collection examines theoretical issues about the relationship between film and philosophy; looks at the relationships film-philosophy has to other media such as photography and literature; and applies theoretical approaches to particular films (...)
     
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  45.  30
    Phenomenology and Naturalism.Havi Carel & Darian Meacham (eds.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    What is the relationship between phenomenology and naturalism? Are they mutually exclusive or is a rapprochement possible between their approaches to consciousness and the natural world? Can phenomenology be naturalised and ought it to be? Or is naturalism fundamentally unable to accommodate phenomenological insights? How can phenomenological method be used within a naturalistic research programme? This cutting-edge collection of original essays contains brilliant contributions from leading phenomenologists across the world. The collection presents a wide range of fascinating and carefully argued (...)
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  46. Phenomenology and Naturalism: Examining the Relationship Between Human Experience and Nature.Havi Carel & Darian Meacham (eds.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    What is the relationship between phenomenology and naturalism? Are they mutually exclusive or is a rapprochement possible between their approaches to consciousness and the natural world? Can phenomenology be naturalised and ought it to be? Or is naturalism fundamentally unable to accommodate phenomenological insights? How can phenomenological method be used within a naturalistic research programme? This cutting-edge collection of original essays contains brilliant contributions from leading phenomenologists across the world. The collection presents a wide range of fascinating and carefully argued (...)
     
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  47. Phenomenology and Naturalism: Editors' Introduction: Havi Carel and Darian Meacham.Havi Carel & Darian Meacham - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:1-21.
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  48. Peter Brooks and Alex Woloch, Eds., Whose Freud? The Place of Psychoanalysis in Contemporary Culture Reviewed By.Havi Carel - 2001 - Philosophy in Review 21 (4):242-244.
     
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  49. The Phenomenology of Illness.Havi Carel - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The experience of illness is a universal and substantial part of human existence. Like death, illness raises important philosophical issues. But unlike death, illness, and in particular the experience of being ill, has received little philosophical attention. In Phenomenology of Illness Havi Carel argues that the experience of illness has been wrongly neglected by philosophers and provides a distinctively philosophical account of illness. Using phenomenology, Carel explores how illness modifies the ill person's body, values, and world. The aim of Phenomenology (...)
     
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  50. The Problem of Organ Donation.Havi Carel - 2008 - The Philosophers' Magazine 42:43-49.
    More people desperately require an organ than become donors themselves. When discussing organ donation, people mainly consider the question whether they want to donate, whereas empirically they are more likely to be on the receiving end. So it is rational for each of us to join the organ donor register and to agree to donate our relative’s organs, if we are ever in that situation.
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