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Heather Draper [57]H. Draper [18]Hal Draper [4]Hai Draper [1]
  1.  72
    Appropriate Methodologies for Empirical Bioethics: It's All Relative.Jonathan Ives & Heather Draper - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (4):249-258.
    In this article we distinguish between philosophical bioethics (PB), descriptive policy orientated bioethics (DPOB) and normative policy oriented bioethics (NPOB). We argue that finding an appropriate methodology for combining empirical data and moral theory depends on what the aims of the research endeavour are, and that, for the most part, this combination is only required for NPOB. After briefly discussing the debate around the is/ought problem, and suggesting that both sides of this debate are misunderstanding one another (i.e. one side (...)
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  2.  59
    Robot Carers, Ethics, and Older People.Tom Sorell & Heather Draper - 2014 - Ethics and Information Technology 16 (3):183-195.
    This paper offers an ethical framework for the development of robots as home companions that are intended to address the isolation and reduced physical functioning of frail older people with capacity, especially those living alone in a noninstitutional setting. Our ethical framework gives autonomy priority in a list of purposes served by assistive technology in general, and carebots in particular. It first introduces the notion of “presence” and draws a distinction between humanoid multi-function robots and non-humanoid robots to suggest that (...)
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  3.  41
    Telecare, Surveillance, and the Welfare State.Tom Sorell & Heather Draper - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):36-44.
    In Europe, telecare is the use of remote monitoring technology to enable vulnerable people to live independently in their own homes. The technology includes electronic tags and sensors that transmit information about the user's location and patterns of behavior in the user's home to an external hub, where it can trigger an intervention in an emergency. Telecare users in the United Kingdom sometimes report their unease about being monitored by a ?Big Brother,? and the same kind of electronic tags that (...)
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  4.  15
    Activism, Bioethics and Academic Research.Heather Draper - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (8):861-871.
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  5.  9
    COVID-19 and Beyond: The Ethical Challenges of Resetting Health Services During and After Public Health Emergencies.Paul Baines, Heather Draper, Anna Chiumento, Sara Fovargue & Lucy Frith - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (11):715-716.
    COVID-19 continues to dominate 2020 and is likely to be a feature of our lives for some time to come. Given this, how should health systems respond ethically to the persistent challenges of responding to the ongoing impact of the pandemic? Relatedly, what ethical values should underpin the resetting of health services after the initial wave, knowing that local spikes and further waves now seem inevitable? In this editorial, we outline some of the ethical challenges confronting those running health services (...)
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  6. Patients' Responsibilities in Medical Ethics.Heather Draper & Tom Sorell - 2002 - Bioethics 16 (4):335–352.
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  7.  5
    Bioethics and Activism.Heather Draper, Greg Moorlock, Wendy Rogers & Jackie Leach Scully - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (8):853-856.
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  8.  28
    Altruism in Organ Donation: An Unnecessary Requirement?: Table 1.Greg Moorlock, Jonathan Ives & Heather Draper - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (2):134-138.
    Altruism has long been taken to be the guiding principle of ethical organ donation in the UK, and has been used as justification for rejecting or allowing certain types of donation. We argue that, despite this prominent role, altruism has been poorly defined in policy and position documents, and used confusingly and inconsistently. Looking at how the term has been used over recent years allows us to define ‘organ donation altruism’, and comparing this with accounts in the philosophical literature highlights (...)
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  9. Telecare, Remote Monitoring and Care.Heather Draper & Tom Sorell - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (7):365-372.
    Telecare is often regarded as a win/win solution to the growing problem of meeting the care needs of an ageing population. In this paper we call attention to some of the ways in which telecare is not a win/win solution but rather aggravates many of the long-standing ethical tensions that surround the care of the elderly. It may reduce the call on carers' time and energy by automating some aspects of care, particularly daily monitoring. This can release carers for other (...)
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  10.  51
    Ethical Values and Social Care Robots for Older People: An International Qualitative Study.Heather Draper & Tom Sorell - 2017 - Ethics and Information Technology 19 (1):49-68.
    Values such as respect for autonomy, safety, enablement, independence, privacy and social connectedness should be reflected in the design of social robots. The same values should affect the process by which robots are introduced into the homes of older people to support independent living. These values may, however, be in tension. We explored what potential users thought about these values, and how the tensions between them could be resolved. With the help of partners in the ACCOMPANY project, 21 focus groups (...)
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  11. Anorexia Nervosa and Respecting a Refusal of Life‐Prolonging Therapy: A Limited Justification.Heather Draper - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (2):120–133.
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  12.  71
    Women, Forced Caesareans and Antenatal Responsibilities.H. Draper - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (6):327-333.
    In the UK in October 1992, Mrs S was forced to have a caesarean section despite her objections to such a procedure on religious grounds. The case once again called into question the obligations of women to the unborn, and also whether one person can be forced to undergo a medical procedure for the benefit of someone else. Re S, like the case of Angela Carder, is often discussed in terms of the conflict between maternal and fetal rights. This paper (...)
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  13.  15
    Ethical challenges experienced by UK military medical personnel deployed to Sierra Leone (operation GRITROCK) during the 2014–2015 Ebola outbreak: a qualitative study. [REVIEW]Heather Draper & Simon Jenkins - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):77.
    As part of its response to the 2014 Ebola outbreak in west Africa, the United Kingdom government established an Ebola treatment unit in Sierra Leone, staffed by military personnel. Little is known about the ethical challenges experienced by military medical staff on humanitarian deployment. We designed a qualitative study to explore this further with those who worked in the treatment unit. Semi-structured, face-to-face and telephone interviews were conducted with 20 UK military personnel deployed between October 2014 and April 2015 in (...)
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  14.  38
    An Empirical Study on the Preferred Size of the Participant Information Sheet in Research.E. E. Antoniou, H. Draper, K. Reed, A. Burls, T. R. Southwood & M. P. Zeegers - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (9):557-562.
    Background Informed consent is a requirement for all research. It is not, however, clear how much information is sufficient to make an informed decision about participation in research. Information on an online questionnaire about childhood development was provided through an unfolding electronic participant sheet in three levels of information. Methods 552 participants, who completed the web-based survey, accessed and spent time reading the participant information sheet (PIS) between July 2008 and November 2009. The information behaviour of the participants was investigated. (...)
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  15.  64
    ‘Equivalence of Care’ in Prison Medicine: Is Equivalence of Process the Right Measure of Equity?Anna Charles & Heather Draper - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (4):215-218.
    In recent years, the principle of equivalence has been accepted in many countries as the standard against which healthcare provision for prisoners should be measured. There are several ways in which this principle can be interpreted, but current policy in the UK and elsewhere seems to focus on the measurement and achievement of equivalence in the process of healthcare provision. We argue that it is not appropriate to apply this interpretation to all aspects of prisoner healthcare, as it does not (...)
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  16.  47
    Non-Professional Healthcare Workers and Ethical Obligations to Work During Pandemic Influenza.H. Draper, T. Sorell, J. Ives, S. Damery, S. Greenfield, J. Parry, J. Petts & S. Wilson - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (1):23-34.
    Most academic papers on ethics in pandemics concentrate on the duties of healthcare professionals. This paper will consider non-professional healthcare workers: do they have a moral obligation to work during an influenza pandemic? If so, is this an obligation that outweighs others they might have, e.g., as parents, and should such an obligation be backed up by the coercive power of law? This paper considers whether non-professional healthcare workers—porters, domestic service workers, catering staff, clerks, IT support workers, etc.—have an obligation (...)
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  17.  12
    Left Of Bang Interventions in Trauma: Ethical Implications for Military Medical Prophylaxis.Neil Eisenstein, David Naumann, Daniel Burns, Sarah Stapley & Heather Draper - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (7):504-508.
    Advances in medical capability should be accompanied by discussion of their ethical implications. In the military medical context there is a growing interest in developing prophylactic interventions that will mitigate the effects of trauma and improve survival. The ethics of this novel capability are currently unexplored. This paper describes the concept of trauma prophylaxis and outlines some of the ethical issues that need to be considered, including within concept development, research and implementation. Trauma prophylaxis can be divided into interventions that (...)
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  18.  35
    Obesity, Liberty and Public Health Emergencies.Jonathan Herington, Angus Dawson & Heather Draper - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (6):26-35.
    Widespread obesity poses a serious challenge to health outcomes in the developed world and is a growing problem in the developing world. There has been a raft of proposals to combat the challenge of obesity, including restrictions on the nature of food advertising, the content of prepared meals, and the size of sodas; taxes on saturated fat and on calories; and mandated “healthy-options” on restaurant menus. Many of these interventions seem to have a greater impact on rates of obesity than (...)
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  19.  22
    Clinical Ethics: Healthcare Workers’ Perceptions of the Duty to Work During an Influenza Pandemic.S. Damery, H. Draper, S. Wilson, S. Greenfield & J. Ives - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):12-18.
    Healthcare workers are often assumed to have a duty to work, even if faced with personal risk. This is particularly so for professionals. However, the health service also depends on non-professionals, such as porters, cooks and cleaners. The duty to work is currently under scrutiny because of the ongoing challenge of responding to pandemic influenza, where an effective response depends on most uninfected HCWs continuing to work, despite personal risk. This paper reports findings of a survey of HCWs conducted across (...)
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  20.  86
    Cutting to the Core: Exploring the Ethics of Contested Surgeries.Michael Benatar, Leslie Cannold, Dena Davis, Merle Spriggs, Julian Savulescu, Heather Draper, Neil Evans, Richard Hull, Stephen Wilkinson, David Wasserman, Donna Dickenson, Guy Widdershoven, Françoise Baylis, Stephen Coleman, Rosemarie Tong, Hilde Lindemann, David Neil & Alex John London - 2006 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    When the benefits of surgery do not outweigh the harms or where they do not clearly do so, surgical interventions become morally contested. Cutting to the Core examines a number of such surgeries, including infant male circumcision and cutting the genitals of female children, the separation of conjoined twins, surgical sex assignment of intersex children and the surgical re-assignment of transsexuals, limb and face transplantation, cosmetic surgery, and placebo surgery.
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  21. Is Sex-Selective Abortion Morally Justified and Should It Be Prohibited?Wendy Rogers, Angela Ballantyne & Heather Draper - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (9):520–524.
  22.  66
    Euthanasia.H. Draper & A. Slowther - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (3):113-115.
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  23.  46
    Beware! Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis May Solve Some Old Problems but It Also Raises New Ones.H. Draper & R. Chadwick - 1999 - Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (2):114-120.
    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PIGD) goes some way to meeting the clinical, psychological and ethical problems of antenatal testing. We should guard, however, against the assumption that PIGD is the answer to all our problems. It also presents some new problems and leaves some old problems untouched. This paper will provide an overview of how PIGD meets some of the old problems but will concentrate on two new challenges for ethics (and, indeed, law). First we look at whether we should always (...)
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  24.  16
    Live Liver Donation, Ethics and Practitioners: 'I Am Between the Two and If I Do Not Feel Comfortable About This Situation, I Cannot Proceed'.H. Draper, S. R. Bramhall, J. Herington & E. H. Thomas - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):157-162.
    This paper discusses the views of 17 healthcare practitioners involved with transplantation on the ethics of live liver donations . Donations between emotionally related donor and recipients increased the acceptability of an LLD compared with those between strangers. Most healthcare professionals disapproved of altruistic stranger donations, considering them to entail an unacceptable degree of risk taking. Participants tended to emphasise the need to balance the harms of proceeding against those of not proceeding, rather than calculating the harm-to-benefits ratio of donor (...)
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  25.  89
    Anorexia Nervosa and Refusal of Naso-Gastric Treatment: A Reply to Simona Giordano.Heather Draper - 2003 - Bioethics 17 (3):279–289.
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  26.  16
    Coercion and Choice in Parent–Child Live Kidney Donation.Philippa Burnell, Sally-Anne Hulton & Heather Draper - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (4):304-309.
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  27.  27
    Medical Students' Attitudes Towards Abortion: A UK Study.R. Gleeson, E. Forde, E. Bates, S. Powell, E. Eadon-Jones & H. Draper - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):783-787.
    Background: There is little research into medical students’ or doctors’ attitudes to abortion, yet knowing this is important, as policy makers should be aware of the views held by professionals directly involved in abortion provision and changing views may have practical implications for the provision of abortion in the future. Methods: We surveyed 300 medical students about their views on abortion, their beliefs about the status of the fetus and the rights of the mother, their attitude towards UK law and (...)
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  28.  45
    Grandparents' Entitlements and Obligations.Heather Draper - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (6):309-316.
    In this article, it is argued that grandparents' obligations originate from parental obligations (i.e from the relationship they have with their children, the parents of their grandchildren) and not from the role of grandparent per se, and any entitlements flow from the extent to which these obligations are met. The position defended is, therefore, that grandparents qua grandparents are not entitled to form or continue relationships with their grandchildren. A continuation of grandparent-grandchildren relationships may be in the interests of children, (...)
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  29.  16
    Treating Anorexics Without Consent: Some Reservations.H. Draper - 1998 - Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (1):5-7.
  30.  56
    Liver Transplantation Using 'Donation After Circulatory Death' Donors: The Ethics of Managing the End-of-Life Care of Potential Donors to Achieve Organs Suitable for Transplantation.Greg Moorlock, Heather Draper & Simon R. Bramhall - 2011 - Clinical Ethics 6 (3):134-139.
    The decline in organs donated after brain death has been countered by an increase in organs donated after circulatory death. Organs donated after circulatory death present an increased risk of complications for their eventual recipients when compared with organs donated after brain death, so the likelihood of successful transplantation is decreased. If organ donation is considered to be in the best interests of the patient, interventions that facilitate successful donation and transplantation might be permissible. This paper seeks to establish whether (...)
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  31.  88
    Becoming a Father/Refusing Fatherhood: An Empirical Bioethics Approach to Paternal Responsibilities and Rights.J. Ives, H. Draper, H. Pattison & C. Williams - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (2):75-84.
    In this paper, we present the first stage of an empirical bioethics project exploring the moral sources of paternal responsibilities and rights. In doing so, we present both (1) data on men's normative constructions of fatherhood and (2) the first of a two-stage methodological approach to empirical bioethics. Using data gathered from 12 focus groups run with UK men who have had a variety of different fathering experiences (n = 50), we examine men's perspectives on how paternal responsibilities and rights (...)
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  32. Virtual Clinical Ethics Committee, Case 7: What Should We Do When a Pregnant Mother Consents to HIV Testing Then Changes Her Mind Before Hearing the Result?Heather Draper, Adam MacDiarmaid-Gordon, Laura Strumidlo, Bea Teuten & Eleanor Updale - 2007 - Clinical Ethics 2 (3):113-120.
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  33.  87
    Paternity Fraud and Compensation for Misattributed Paternity.H. Draper - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (8):475-480.
    Next SectionClaims for reimbursement of child support, the reversal of property settlements and compensation can arise when misattributed paternity is discovered. The ethical justifications for such claims seem to be related to the financial cost of bringing up children, the absence of choice about taking on these expenses, the hard work involved in child rearing, the emotional attachments that are formed with children, the obligation of women to make truthful claims about paternity, and the deception involved in infidelity. In this (...)
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  34. Virtual Ethics Committee, Case 4: Why Can't a Dead Mother Donate a Kidney to Her Son?Heather Draper, Adam MacDiarmaid-Gordon, Laura Strumidlo, Bea Teuten & Eleanor Updale - 2006 - Clinical Ethics 1 (4):183-190.
  35.  30
    Virtual Clinical Ethics Committee, Case 6: Fear of Investigation Affects Patient Care (the Shipman Effect on the Administration of Opiates in the Community).Heather Draper, Adam MacDiarmaid-Gordon, Laura Strumidlo, Bea Teuten & Eleanor Updale - 2007 - Clinical Ethics 2 (2):59-65.
  36.  13
    Research and Patients in a Permanent Vegetative State.H. Draper - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (10):607-607.
    The argument that a permanent vegetative state equates to death because it marks the death of the person is not a new one, but I wonder whether Ravelingien et al1 need to regard those in a PVS as dead to make a case for animal to human transplantation trials taking place in such people. It is not an argument likely to convince anyone who refuses to accept that only human persons have inherent value, dignity or a right to life, and (...)
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  37.  22
    The Myth of Lenin's 'Concept Of The Party': Or What They Did to What Is To Be Done?Hal Draper - 1999 - Historical Materialism 4 (1):187-214.
    The myth for today is an axiom of what we may call Leninology — a branch of Kremlinology that has rapidly grown in the hands of the various university Russian Institutes, doctoral programs, political journalists, et al. According to this axiom, Lenin's 1902 book What Is To Be Done? represents the essential content of his ‘operational code’ or ‘concept of the party’: all of Bolshevism and eventually Stalinism lies in ambush in its pages; it is the canonical work of ‘Leninism’ (...)
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  38.  8
    Ethical Issues in Living-Related Corneal Tissue Transplantation.Joséphine Behaegel, Sorcha Ní Dhubhghaill & Heather Draper - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (7):430-434.
    The cornea was the first human solid tissue to be transplanted successfully, and is now a common procedure in ophthalmic surgery. The grafts come from deceased donors. Corneal therapies are now being developed that rely on tissue from living-related donors. This presents new ethical challenges for ophthalmic surgeons, who have hitherto been somewhat insulated from debates in transplantation and donation ethics. This paper provides the first overview of the ethical considerations generated by ocular tissue donation from living donors and suggests (...)
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  39.  20
    Prisoners as Research Participants: Current Practice and Attitudes in the UK.Anna Charles, Annette Rid, Hugh Davies & Heather Draper - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (4):246-252.
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  40.  1
    Neither ‘Crisis Light’ nor ‘Business as Usual’: Considering the Distinctive Ethical Issues Raised by the Contingency and Reset Phases of a Pandemic.Anna Chiumento, Caroline Redhead, Paul Baines, Sara Fovargue, Heather Draper & Lucy Frith - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (8):34-37.
    We have been researching the distinctive ethical issues raised by what we have called “the reset period,” when non-Covid services resumed alongside the continuing pandemic in the UK. In this commen...
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  41.  8
    Assisted Conception Technology, Parent Selection and the Interest of Children to Adequate Parents.Heather Draper - 2002 - In Ruth F. Chadwick & Doris Schroeder (eds.), Applied Ethics: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 2--3.
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  42.  14
    [Book Review] War and Revolution, Lenin and the Myth of Revolutionary Defeatism. [REVIEW]Hal Draper - 1998 - Science and Society 62 (4):592-594.
  43.  8
    Clinical Ethics Committee Case 4: Our Patient is (Probably) Competent but Would Not Engage with Us and Wants Us to Decide for Her.Heather Draper - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (4):164-167.
  44.  15
    Ethical Challenges Experienced by UK Military Medical Personnel Deployed to Sierra Leone (Operation GRITROCK) During the 2014–2015 Ebola Outbreak: A Qualitative Study. [REVIEW]Heather Draper & Simon Jenkins - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):1-13.
    Background As part of its response to the 2014 Ebola outbreak in west Africa, the United Kingdom government established an Ebola treatment unit in Sierra Leone, staffed by military personnel. Little is known about the ethical challenges experienced by military medical staff on humanitarian deployment. We designed a qualitative study to explore this further with those who worked in the treatment unit. Method Semi-structured, face-to-face and telephone interviews were conducted with 20 UK military personnel deployed between October 2014 and April (...)
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  45.  12
    FOCUS: Can Britain's NHS Managers Be Business-Like and Should They Adopt the Values of Business?Heather Draper - 1996 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 5 (4):207–211.
    The NHS differs from a private business in not aiming at profits and in being obliged to provide only the single product of health care. How radically does this affect the requirement to be “business‐like” and adopt business values? Dr Draper is Lecturer in Biomedical Ethics at The Medical School, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT. She wishes to thank Tom Sorell for his comments on the first draft of this article.
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  46.  9
    FOCUS: Can Britain's NHS Managers Be Business-Like and Should They Adopt the Values of Business?Heather Draper - 1996 - Business Ethics: A European Review 5 (4):207-211.
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  47.  11
    FOCUS: Can Britain's NHS Managers Be Business‐Like and Should They Adopt the Values of Business?Heather Draper - 1996 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 5 (4):207-211.
    The NHS differs from a private business in not aiming at profits and in being obliged to provide only the single product of health care. How radically does this affect the requirement to be “business‐like” and adopt business values? Dr Draper is Lecturer in Biomedical Ethics at The Medical School, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT. She wishes to thank Tom Sorell for his comments on the first draft of this article.
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  48.  21
    Human Reproduction: Principles, Practices, Policies.H. Draper - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (5):313-314.
  49. Jean V. McHale. "Medical Confidentiality and Legal Privilege". [REVIEW]Heather Draper - 1994 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (2):241.
     
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  50.  20
    Martha as a Mother.Heather Draper - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):8-16.
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