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  1.  77
    A Functional Taxonomy of Normative Conflict.H. Hamner Hill - 1987 - Law and Philosophy 6 (2):227-247.
    In this paper I argue for three theses. First, most philosophical analyses of the problem of normative conflict, being based on the impossibility-of-joint-compliance test for conflict, are inadequate. Second, expanding on suggestions made by H. L. A. Hart and Stephen Munzer, I develop an understanding of normative conflict which is not tied to the concept of obedience. Such an understanding of normative conflict is expressly functional: normative conflicts arise when one norm interferes with the intended functioning of another. Third, working (...)
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  2.  12
    Christian Science's Right to Refuse.Richard T. DeGeorge, Margaret Pabst Battin, H. Hamner Hill & Kenneth Kipnis - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (4):2-3.
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  3.  53
    Aristotelian Dialectic.H. Hamner Hill & Michael Kagan - 1995 - Informal Logic 17 (1).
    "Aristotelian Dialectic" is a dialogue between two persons, T and Q, concerning Aristotle's views on the nature of dialectic and rhetoric and also on the role of dialectic and rhetoric in modern education. T advances two theses: that Aristotle views dialectic and rhetoric as intellectual martial arts. to be used to combat the sophists; and that these arts form the basis of Homeric education. T defends this view by examining what Aristotle has to say in the Topics, The Sophistical Refutations, (...)
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  4.  26
    A Thirty-First Way to Mess Up a Critical Thinking Test: A Critical Response to Facione.H. Hamner Hill - 1992 - Informal Logic 14 (2).
  5.  33
    John Dewey’s Legal Pragmatism.H. Hamner Hill - 1997 - Southwest Philosophy Review 13 (1):113-121.
    Dewey's most direct treatment of law and legal theory, "Logical Method and Law," presents a sketch of a pragmatic theory of law. Dewey claims the law needs "a logic relevant to consequences, not antecedents." This paper unpacks Dewey's pragmatic theory of law and outlines some criticisms of Dewey's legal views set forth by the American Legal Realist Karl Llewellyn in an unpublished manuscript titled "John Dewey and Our Law." This paper aims to identify where Dewey and Llewellyn agree and where (...)
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  6.  92
    Are Animals Capable of Deception or Empathy? Implications for Animal Consciousness and Animal Welfare.S. Kuczaj, K. Tranel, M. Trone & H. Hamner Hill - 2001 - Animal Welfare. Special Issue 10:161- 173.
  7. Are Animals Capable of Deception or Empathy?S. Kuczaj, K. Tranel, M. Trone & H. Hamner Hill - 2001 - Implications for Animal Consciousness and Animal Welfare. Animal Welfare Supplement 10.