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  1.  17
    Servivs Avctvs and Donatvs.H. J. Thomson - 1927 - Classical Quarterly 21 (3-4):205-.
    Probably few scholars would now doubt that at least the bulk of the matter both of Servius' commentary on Virgil and of the additions to it which were first printed by Daniel descends from Donatus. The problem of these additions has been approached by a number of writers from different directions, and different lines of evidence have been found to converge on one conclusion. An important contribution to the discussion has recently been made by J. J. Savage in a thorough (...)
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  2.  28
    Communis Sensus.H. J. Thomson - 1920 - The Classical Review 34 (1-2):18-21.
  3.  26
    The Budé Prudentius Prudence. Tome II: Apothéosis, Hamartigénie. Texte établi et traduit par M. Lavarenne. (Collection Budé.) Pp. xix+156. Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1945. Paper, 70 fr. [REVIEW]H. J. Thomson - 1946 - The Classical Review 60 (03):116-117.
  4.  26
    The Budé Prudentius Prudence. Tome I: Cathemerinon Liber (Livre ďHeures). Texte établi et traduit par M. Lavarenne. Pp. xxxix +153. Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1943. Paper, 45 fr. [REVIEW]H. J. Thomson - 1946 - The Classical Review 60 (02):78-79.
  5.  26
    The Psychomachia of Prudentius.H. J. Thomson - 1930 - The Classical Review 44 (03):109-112.
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  6.  18
    It Bello Tessera Signum.H. J. Thomson - 1924 - The Classical Review 38 (1-2):14-15.
  7.  22
    M. Lavarenne: Prudence. Tome IV: Le Livre des Couronnes, Dittochaeon, Épilogue. Texte établi et traduit. (Collection Budé.) Pp. 233. Paris: 'Les Belles Lettres', 1951. Paper. [REVIEW]H. J. Thomson - 1953 - The Classical Review 3 (02):123-.
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  8.  15
    Lucan, Statius, and Juvenal in the Early Centuries.H. J. Thomson - 1928 - Classical Quarterly 22 (1):24-27.
    The histories of literature tell us that these three poets were out of favour with scholars during the second and third centuries and the first half of the fourth. Lucan and Statius certainly had a vogue in the first: Suetonius studied Lucan at school , and Statius can say to his book: ‘Iam te magnanimus dignatur noscere Caesar Itala iam studio discit memoratque iuuentus.’.
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  9.  14
    Figida.H. J. Thomson - 1965 - The Classical Review 15 (02):158-.
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  10.  11
    Martial V. 17, 4.H. J. Thomson - 1926 - Classical Quarterly 20 (3-4):203-.
    Cistifero was the reading of A and B, but for want of a satisfactory interpretation of it, or indeed any evidence for it, cistibero has been preferred. Hirschfeld, who first brought this forward , explained it as meaning one of the ‘quinqueuiri cis Tiberim,’ a low official contrasting effectively with the senator of Gellia's dreams. It seems worth while to call attention to the Abstrusa gloss ,‘Vicorum et cistifer nomina sunt metallorum’ There seems to be no doubt that the first (...)
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  11.  2
    Notes on the Abstrvsa Glossary and the Liber Glossarvm.H. J. Thomson - 1920 - Classical Quarterly 14 (2):87-91.
    The Abstrusa glossary consists to a great extent of glosses extracted apparently from the margins of a Virgil MS., which contained not merely explanations of difficult words but many long scholia taken from ancient commentators such as Donatus and Servius. In its original form it was probably much larger than it appears in C.G.L. IV. The process of curtailment is visible in the MSS. we possess. Moreover, the Liber Glossarum and other glossaries borrowed freely from it, and often show its (...)
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