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  1. The Sanctity-of-Life Doctrine in Medicine: A Critique.Helga Kuhse - 1987 - Oxford University Press.
    According to the "sanctity-of-life" view, all human lives are equally valuable and inviolable, and it would be wrong to base life-and-death medical decisions on the quality of the patient's life. Examining the ideas and assumptions behind the sanctity-of-life view, Kuhse argues against the traditional view that allowing someone to die is morally different from killing, and shows that quality-of-life judgments are ubiquitous. Refuting the sanctity-of-life view, she provides a sketch of a quality-of-life ethics based on the belief that there is (...)
     
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  2.  15
    Should the Baby Live? The Problem of Handicapped Infants.H. Kuhse & Peter Singer - 1985 - Oxford University Press.
    Few subjects have generated so many newspaper headlines and such heated controversy as the treatment, or non-treatment, of handicapped newborns. In 1982, the case of Baby Doe, a child born with Down's syndrome, stirred up a national debate in the United States, while in Britain a year earlier, Dr. Leonard Arthur stood trial for his decision to allow a baby with Down's syndrome to die. Government intervention and these recent legal battles accentuate the need for a reassessment of the complex (...)
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  3.  27
    Debate: Embryo Research The Ethics of Embryo Research.Peter Singer & Helga Kuhse - 1986 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 14 (3-4):133-138.
  4.  6
    5. Debate: Embryo Research The Ethics of Embryo Research1.Peter Singer & Helga Kuhse - 1986 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 14 (3-4):133-138.
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  5. Caring: Nurses, Women, and Ethics.Helga Kuhse - 1997 - Blackwell.
  6.  37
    Voluntary Active Euthanasia and the Nurse: A Comparison of Japanese and Australian Nurses.Noritoshi Tanida, Atsushi Asai, Motoki Ohnishi, Shizuko K. Nagata, Tsuguya Fukui, Yasuji Yamazaki & Helga Kuhse - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (3):313-322.
    Although euthanasia has been a pressing ethical and public issue, empirical data are lacking in Japan. We aimed to explore Japanese nurses’ attitudes to patients’ requests for euthanasia and to estimate the proportion of nurses who have taken active steps to hasten death. A postal survey was conducted between October and December 1999 among all nurse members of the Japanese Association of Palliative Medicine, using a self-administered questionnaire based on the one used in a previous survey with Australian nurses in (...)
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  7. Killing and Letting Die.Helga Kuhse & Peter Singer - 2001 - In John Harris (ed.), Bioethics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  8.  21
    A Companion to Bioethics.Helga Kuhse & Peter Singer (eds.) - 1998 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This second edition of _A Companion to Bioethics,_ fully revised and updated to reflect the current issues and developments in the field, covers all the material that the reader needs to thoroughly grasp the ideas and debates involved in bioethics. Thematically organized around an unparalleled range of issues, including discussion of the moral status of embryos and fetuses, new genetics, life and death, resource allocation, organ donations, AIDS, human and animal experimentation, health care, and teaching Now includes new essays on (...)
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  9.  32
    Double Jeopardy and the Use of QALYs in Health Care Allocation.P. Singer, J. McKie, H. Kuhse & J. Richardson - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (3):144-150.
    The use of the Quality Adjusted Life-Year (QALY) as a measure of the benefit obtained from health care expenditure has been attacked on the ground that it gives a lower value to preserving the lives of people with a permanent disability or illness than to preserving the lives of those who are healthy and not disabled. The reason for this is that the quality of life of those with illness or disability is ranked, on the QALY scale, below that of (...)
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  10. Bioethics: An Anthology.Helga Kuhse & Udo Schüklenk (eds.) - 2015 - Blackwell.
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  11. Unsanctifying Human Life.Peter Singer & Helga Kuhse - 2003 - Philosophical Quarterly 53 (213):596-604.
     
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  12. Critical Notice: Why Killing Is Not Always Worse—and Is Sometimes Better—Than Letting Die.Helga Kuhse - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):371-374.
    The philosophical debate over the moral difference between killing and letting die has obvious relevance for the contemporary public debate over voluntary euthanasia. Winston Nesbitt claims to have shown that killing someone is, other things being equal, always worse than allowing someone to die. But this conclusion is illegitimate. While Nesbitt is correct when he suggests that killing is sometimes worse than letting die, this is not always the case. In this article, I argue that there are occasions when it (...)
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  13. Some Reflections on the Problem of Advance Directives, Personhood, and Personal Identity.Helga Kuhse - 1999 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (4):347-364.
    : In this paper, I consider objections to advance directives based on the claim that there is a discontinuity of interests, and of personal identity, between the time a person executes an advance directive and the time when the patient has become severely demented. Focusing narrowly on refusals of life-sustaining treatment for severely demented patients, I argue that acceptance of the psychological view of personal identity does not entail that treatment refusals should be overridden. Although severely demented patients are morally (...)
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  14. Is There a Tension Between Autonomy and Dignity.Helga Kuhse - 2000 - Bioethics and Biolaw 2:61-74.
     
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  15. Bioethics: An Anthology.Helga Kuhse & Peter Singer (eds.) - 1999 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    The expanded and revised edition of _Bioethics: An Anthology_ is a definitive one-volume collection of key primary texts for the study of bioethics. Brings together writings on a broad range of ethical issues relating such matters as reproduction, genetics, life and death, and animal experimentation. Now includes introductions to each of the sections. Features new coverage of the latest debates on hot topics such as genetic screening, the use of embryonic human stem cells, and resource allocation between patients. The selections (...)
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  16. Why Killing is Not Always Worse–and Sometimes Better–Than Letting Die.Helga Kuhse - 2006 - In Helga Kuhse & Peter Singer (eds.), Bioethics: An Anthology. Blackwell. pp. 1--4.
     
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  17.  89
    Partial and Impartial Ethical Reasoning in Health Care Professionals.H. Kuhse, P. Singer, M. Rickard, L. Cannold & J. van Dyk - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (4):226-232.
    OBJECTIVES: To determine the relationship between ethical reasoning and gender and occupation among a group of male and female nurses and doctors. DESIGN: Partialist and impartialist forms of ethical reasoning were defined and singled out as being central to the difference between what is known as the "care" moral orientation (Gilligan) and the "justice" orientation (Kohlberg). A structured questionnaire based on four hypothetical moral dilemmas involving combinations of (health care) professional, non-professional, life-threatening and non-life-threatening situations, was piloted and then mailed (...)
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  18. Reconciling Impartial Morality and a Feminist Ethic of Care.Helga Kuhse, Peter Singer & Maurice Rickard - 1998 - Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (4):451-463.
    The association of women with caring dispositions and thinking has become a persistent theme in recent feminist writing. There are a number of reasons for this. One reason is the impetus that has been provided by the empirical work of Carol Gilligan on women’s moral development. The fact that this association is not merely an ideologically or philosophically postulated one, but is argued for on empirical grounds, tends to add to its credibility. Another reason for the resilience of the association (...)
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  19. Caring: Nurses, Women and Ethics.Helga Kuhse - 1997 - Wiley-Blackwell.
  20.  15
    The Significance of Age and Duration of Effect in Social Evaluation of Health Care.Erik Nord, Andrew Street, Jeff Richardson, Helga Kuhse & Peter Singer - 1996 - Health Care Analysis 4 (2):103-111.
    To give priority to the young over the elderly has been labelled ‘ageism’. People who express ‘ageist’ preferences may feel that, all else equal, an individual has greater right to enjoy additional life years the fewer life years he or she has already had. We shall refer to this asegalitarian ageism. They may also emphasise the greater expected duration of health benefits in young people that derives from their greater life expectancy. We may call thisutilitarian ageism. Both these forms of (...)
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  21. Embryo Experimentation.Peter Singer, Helga Kuhse, Stephen Buckle, Karen Dawson & Pascal Kasimba (eds.) - 1992 - Cambridge University Press.
    New developments in reproductive technology have made headlines since the birth of the world's first in vitro fertilization baby in 1978. But is embryo experimentation ethically acceptable? What is the moral status of the early human embryo? And how should a democratic society deal with so controversial an issue, where conflicting views are based on differing religious and philosophical positions? These controversial questions are the subject of this book, which, as a current compendium of ideas and arguments on the subject, (...)
     
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  22.  80
    Prolonging Dying is the Same as Prolonging Living--One More Response to Long.H. Kuhse & P. Singer - 1991 - Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (4):205-206.
    In earlier publications, we had argued that Paul Ramsey is inconsistent because he simultaneously asserts that (i) 'all our days and years are of equal worth' and (ii) 'that it is permissible to refrain from prolonging the lives of some dying patients'. Thomas Long has suggested that we have not shown that Paul Ramsey is inconsistent. Ramsey and we, he holds, start from incommensurable metaphysical views: for Ramsey, the dying process has religious significance--God is calling his servant home. While it (...)
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  23.  16
    The Significance of Age and Duration of Effect in Social Evaluation of Health Care.Erik Nord, Andrew Street, Jeff Richardson, Helga Kuhse & Peter Singer - 1996 - Health Care Analysis 4 (2):103-111.
  24. Individuals, Humans, and Persons : The Issue of Moral Status.Helga Kuhse & Peter Singer - 1990 - In John P. Lizza (ed.), Defining the Beginning and End of Life: Readings on Personal Identity and Bioethics. Johns Hopkins University Press.
     
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  25.  43
    End-of-Life Decisions in Medical Practice: A Survey of Doctors in Victoria (Australia).D. A. Neil, C. A. J. Coady, J. Thompson & H. Kuhse - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (12):721-725.
    Objectives: To discover the current state of opinion and practice among doctors in Victoria, Australia, regarding end-of-life decisions and the legalisation of voluntary euthanasia. Longitudinal comparison with similar 1987 and 1993 studies.Design and participants: Cross-sectional postal survey of doctors in Victoria.Results: 53% of doctors in Victoria support the legalisation of voluntary euthanasia. Of doctors who have experienced requests from patients to hasten death, 35% have administered drugs with the intention of hastening death. There is substantial disagreement among doctors concerning the (...)
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  26.  96
    William Godwin and the Defence of Impartialist Ethics.Peter Singer, Leslie Cannold & Helga Kuhse - 1995 - Utilitas 7 (1):67.
    Impartialism in ethics has been said to be the common ground shared by both Kantian and utilitarian approaches to ethics. Lawrence Blum describes this common ground as follows: Both views identify morality with a perspective of impartiality, impersonality, objectivity and universality. Both views imply the ‘ubiquity of impartiality” – that our commitments and projects derive their legitimacy only by reference to this impartial perspective.
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  27.  35
    Quality of Life and the Death of "Baby M". A Report From Australia.Helga Kuhse - 1992 - Bioethics 6 (3):233–250.
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  28.  8
    More On Euthanasia: A Response To Pauer-Studer.Peter Singer & Helsa Kuhse - 1993 - The Monist 76 (2):158-174.
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  29.  41
    Double Jeopardy, the Equal Value of Lives and the Veil of Ignorance: A Rejoinder to Harris.J. McKie, H. Kuhse, J. Richardson & P. Singer - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (4):204-208.
    Harris levels two main criticisms against our original defence of QALYs (Quality Adjusted Life Years). First, he rejects the assumption implicit in the QALY approach that not all lives are of equal value. Second, he rejects our appeal to Rawls's veil of ignorance test in support of the QALY method. In the present article we defend QALYs against Harris's criticisms. We argue that some of the conclusions Harris draws from our view that resources should be allocated on the basis of (...)
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  30.  25
    Caring and Justice: A Study of Two Approaches to Health Care Ethics.Maurice Rickard, Helga Kuhse & Peter Singer - 1996 - Nursing Ethics 3 (3):212-223.
    This article presents an empirical study of approaches to ethical decision-making among nurses and doctors. It takes as its starting point the distinction between the perspectives of care and of justice in ethical thinking, and the view that nurses' thinking will be aligned with the former and doctors' with the latter. It goes on to argue that the differences in these approaches are best understood in terms of the distinction between partialist and impartialist modes of moral thinking. The study seeks (...)
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  31.  8
    Quality of Life and the Death of “Baby M”.Helga Kuhse - 1992 - Bioethics 6 (3):233-250.
  32.  48
    A Modern Myth. That Letting Die is Not the Intentional Causation of Death: Some Reflections on the Trial and Acquittal of Dr Leonard Arthur.Helga Kuhse - 1984 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (1):21-38.
  33.  67
    Another Peep Behind the Veil.J. McKie, H. Kuhse, J. Richardson & P. Singer - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (4):216-221.
    Harris argues that if QALYs are used only 50% of the population will be eligible for survival, whereas if random methods of allocation are used 100% will be eligible. We argue that this involves an equivocation in the use of "eligible", and provides no support for the random method. There is no advantage in having a 100% chance of being "eligible" for survival behind a veil of ignorance if you still only have a 50% chance of survival once the veil (...)
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  34.  81
    Clinical Ethics and Nursing: "Yes" to Caring, but "No" to a Female Ethics of Care.Helga Kuhse - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (3):207–219.
    According to a contemporary school of thought there is a specific female approach to ethics which is based not on abstract “male” ethical principles or rules, but on “care”. Nurses have taken a keen interest in these female approaches to ethics. Drawing on the views expounded by Carol Gilligan and Nel Noddings, nurses claim that a female “ethics of care” better captures their moral experiences than a traditional male “ethics of justice”. This paper argues that “care” is best understood in (...)
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  35.  5
    Still No Academic Freedom in Germany.H. Kuhse & P. Singer - 1999 - Bioethics 13 (2).
  36. Voluntary Euthanasia and Other Medical End-of-Life Decisions: Doctors Should Be Permitted to Give Death a Helping Hand.Helga Kuhse - 1996 - In David C. Thomasma & Thomasine Kimbrough Kushner (eds.), Birth to Death: Science and Bioethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 247--58.
     
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  37. The Case for Active Voluntary Euthanasia.Helga Kuhse - 1986 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 14 (3-4):145-149.
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  38. A Modern Myth: That Letting Die is Not the Intentional Causation of Death.Helga Kuhse - 2006 - In Helga Kuhse & Peter Singer (eds.), Bioethics: An Anthology. Blackwell. pp. 315--328.
     
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  39. Voluntary Euthanasia in the Netherlands and Slippery Slopes.Helga Kuhse - 1992 - Bioethics News 11 (4):1-7.
     
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  40. A Companion to Bioethics, Second Edition.Helga Kuhse & Peter Singer - 1996 - In Dennis M. Patterson (ed.), A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Blackwell.
     
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  41.  80
    More On Euthanasia.Helsa Kuhse - 1993 - The Monist 76 (2):158-174.
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  42.  19
    Extraordinary Means and the Sanctity of Life.Helga Kuhse - 1981 - Journal of Medical Ethics 7 (2):74.
  43.  56
    Should Cloning Be Banned for the Sake of the Child?Helga Kuhse - 2001 - Poiesis and Praxis 1 (1):17-33.
    It is widely believed that reproductive human cloning is morally wrong and should be prohibited because it infringes on human uniqueness, individuality, freedom and personal identity. The philosophical and ethical discussion has, however, shown that it is far more difficult than might initially be supposed to sustain arguments against cloning on these and related grounds. More recently, a potentially viable argument, initially put forward by Hans Jonas, has regained new prominence. The argument holds that cloning is wrong because it denies (...)
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  44.  37
    Zwischen Leben entscheiden: Eine Verteidigung.Peter Singer & Helga Kuhse - 1990 - Analyse & Kritik 12 (2):119-130.
    We examine the view that all human life is of equal worth or sanctity. We find that this view is a legacy of the Judeo-Christian tradition, and cannot be justified in non-religious terms. We therefore argue that it should be rejected, and that we should openly acknowledge that some lives are of less worth than others. We then consider a common objection: that this will lead us down a slippery slope to Nazi-style atrocities. We give our reasons for finding this (...)
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  45.  12
    Resolving Arguments About the Sanctity of Life: A Response to Long.P. Singer & H. Kuhse - 1988 - Journal of Medical Ethics 14 (4):198-199.
    Thomas Long has argued that there is an irreconcilable metaphysical difference between the views of those who, like ourselves, believe that on quality-of-life grounds it is sometimes justifiable to end the life of a severely handicapped infant, and those who, like Paul Ramsey, reject this view. Because of this metaphysical difference, Long considers it impossible for our arguments to refute Ramsey's position. We disagree.
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  46.  39
    Bioethics and the Limits of Tolerance.P. Singer & H. Kuhse - 1994 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (2):129-145.
    Since 1989 there has been an ongoing controversy about the limits of public discussion of bioethical issues in the German-speaking world. While a number of scholars have been involved, Peter Singer and Helga Kuhse have been the principal targets of those seeking to limit bioethical debates. Those who have supported silencing discussion of certain issues have argued that such public discussion leads to a loss of freedom. In the article we argue that toleration is not based on subjectivism but rather (...)
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  47.  48
    Allocating Healthcare By QALYs: The Relevance of Age.John McKie, Helga Kuhse, Jeff Richardson & Peter Singer - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (4):534.
    What proportion of available healthcare funds should be allocated to hip replacement operations and what proportion to psychiatric care? What proportion should go to cardiac patients and what to newborns in intensive care? What proportion should go to preventative medicine and what to treating existing conditions? In general, how should limited healthcare resources be distributed If not all demands can be met?
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  48.  61
    A Clone of Your Own. The Science and Ethics of Cloning.H. Kuhse - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (1):e1-e1.
    A Clone of your Own provides a short, lucid, and very readable introduction to the science of human cloning and some of the central ethical issues surrounding it.The attractive 162 page pocket sized book is interspersed with original and often quirky drawings by David Mann. These drawings, as well as a good number of well chosen and sometimes equally quirky contemporary and archival photographs, provide context and texture and even a sense of wonder to the scientific and ethical discussion. In (...)
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  49.  4
    Clinical Ethics and Nursing: “Yes” to Caring, but “No” to a Female Ethics of Care.Helga Kuhse - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (3):207-219.
    According to a contemporary school of thought there is a specific female approach to ethics which is based not on abstract “male” ethical principles or rules, but on “care”. Nurses have taken a keen interest in these female approaches to ethics. Drawing on the views expounded by Carol Gilligan and Nel Noddings, nurses claim that a female “ethics of care” better captures their moral experiences than a traditional male “ethics of justice”. This paper argues that “care” is best understood in (...)
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  50.  2
    Direct Aid in Dying: Which State Will Be Next?H. Kuhse & P. Singer - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (2).
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