72 found
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  1. The Ethics of Killing and Letting Die: Active and Passive Euthanasia.H. V. McLachlan - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (8):636-638.
    In their account of passive euthanasia, Garrard and Wilkinson present arguments that might lead one to overlook significant moral differences between killing and letting die. To kill is not the same as to let die. Similarly, there are significant differences between active and passive euthanasia. Our moral duties differ with regard to them. We are, in general, obliged to refrain from killing each and everyone. We do not have a similar obligation to try to prevent each and everyone from dying. (...)
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  2. Assisted Suicide and the Killing of People? Maybe. Physician-Assisted Suicide and the Killing of Patients? No: The Rejection of Shaw's New Perspective on Euthanasia.H. V. McLachlan - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):306-309.
    David Shaw presents a new argument to support the old claim that there is not a significant moral difference between killing and letting die and, by implication, between active and passive euthanasia. He concludes that doctors should not make a distinction between them. However, whether or not killing and letting die are morally equivalent is not as important a question as he suggests. One can justify legal distinctions on non-moral grounds. One might oppose physician- assisted suicide and active euthanasia when (...)
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  3.  9
    Murder, Abortion, Contraception, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Deprivation of Non-Discernible and Non-Existent People: A Reply to Marquis and Christensen.Hugh V. McLachlan - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):415-416.
    Marquis’s account of the ethics of abortion is unsatisfactory but not as Christensen implies baseless. It requires to be amended rather than abandoned. It is true, as Marquis asserts that murder and abortion both might deprive people of something of value to them, in particular, the life of a sort that might have been to them worth living. However, it is mistaken to conclude, as Marquis does, that murder and abortion are thereby morally equivalent. Not all deprivation is wrongful. Not (...)
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  4.  15
    To Kill is Not the Same as to Let Die: A Reply to Coggon.H. V. McLachlan - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (7):456-458.
    Coggon’s remarks on a previous paper on active and passive euthanasia elicit a clarification and an elaboration of the argument in support of the claim that there is a moral difference between killing and letting die. The relevant moral duties are different in nature, strength and content. Moreover, not all people who are involved in the relevant situations have the same moral duties. The particular case that is presented in support of the claim that to kill is not the same (...)
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  5.  6
    The Ethics of and the Appropriate Legislation Concerning Killing People and Letting Them Die: A Response to Merkel.Hugh V. McLachlan - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (7):482-484.
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  6.  57
    Babies, Child Bearers and Commodification: Anderson, Brazier Et Al., and the Political Economy of Commercial Surrogate Motherhood. [REVIEW]Hugh V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales - 2000 - Health Care Analysis 8 (1):1-18.
    It is argued by Anderson and also in the BrazierReport that Commercial Surrogate Motherhood (C.S.M.)contracts and agencies should be illegal on thegrounds that C.S.M. involves the commodification ofboth mothers and babies. This paper takes issue withthis view and argues that C.S.M. is not inconsistentwith the proper respect for, and treatment of,children and women. A case for the legalisation ofC.S.M. is made.
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  7.  17
    A Proposed Non-Consequentialist Policy for the Ethical Distribution of Scarce Vaccination in the Face of an Influenza Pandemic.H. V. McLachlan - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (5):317-318.
    The current UK policy for the distribution of scarce vaccination in an influenza pandemic is ethically dubious. It is based on the planned outcome of the maximum health benefit in terms of the saving of lives and the reduction of illness. To that end, the population is classified in terms of particular priority groups. An alternative policy with a non-consequentialist rationale is proposed in the present work. The state should give the vaccination, in the first instance, to those who are (...)
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  8.  13
    Persons and Their Bodies: How We Should Think About Human Embryos. [REVIEW]Hugh V. McLachlan - 2002 - Health Care Analysis 10 (2):155-164.
    The status of human embryos is discussedparticularly in the light of the claim by Fox,in Health Care Analysis 8 that itwould be useful to think of them in terms ofcyborg metaphors.It is argued that we should consider humanembryos for what they are – partiallyformed human bodies – rather than for what theyare like in some respects (and unlike inothers) – cyborgs.However to settle the issue of the status ofthe embryo is not to answer the moral questionswhich arise concerning how embryos (...)
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  9.  32
    Abortion and Dawkins' Fallacious Account of the So-Called 'Great Beethoven Fallacy'.Hugh V. McLachlan - 2010 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 15 (2):44-54.
    In his discussion of ethics and abortion, Prof. Richard Dawkins makes the provocative claim that: ‘The Great Beethoven Fallacy is a typ ical example of the kind of logical mess we get into when our minds are befuddled by religiously inspired absolutism.’ (Dawkins, p. 339) This supposed fallacy is presented as if it exemplified not only a particular view of abortion held, for instance, by certain fundamentalist Christians but as if it revealed some flaw that is characteristic of the thinking (...)
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  10.  20
    Justice and the NHS: A Comment on Culyer.H. V. McLachlan - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):379-382.
    The nature and significance of equity and equality in relation to health and healthcare policy is discussed in the light of a recent article by Culyer. Culyer makes the following claims: the importance of equity in relation to the provision of health care derives from the human need for health in order to flourish; and for the sake of equity, equality of health among the members of particular political jurisdictions should be the aim of health policy. Both these claims are (...)
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  11.  66
    The Unpaid Donation of Blood and Altruism: A Comment on Keown.H. V. McLachlan - 1998 - Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (4):252-256.
    In line with article 3.4 of EC directive 89/381, Keown has presented an ethical case in support of the policy of voluntary, unpaid donation of blood. Although no doubt is cast on the desirability of the policy, that part of Keown's argument which pertains to the suggested laudability of altruism and of its encouragment by social policy is examined and shown to be dubious.
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  12.  89
    Altruism, Blood Donation and Public Policy: A Reply to Keown.H. V. McLachlan - 1999 - Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (6):532-536.
    This is a continuation of and a development of a debate between John Keown and me. The issue discussed is whether, in Britain, an unpaid system of blood donation promotes and is justified by its promotion of altruism. Doubt is cast on the notions that public policies can, and, if they can, that they should, be aimed at the promotion and expression of altruism rather than of self-interest, especially that of a mercenary sort. Reflections upon President Kennedy's proposition, introduced into (...)
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  13. Defending Commercial Surrogate Motherhood Against Van Niekerk and Van Zyl.H. V. McLachlan - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (6):344-348.
    The arguments of Van Niekerk and Van Zyl that, on the grounds that it involves an inappropriate commodification and alienation of women's labour, commercial surrogate motherhood (CSM) is morally suspect are discussed and considered to be defective. In addition, doubt is cast on the notion that CSM should be illegal.
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  14. Exploitation and Commercial Surrogate Motherhood.Hugh V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales - 2001 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 7 (1):8--14.
    Various authors, for instance Elizabeth Anderson, Rosemary Tong, Mary Warnock and Margaret Brazier have argued that commercial surrogate motherhood is exploitative and that it should be prohibited. Their arguments are unconvincing. Exploitation is a more complex notion than it is usually presented as being. Unequal bargaining power can be a cause of exploitation but the exercise of unequal bargaining power is not inevitably or inherently exploitative. Exploitation concerns unfair and/or unjust strategies - rather than the exercise of power as such. (...)
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  15.  16
    Risk, Russian-Roulette and Lotteries: Persson and Savulescu on Moral Enhancement. [REVIEW]Darryl Gunson & Hugh McLachlan - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):877-884.
    The literature concerning the possibility and desirability of using new pharmacological and possible future genetic techniques to enhance human characteristics is well-established and the debates follow some well-known argumentative patterns. However, one argument in particular stands out and demands attention. This is the attempt to tie the moral necessity of moral enhancement to the hypothesised risks that allowing cognitive enhancement will bring. According to Persson and Savulescu, cognitive enhancement should occur only if the risks they think it to poses are (...)
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  16. Moral Rights to Life, Both Natural and Non-Natural: Reflections on James Griffin.Hugh V. McLachlan - 2010 - Diametros 26:58-76.
  17.  32
    Moral Duties and Euthanasia: Why to Kill is Not Necessarily the Same as to Let Die.H. McLachlan - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (12):766-767.
    David Shaw's response to Hugh McLachlan's criticism of his proposed new perspective on euthanasia is ineffectual, mistaken and unfair. It is false to say that the latter does not present an argument to support his claim that there is a moral difference between killing and letting die. It is not the consequences alone of actions that constitute their moral worth. It can matter too what duties are breached or fulfilled by the particular moral agents who are involved.
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  18.  48
    Must We Accept Either the Conservative or the Liberal View on Abortion?Hugh V. McLachlan - 1977 - Analysis 37 (4):197 - 204.
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  19.  35
    Smokers, Virgins, Equity and Health Care Costs.H. V. McLachlan - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (4):209-213.
    Julian Le Grand's case for saying that it would be equitable if smokers and smokers alone were to pay the costs of smoking-related health care is considered and found to be deficient.
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  20. The Unitarian Movement in the Religious Life of England. I.: Its Contribution to Thought and Learning, 1700-1900.H. Mclachlan - 1934 - Philosophy 9 (36):486-487.
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  21.  3
    Bodies, Persons and Research on Human Embryos.Hugh V. McLachlan - 2001 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 8 (1):4-6.
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  22. Moral Rights to Life, Both Natural and Non-Natural: Reflections on James Griffin's Account of Human Rights.Hugh V. McLachlan - 2010 - Diametros 26:58-76.
    Rather than to focus upon a particular ‘right to life’, we should consider what rights there are pertaining to our lives and to our living. There are different sorts. There are, for instance, rights that constitute absences of particular duties and rights that correspond to the duties of other agents or agencies. There are also natural and non-natural rights and duties. Different people in different contexts can have different moral duties and different moral rights including rights to life. The question (...)
     
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  23.  11
    Commercial Agencies and Surrogate Motherhood: A Transaction Cost Approach.Mhairi Galbraith, Hugh V. McLachlan & J. Kim Swales - 2005 - Health Care Analysis 13 (1):11-31.
  24.  84
    Bodies, Rights and Abortion.H. V. McLachlan - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):176-180.
    The issue of abortion is discussed with reference to the claim that people have a right of control over their own bodies. Do people "own" their own bodies? If so, what would be entailed? These questions are discussed in commonsense terms and also in relation to the jurisprudence of Hohfeld, Honore, Munzer and Waldron. It is argued that whether or not women are morally and/or should be legally entitled to have abortions, such entitlements cannot be derived from a general moral (...)
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  25.  30
    A Drunk Driver, a Sober Pedestrian and the Allocation of Tragically Scarce and Indivisible Emergency Hospital Treatment.Hugh V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales - 1999 - Health Care Analysis 7 (1):5-21.
    Le Grand describes a situation where a drunk driver, who has medical insurance, is the cause of an accident in which he and a sober pedestrian, who has no medical insurance, are both equally and seriously injured. At the private hospital to which they are both taken, there is available emergency treatment for one of them only. Who should receive it? The issues raised by Le Grand's example are shown to be more interesting, more complex and less clearcut than Le (...)
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  26.  12
    Surrogate Motherhood, Rights and Duties: A Reply to Campbell. [REVIEW]Hugh V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales - 2001 - Health Care Analysis 9 (1):101-107.
    In a recent article in Health Care Analysis (Vol. 8, No. 1),Campbell misrepresents our specific arguments about commercialsurrogate motherhood (C.S.M.) and our general philosophical andpolitical views by saying or suggesting that we are `Millsian'liberals and consequentialists. He gives too the false impressionthat we do not oppose, in principle, slavery and child purchase.Here our position on C.S.M. is re-expressed and elaborated uponin order to eliminate possible confusion. Our general ethical andphilosophical framework is also outlined and shown to be otherthan Campbell says (...)
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  27.  67
    Why I Don't Believe in Moral Values: A Comment on Culyer.H. V. McLachlan - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (4):242-242.
    In his paper , Culyer talks about “values” and “value judgments” in relation to equity.1 He says: “The focus is on equity in the allocation of health care resources .... These are value laden questions because any idea of “equity” must embody value judgments about what it is that makes for a good society”. He says too: “Equity in health care policy, as in other arenas of policy, is a question of ethics and therefore of values”.I disagree with this way (...)
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  28.  12
    Tibbetts's Theory of Rationality and Scottish Witchcraft.H. V. Mclachlan & J. K. Swales - 1982 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 12 (1):75-79.
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  29.  18
    What Moral Status Should Be Accorded to Those Human Beings Who Have Profound Intellectual Disabilities? A Reply to Curtis and Vehmas.Hugh V. McLachlan - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (8):550-551.
  30.  26
    On the Random Distribution of Scarce Doses of Vaccine in Response to the Threat of an Influenza Pandemic: A Response to Wardrope.H. V. McLachlan - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (2):191-194.
    Wardrope argues against my proposed non-consequentialist policy for the distribution of scarce influenza vaccine in the face of a pandemic. According to him, even if one accepts what he calls my deontological ethical theory, it does not follow that we are required to agree with my proposed randomised allocation of doses of vaccine by means of a lottery. He argues in particular that I fail to consider fully the prophylactic role of vaccination whereby it serves to protect from infection more (...)
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  31.  10
    Thomas, Znaniecki, and Popper on Falsification.Hugh V. McLachlan - 1976 - Journal of the History of Ideas 37 (3):547.
  32.  22
    Surrogate Motherhood: Beyond the Warnock and Brazier Reports.Hugh V. McLachlan & J. Kim Swales - 2005 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 11 (1):12.
  33.  6
    Rationality and the Belief in Witches: A Rejoinder to Tibbetts.H. V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales - 1983 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 13 (4):475-477.
  34.  24
    Book Reviews : Witch-Hunting, Magic and the New Philosophy: An Introduction to Debates of the Scientific Revolution 1450-1750. By Brian Easlea. Sussex and New Jersey: The Harvester Press and Humanities Press, 1980. Pp. 283. $42.50. [REVIEW]H. V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales - 1984 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (4):577-580.
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  35.  3
    The Medicalization of Cyberspace, by Andy Miah and Emma Rich.Hugh V. McLachlan - 2009 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 15 (1):40-40.
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  36.  8
    Tobacco, Taxation, and Fairness.H. V. McLachlan - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (6):381-383.
    The author defends himself against an attack by Smith and Bopp on his views on smoking and taxation. The theory that, on the grounds of equity and/or fairness, smokers should pay via taxation on tobacco for the health care costs of treating smoking-related medical conditions is discussed and shown to be defective. It is argued that the fundamental mistake that Smith and Bopp make is to confuse and conflate the separate issues of whether particular taxes are fair and whether they (...)
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  37. Robert P. George and Christopher Tollefsen Embryo: A Defense of Human Life. Do Ubleday Publishers, 2008, 256 Pages, $27.95, Hb., Isbn: 978-0-8 5-52282-3 (0-8 5-52282-7). [REVIEW]Hugh V. McLachlan - 2010 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 15 (1):40.
     
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  38. John Harris, Enhancing Evolution: The Ethical Case for Making Better People Princeton University Press, 2007, 260 PAGES, $27.95/£ 16. 95 hardbackH A RBACK, ISBN1: 978-0-9 1-128-44-3. [REVIEW]Hugh V. McLachlan - 2010 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 15 (1):40.
     
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  39.  6
    Posthumous Insemination and Consent: The Continuing Troubling Case of Mr and Mrs Blood.H. V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales - 2001 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 9 (1):7-12.
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  40.  7
    The Religious Beliefs of Students and the Teaching of Medical Ethics: A Comment on Brassington.H. V. McLachlan - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):396-398.
    It has recently been suggested by Brassington that, when students in classes in medical ethics announce that some view that they wish to express is related to their religious convictions, the teacher is obliged to question them explicitly about the suggested link. Here, a different conclusion is reached. The view is upheld that, although the stratagem recommended by Brassington is permissible and might sometimes be desirable, it is not obligatory nor is it, in general, likely to be optimal.
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  41.  6
    Unique Persons and the Replicable Gene-Sets of Their Reproducible Bodies: A Defence of Human Cloning.Hugh V. McLachlan - 2005 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 11 (2).
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  42.  11
    Functionalism, Causation and Explanation.Hugh V. Mclachlan - 1976 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 6 (3):235-240.
  43.  10
    Property, Bodies and Wittgenstien.H. McLachlan - 2009 - Open Ethics Journal 3 (1):28-31.
  44.  8
    Genetic Morality – David Shaw.Hugh V. McLachlan - 2008 - Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):564–566.
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  45.  6
    Gellner on Relativism in the Social Sciences.Hugh V. McLachlan - 1988 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 18 (1):113-117.
  46.  1
    Human Reproduction and Rights of Action and of Recipience.Hugh V. McLachlan - 2003 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 10 (2):45-48.
  47. Bertrand Russell on PORNOGRAPHY.Frank Lynch, Hugh Mclachlan & Christopher Nottingham - 1997 - The Philosopher 85 (2).
     
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  48. An Almost Forgotten Pioneer in New Testament Criticism.H. Mclachlan - 1938 - Hibbert Journal 37:617.
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  49. Austin Farrer, a Study in St Mark. [REVIEW]H. J. Mclachlan - 1951 - Hibbert Journal 50:412.
     
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  50. Althusser on Empiricism an Innocent Reader's Reflections on Locke.Hugh V. Mclachlan - 1995
     
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