Results for 'Hamlet A. Gevorkian'

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  1.  48
    The Encounter of Cultures and the Philosophy of History.Hamlet A. Gevorkian - 2001 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2001:147-156.
    A general problem of philosophy concerns the possibility of objective knowledge of other cultures (including past cultures), and the adequacy of their reconstruction. The problem of cultural development is also crucial. In this paper, I argue that a culture which has expanded its potentialities in various independent forms is an open culture capable of entering into dialogue with other cultures.
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  2. Pessimism and Religion.A. R. Gevorkian - 2008 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 46 (4):32-44.
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  3.  18
    Nietzsche and Metaphysical Pessimism.A. R. Gevorkian - 2002 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 41 (3):82-96.
    'The world is tragically splendid in its fragmentedness. Its harmony lies in its disharmony, its unity in its enmity. Such is the paradoxical doctrine of Heraclitus, subsequently paradoxically developed by Friedrich Nietzsche into the theory of 'tragic optimism."'.
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  4. Social Inequality in a Portuguese Hamlet: Land, Late Marriage, and Bastardy, 1870–1978.Brian Juan O'Neill - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    The traditional image of northern Iberian mountain settlements is that they are largely egalitarian, homogeneous, and survivals of archaic forms of 'agrarian collectivism'. In this book, based both on extensive fieldwork and detailed study of local records, Brian Juan O'Neill offers a different perspective, questioning prevailing views on both empirical as well as theoretical and methodological grounds. Through a detailed examination of three major areas of social life - land tenure, cooperative labour exchanges, and marriage and inheritance practices - in (...)
     
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  5.  4
    Shakespeare as a Method. Carl Schmitt’s Reading of Othello and Hamlet.Wojciech Engelking - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (7):1058-1071.
    ABSTRACTWhile in the 1960s Allan Bloom suggested to read William Shakespeare’s works through the prism of political philosophy, a decade earlier Carl Schmitt used the works of English poet in a reverse way: he read political philosophy and history through Shakespeare. Deprived – under the influence of Leo Strauss – from the possibility of considering Thomas Hobbes a decisionist thinker, Schmitt in his ‘Hamlet or Hecuba’ used Shakespeare’s most famous work to interpret origins of disappearance of the state of (...)
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  6.  12
    William F. Hansen, Saxo Grammaticus and the Life of Hamlet: A Translation, History, and Commentary, Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1983. Pp. Xiv, 202; 4 Plates. $17.95. [REVIEW]Joaquin Martinez-Pizarro - 1984 - Speculum 59 (2):475-476.
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  7. Hamlet Could Never Know the Peace of a Good Ending : Benjamin, Derrida, and the Melancholy of Critical Theory.Andrew Cutrofello - 2009 - In Stefano Giacchetti Ludovisi & G. Agostini Saavedra (eds.), Nostalgia for a Redeemed Future: Critical Theory. University of Delaware.
  8.  24
    Shakespearean Tragedy: Lectures on Hamlet, Etc., by A. C. Bradley. [REVIEW]Henry Jones - 1905 - Ethics 16:99.
  9.  33
    Hamlet and Orestes, a Study in Traditional Types. By Gilbert Murray, LL.D., D. Litt. (British Academy Annual Shakespeare Lecture for 1914). Oxford University Press. Is. Net. [REVIEW]P. M. - 1915 - The Classical Review 29 (06):190-.
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  10.  12
    HamLeT anD THe GHosT: A JoinT Sense oF Time.John F. DeCarlo - 2013 - Philosophy and Literature 37 (1):1-19.
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  11.  10
    Missing a Generation: The Rat Man and Hamlet.Robert White - 1997 - Angelaki 2 (1):37 – 61.
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  12.  5
    The Poisoned Chalice: Wine as a Vehicle of Death in Women Beware Women, the Tragedy of Mariam, and Hamlet.Kathleen McGlone - 2009 - Mediaevalia 30:105.
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  13.  6
    Shakespearean Tragedy: Lectures on Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth. A. C. Bradley.Henry Jones - 1905 - International Journal of Ethics 16 (1):99-105.
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  14. " What a Piece of Work is Man": Theatrical Anthropology in Hamlet.Ken Jacobsen - 2012 - Animus 15:47-86.
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  15.  3
    A ‘Trivial’ Reading of Hamlet.Miriam Joseph - 1959 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 15 (2):182.
  16. Hamlet (Bilingual Edition).William Shakespeare - 2017 - Tehran: Mehrandish Books.
    A Persian translation of William Shakespeare's Hamlet along with the original text.
     
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  17. THE CONTRADICTORY NATURE OF THE GHOST IN HAMLET.Ali Salami - 2011 - Sarjana 26 (1).
    This article explores the contradictory nature of the ghost in Hamlet and shows how Shakespeare seeks to manipulate the reader’s response in Hamlet by using contradictions and ambiguities. The article also explores the ways in which the reader responds to these contradictions and reconstructs a palpable world in the impalpable world of the text. These contradictions compel the reader to participate in the composition of the text and make him keep changing his own approach to the work with (...)
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  18. Misers or Lovers? How a Reflection on Christian Mysticism Caused a Shift in Jacques Lacan’s Object Theory.Marc De Kesel - 2013 - Continental Philosophy Review 46 (2):189-208.
    In his sixth seminar, Desire and Its Interpretation (1956–1957), Lacan patiently elaborates his theory of the ‘phantasm’ ($◊a), in which the object of desire (object small a) is ascribed a constitutive role in the architecture of the libidinal subject. In that seminar, Lacan shows his fascination for an aphorism of the twentieth century Christian mystic Simone Weil in her assertion: “to ascertain exactly what the miser whose treasure was stolen lost: thus we would learn much.” This is why, in his (...)
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  19.  31
    Depressive Illness Delayed Hamlet's Revenge.A. B. Shaw - 2002 - Medical Humanities 28 (2):92-96.
    If Hamlet had not delayed his revenge there would have been no play. Many explanations of the delay have been offered in the last four centuries. None is convincing. The interpretation which best fits the evidence best is that Hamlet was suffering from an acute depressive illness, with some obsessional features. He could not make a firm resolve to act. In Shakespeare’s time there was no concept of acute depressive illness, although melancholy was well known. Melancholy, however, would (...)
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  20.  16
    Wawel Meets Elsinore. The National and Universal Aspects of Stanisław Wyspiański’s Vision of Shakespeare’s Hamlet.Andrzej Wicher - 2017 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 7 (7):214-238.
    The aim of this paper is to show the role, the possibilities and the limits of Wyspiański’s national thinking through Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Of particular importance, in this context, is the role the Ghost takes in Wyspiański’s celebrated interpretation of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. By the Ghost we mean the spirit of history, the ghost of a father, the spirit of the fatherland, the voice of the ancestors, and particularly that of the Polish king Casimir the Great, as well as the (...)
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  21.  8
    Speaking to the yet Unknowing World: Hamlet, Horatio and the Problem of Imperfect Witness.Christine Phillips - 2010 - Medical Humanities 36 (2):97-100.
    Every day doctors bear witness to others about the experiences, needs and feelings of their patients, drawing on what they have learnt from clinical consultations. This paper considers the medical task of bearing honourable and truthful witness through an examination of the role and actions of Horatio in Hamlet. Horatio is simultaneously located among the background machinery of the play, separate from the lives of the protagonists, and in the foreground, where his authoritative witness is repeatedly called upon by (...)
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  22.  28
    Towards a Separable “Empirical Reality”?Bernard D'Espagnat - 1990 - Foundations of Physics 20 (10):1147-1172.
    “To be” or “to be found”? Some contributions relative to this modern variant of Hamlet's question are presented here. They aim at better apprehending the differences between the points of view of the physicists who consider that present-day quantum measurement theories do reach their objective and those who deny they do. It is pointed out that these two groups have different interpretations of the verbs “to be” and “to have” and of the criterion for truth. These differences are made (...)
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  23.  15
    Passion's Triumph Over Reason: A History of the Moral Imagination From Spenser to Rochester.Christopher Tilmouth - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Christopher Tilmouth's wide-ranging study of Early Modern ideas of the passions explores a series of philosophical authors in relation to poets and dramatists of the period 1580 to 1680. Aristotle, Aquinas, Augustine, and Hobbes receive detailed treatment here, alongside Spenser's Faerie Queene, Hamlet and Julius Caesar, the lyrics of Herbert and Crashaw, and Milton's Paradise Lost. Central to this innovative exploration of literary-philosophical relations is a comprehensive reappraisal of the works of the Earl of Rochester.
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  24.  58
    Notes on the Phantom: A Complement to Freud's Metapsychology.Nicolas Abraham & Nicholas Rand - 1987 - Critical Inquiry 13 (2):287-292.
    The belief that the spirits of the dead can return to haunt the living exists either as a tenet or as a marginal conviction in all civilizations, whether ancient or modern. More often than not, the dead do not return to reunite the living with their loved ones but rather to lead them into some dreadful snare, entrapping them with disastrous consequences. To be sure, all the departed may return, but some are predestined to haunt: the dead who have been (...)
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  25.  49
    Time Out of Joint: Hamlet and the Pure Form of Time.Henry Somers-Hall - 2011 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 5 (Suppl):56-76.
    The aim of this paper is to explore why Deleuze takes up Hamlet's claim that ‘time is out of joint’. In the first part of this paper, I explore this claim by looking at how Deleuze relates it to Plato's Timaeus and its conception of the relationship between movement and time. Once we have seen how time functions when it is ‘in joint’, I explore what it would mean for time to no longer be understood in terms of an (...)
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  26.  7
    Spatial Analysis of Sade Traditional Hamlet in Lombok Island, Indonesia: The Alteration of Sasak Tribe’s Traditional Living Space.Dini Aiko Subiyantoro, Yasufumi Uekita, Shigeo Oodaira, Kunihiko Ono & Koji Sato - 2019 - Asian Culture and History 11 (2):11.
    Hundred years ago, vernacular architecture once triumphed. Unfortunately, poverty and low education bring people facing difficulties in understanding their own culture, building techniques, and village management. This problem then leads them to a bigger issue regarding the alteration of culture and traditional architecture. Among all vernacular architecture in Indonesia, Sasak traditional architecture is one of the unique architectures that still exist until now. However, globalization issue leads the alteration of vernacular architecture includes Sasak tribe culture and traditional village in Lombok (...)
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  27.  27
    Myth or Knowledge? Reading Carl Schmitt's Hamlet or Hecuba.Carsten Strathausen - 2010 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (153):7-29.
    ExcerptCarl Schmitt's Hamlet or Hecuba (1956) is a peculiar text. For one, it stands out as the only detailed interpretation of a literary work that Schmitt ever produced. This is not to deny Schmitt's overall erudition and familiarity with Western literature nor his particular interest in the intricate relationship between aesthetics and politics, all of which can be traced throughout his writings from the 1910s to the 1950s. But the fact remains that apart from Hamlet or Hecuba, Schmitt (...)
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  28.  11
    Literary Clinical Practice: Desire, Depression and Toxic Masculinity in Hamlet.Scott Wilson - 2018 - Journal for Cultural Research 22 (3):278-292.
    ABSTRACTThis essay introduces the notion of a literary clinical practice for which it remains essential to continue to consider those texts that open up a place for a readership, or audience, or even a civilization to consider the endlessly generative failure of its literature to write mental health. Concerned with mental illness that is an effect of language on the subject, the body, and of the enigma of the truth as cause, psychoanalysis is the crucial interlocutor for any literary clinical (...)
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  29.  33
    Acceptance as a Door of Mercy: Riḍā in Islamic Spirituality.Patrick Laude - 2013 - Cultura 10 (1):119-140.
    There is no religion that does not start from the premise that “something is rotten in the Kingdom of Denmark,” to make use of Hamlet’s suggestive expression:mankind has lost its connection with the principle of its being and disharmony has ensued. This state of affairs, that religion claims to remedy, may be deemed toresult from a sense of radical “otherness” symbolized, in the Abrahamic traditions, by the loss of the blissful unity and proximity of terrestrial paradise. In this paper (...)
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  30.  22
    Dionysus in the Mirror: Hamlet as Nietzsche's Dionysian Man.Pyles Timothy - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):128-141.
    The play's the thing,"1 Hamlet says in act 2, scene 2 of Shakespeare's finest tragedy. Hamlet is referring here to the forthcoming performance of The Mousetrap, the play that he has asked the newly arrived players to perform that evening in the presence of his mother and uncle. "The play's the thing," Hamlet says, "Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the King". But it is not confirmation of his uncle's guilt as the murderer of his father that (...)
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  31.  5
    “The Action to the Word, the Word to the Action”: Reading Hamlet with Cavell and Derrida.R. M. Christofides, April Lodge & David Rudrum - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):177-191.
    The writings of Stanley Cavell and Jacques Derrida share many points of intersection. One of these is their mutual interest in Shakespeare’s Hamlet; another is their assessments of J.L. Austin’s philosophy, and his concept of performativity. In this paper, we demonstrate that Cavell’s and Derrida’s respective essays on Hamlet offer a surprising insight into their views on Austin’s notion of performativity. Since Hamlet abounds with oaths and promises, testimonies and bearing witness, what is surprising is not that (...)
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  32.  8
    The Transfer of Complaint: A Narcissistic Time-Share.Avital Ronell - 2017 - Paragraph 40 (3):279-293.
    Reflecting on the debts collected by Shoshana Felman's work, within the theoretical contexts of the time in which the 1977 Yale French Studies issue of ‘Psychoanalysis and Literature’ first appeared, this article takes as its point of departure Lacan's analysis of Hamlet's father as the barred Other, focusing on Hamlet's ‘complaint’. The nature of the complaint is then explored in relation to various writers and thinkers — Rilke, Benjamin, Nietzsche, Heidegger, among others — and more specifically via a (...)
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  33.  33
    Lacan leest Hamlet tussen fenomenologie en psychoanalyse?Philippe Van Haute - 2007 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 69 (3):535-558.
    In his seminar on 'Desire and its Interpretation' Lacan gives a detailed interpretation of Shakespeare's Hamlet. We present this interpretation as an alternative to the psychobiographic approach which has been dominant in the psychoanalytic tradition. According to Lacan Hamlet is a poetic creation and nothing else. In order to understand it wedon't have to look at the unconscious motives of the author, but at the composition of the text. The deliberate articulation of the signifier accounts for the effect (...)
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  34.  24
    Foreword to the German Edition of Lilian Winstanley's Hamlet and the Scottish Succession.Carl Schmitt - 2010 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (153):164-177.
    ExcerptThe great dramatic work of art that bears the name Hamlet is, in the core of its action and the main character, nothing other than the dramatized story of a real king named James, James Stuart, son of Mary Stuart and her husband. James's father was murdered, and his mother married the murderer shortly afterward. What Mary Stuart, the mother of King James, did was bad, almost as bad “As kill a king, and marry his brother.” Shakespeare's Hamlet (...)
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  35.  2
    Notes on Loving a Mourner.Matt Phillips - 2017 - Paragraph 40 (2):211-227.
    This essay examines the place of love in grief, staging a relation between a mourner and her lover. Taking as its point of departure Freud's observation that mourning leads to a ‘loss of the capacity to love’, it considers the effects bereavement might have on the bereaved's relations with those that love them, and the possibilities, pitfalls and ethics of care in such a context. This is explored largely through a reading of Roland Barthes's late work, as well as ideas (...)
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  36.  7
    El Juego de Mundo en Hamlet.Jorge Osorio - 2008 - Polis 19.
    A partir de una lectura de Hamlet el autor plantea la relación entre el regicidio y el desorden natural, tal como lo entendieron la filosofía política medieval y su transito a la filosofía del Renacimiento. Se indaga en el vínculo de la locura, el extravío dramático y la deriva política, y sus implicancias en la visión moral del mundo presente en la obra. Esta lectura teatral de la política sitúa el problema de la dialéctica ocultación/de-velación de los textos, como (...)
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  37. Spontaneous Self-Organisation: A Limiting Result.Richard Johns - unknown
    The term “spontaneous self-organisation” (SSO for short) is used to describe the emergence of an object or structure “by itself” within a dynamical system. While usage of the term will no doubt vary somewhat, in this paper I will take it to have three key features: 1. The appearance of the object does not require a special, “fine-tuned” initial state. 2. There is no need for interaction with an external system. 3. The object is likely to appear in a reasonably (...)
     
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  38. Deadly Thought: Hamlet and the Human Soul.Jan H. Blits - 2001 - Lexington Books.
    The human soul is for pre-modern philosophers the cause of both thinking and life. This double aspect of the soul, which makes man a rational animal, expresses itself above all in human action. Deadly Thought: 'Hamlet' and the Human Soul traces Hamlet's famous inability to act to his inability to hold together these twin aspects of the soul.
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  39. Psychology, Character, and Performance in Hamlet.Gene Fendt - 2008 - In Ignatius Critical Editions: Hamlet. San Francisco, CA, USA: Ignatius Press. pp. 217-230.
    As Shakespeare is closer in time and spirit to medieval psychology than to popular modern explanations of psyche, this article presents a fourfold analysis of ecstasy from Aquinas' Summa Theologiae to examine the characters of the play. I also suggest performance choices which make a variety of these ecstasies of soul more visible.
     
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  40. Imperial Silences: How Hamlet's Editors Impede Criticism, Repeat Tradition and Defend Interpretative Empires.David Morgan - 1998 - Colloquy 2.
    All people edit. We don't call it editing, of course. We call it thinking. Frogs think too. When a frog thinks'food', it looks for a moving dot; in a cage of dead flies, a frog starves to death. When something doesnot fit the category, it is not seen. Humans likewise. "Do you see nothing there?" Hamlet asks; "Nothingat all; yet all that is I see", Gertrude replies, exemplifying our difficulty with seeingthings not valued.[1] The reason for such editing is (...)
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  41. What a Piece of Work: On Being Human.Helen Oppenheimer - 2006 - Imprint Academic.
    This is a small book on a large subject: What is special about human beings? Hamlet mused, ?What a piece of work is man! How noble in reason! how like a god!? but went on to speak of ?this quintessence of dust?. Helen Oppenheimer prefers to start with the dust and move to the glory: we really are animals ? and from these animals has come Shakespeare. People are indeed ?miserable sinners? ? and also magnificent creatures. The author does (...)
     
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  42. The Maritime Modernity of Hamlet.Yi Wu - 2018 - Coriolis: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Maritime Studies 8 (1):33-49.
    This essay investigates the rôle of the North Atlantic as a silent actant in the dramatic economy of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. It takes the series of actions of Hamlet’s deportation by sea, his nocturnal transformation on board and his surprise return with the pirate ship as the axis around which the play turns. It examines the movement of deterritorialization and mimesis in the constitution of sovereignty by the ceaseless transference of piracy and inter-imperial rivalries and passages. Interpreting Hamlet (...)
     
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  43. Shakespeare's Hamlet: Philosophical Perspectives.Tzachi Zamir (ed.) - 2018 - Oup Usa.
    This book assembles a team of leading literary scholars and philosophers to probe philosophical questions that assert themselves in Shakespeare's Hamlet, including issues about subjectivity, knowledge, sex, grief, and self-theatricalization.
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  44.  16
    The Readiness Was All: Ian Charleson and Richard Eyre's Hamlet.Richard A. Davison - 2008 - The European Legacy 13 (3):325-335.
    This is an account of Ian Charleson's extraordinary performance in Richard Eyre's production of Shakespeare's Hamlet. The essay is divided into four parts: the original Hamlet in Eyre's production was Daniel Day-Lewis whose stirring but erratic portrayal strangely terminated in mid-performance; Ian Charleson's rehearsal process, including comments by actors and friends about his talent and courage in preparing for the role; Charleson's brilliant acting, his triumph in overcoming his physical weakness and ravaged appearance as he was dying of (...)
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  45. Shakespeare's Hamlet: The Way I Visioned..Rituparna Ray Chaudhuri - forthcoming
    On A Complete Self Analysis; Let angels judge it..
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  46.  38
    Hecuba Against Hamlet: Carl Schmitt, Political Theology, and the Stake of Modern Tragedy.Katrin Trüstedt - 2010 - Télos 2010 (153):94-112.
    ExcerptIn recent years, there has been a renewed interest in political theology that is not restricted to certain strands of political philosophy but concerns the humanities as a whole. Conferences and collections put to the fore the question of if and how our modern culture is to be understood in terms—however modified or displaced—of political theology.1 Some of the authors pursuing this question try to define new directions, along the lines of Jean-Luc Nancy or Claude Lefort, who present very different (...)
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  47.  36
    The Paradoxes of Art: A Phenomenological Investigation.Alan Paskow - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this study, Alan Paskow first asks why fictional characters, such as Hamlet and Anna Karenina, matter to us and how they emotionally affect us. He then applies these questions to painting, demonstrating that certain paintings beckon us to view their contents as real. As emblematic of the fundamental concerns of our lives, paintings, he argues, are not simply in our heads but in our world. Paskow also situates the phenomenological approach to the experience of painting in relation to (...)
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  48. Hamlet and Mythical Thought.A. Lorant - 1982 - Diogenes 30 (118):49-76.
  49.  10
    ¿To be or not to be Ophelia?: the feminine role in Hamlet from its dramatic and social development.María del Mar Rodríguez Zárate - 2018 - Alpha (Osorno) 46:251-261.
    Resumen El presente artículo plantea la necesidad de un acercamiento histórico a los textos filosóficos tomando como ejemplo el caso de la propuesta ética de David Hume. Se muestra el interés de Hume por insertarse en el diálogo intelectual de su época y su propósito de integrar el método científico en las ciencias morales y cómo la crítica que hace a la razón debe ser comprendida bajo esta luz. Para ello se menciona el ambiente intelectual de la época y las (...)
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  50.  16
    Shakespearean Tragedy: Lectures on Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth.A. C. Bradley - 1905 - International Journal of Ethics 16 (1):99-105.
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