16 found
Order:
See also
Han Thomas Adriaenssen
University of Groningen
  1.  38
    Representation and Scepticism From Aquinas to Descartes.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2017 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    In this book Han Thomas Adriaenssen offers the first comparative exploration of the sceptical reception of representationalism in medieval and early modern philosophy. Descartes is traditionally credited with inaugurating a new kind of scepticism by saying that the direct objects of perception are images in the mind, not external objects, but Adriaenssen shows that as early as the thirteenth century, critics had already found similar problems in Aquinas's theory of representation. He charts the attempts of philosophers in both periods to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  42
    Between Atoms and Forms: Natural Philosophy and Metaphysics in Kenelm Digby.Han Thomas Adriaenssen & Sander de Boer - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (1):57-80.
    although mostly known to specialists nowadays, Kenelm Digby was a remarkable figure on the intellectual scene of the early seventeenth century. He has been described as “one of the most influential natural philosophers” of his time,1 and corresponded with many of the great scholars of his days, including Descartes, and the French pioneer of atomism, Pierre Gassendi. In the later years of his life, Digby, alongside men like Robert Boyle, became one of the founding members of the Royal Society.2Digby authored (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3. Peter Auriol on the Intuitive Cognition of Nonexistents. Revisiting the Charge of Skepticism in Walter Chatton and Adam Wodeham.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 5 (1):151-180.
    This paper looks at the critical reception of two central claims of Peter Auriol’s theory of cognition: the claim that the objects of cognition have an apparent or objective being that resists reduction to the real being of objects, and the claim that there may be natural intuitive cognitions of nonexistent objects. These claims earned Auriol the criticism of his fellow Franciscans, Walter Chatton and Adam Wodeham. According to them, the theory of apparent being was what had led Auriol to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4.  28
    Antoine Le Grand on the Identity Over Time of the Human Body.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (6):1084-1109.
    ABSTRACTThis paper studies Antoine Le Grand's account of organic identity over time in human bodies. In response to Aristotelian critics who argued that the Cartesian rejection of the Aristotelian ontology of matter and form had put in jeopardy the diachronic identity of material substances in general and of living bodies in particular, Le Grand argued that the identity over time of the human body could be accounted for without the traditional notions of matter and form. The paper shows how he (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  55
    Peter John Olivi and Peter Auriol on Conceptual Thought.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2014 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 2 (1):67-97.
    This paper explores the accounts of conceptual thought of Peter John Olivi (1248–1298) and Peter Auriol (1280–1322). While both thinkers are known for their criticism of representationalist theories of perception, it is argued that they part ways when it comes to analyzing conceptual cognition. To account for the human capacity for conceptual thought, Olivi is happy to make a number of concessions to indirect realist theories of representation. Insofar as he criticizes a specific branch of indirect realism about conceptual thought, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  98
    Peter John Olivi on Perceptual Representation.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2011 - Vivarium 49 (4):324-352.
    Abstract This paper studies Olivi's account of perceptual representation. It addresses two main questions: (1) how do perceptual representations originate? and (2) how do they represent their objects? Regarding (1), it is well known that Olivi emphasizes the activity of the soul in the production of perceptual representations. Yet it is sometimes argued that he overstresses the activity of the soul in a way that yields a philosophically problematic result. I argue that Olivi was well aware of the problem that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7.  29
    The Radical Cartesianism of Robert Desgabets and the Scholastic Heritage.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):46-68.
    Robert Desgabets has been described as a ‘radical Cartesian’. Drawing conclusions from Descartes's thought that Descartes himself had failed to see, Desgabets treated Cartesianism as a work in progress that awaited further enrichment and development. But, as scholars have recognized, Desgabets's writings also betray a significant indebtedness to scholastic tradition. In presenting his philosophy, Desgabets often appeals to traditional notions, breathing new life into scholastic concepts and ideas. This paper investigates what we are to make of the scholastic vestiges in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  28
    Book Review: Perception and the Internal Senses. Peter of John Olivi on the Cognitive Functions of the Sensitive Soul, Written by Juhana Toivanen. [REVIEW]Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2015 - Vivarium 53 (1):126-128.
  9.  1
    Common Conceptions and the Metaphysics of Material Substance: Domingo de Soto, Kenelm Digby and Johannes de Raey.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2019 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 8 (1):117-139.
    This paper explores how, according to three early modern philosophers, philosophical theory should relate to our pre-theoretical picture of reality. Though coming from very different backgrounds, the Spanish scholastic, Domingo de Soto, and the English natural philosopher, Kenelm Digby, agreed that an ability to accommodate our pre-theoretical picture of the world and our ordinary way of speaking about reality is a virtue for a philosophical theory. Yet at the same time, they disagreed on what kind of ontology of the material (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  18
    Locke’s Image of the World.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (6):1237-1238.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Pomponazzi on Identity and Individuation.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - forthcoming - Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    In On Generation and Corruption, Aristotle describes growing as a process in which an individual living being persists as it accumulates new matter. To later Aristotelians, this raised the question of what enables an individual to persist as its material composition continuously changes over time. This paper provides a systematic account of Pietro Pomponazzi’s answer to this question. In his De nutritione et augmentatione, Pomponazzi argues that individuals persist in virtue of their forms. Forms are individuated, in part, by their (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  3
    Thomas Hobbes and Thomas White on Identity and Discontinuous Existence.Han Thomas Adriaenssen & Sam Alma - forthcoming - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
    Is it possible for an individual that has gone out of being to come back into being again? The English Aristotelian, Thomas White, argued that it is not. Thomas Hobbes disagreed, and used the case of the Ship of Theseus to argue that individuals that have gone out of being may come back into being again. This paper provides the first systematic account of their arguments. It is doubtful that Hobbes has a consistent case against White. Still his criticism may (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. The Representation of Hercules. Ockham's Critique of Species.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2015 - Documenti E Studi 26:433-456.
    This paper reconsiders Ockham's critique of the species theory of cognition. As Ockham understands this theory, it says that the direct objects of cognition are mental representations, or species. According to many commentators, one of Ockham's main objections to this theory was that, if the direct objects of cognition are species rather than external objects, we will never be able to establish whether or not a given species is a veridical representation of the world. In this paper I argue that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Thomas White on Location and the Ontological Status of Accidents.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy.
    The work of Thomas White represents a systematic attempt to combine the best of the new science of the seventeenth century with the best of Aristotelian tradition. This attempt earned him the criticism of Hobbes and the praise of Leibniz, but today, most of his attempts to navigate between traditions remain to be explored in detail. This paper does so for his ontology of accidents. It argues that his criticism of accidents in the category of location as entities over and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  47
    The Senses and the History of Philosophy.Brian Glenney, José Filipe Silva, Jana Rosker, Susan Blake, Stephen H. Phillips, Katerina Ierodiakonou, Anna Marmodoro, Lukas Licka, Han Thomas Adriaenssen, Chris Meyns, Janet Levin, James Van Cleve, Deborah Boyle, Michael Madary, Josefa Toribio, Gabriele Ferretti, Clare Batty & Mark Paterson (eds.) - 2019 - New York, USA: Routledge.
    The study of perception and the role of the senses have recently risen to prominence in philosophy and are now a major area of study and research. However, the philosophical history of the senses remains a relatively neglected subject. Moving beyond the current philosophical canon, this outstanding collection offers a wide-ranging and diverse philosophical exploration of the senses, from the classical period to the present day. Written by a team of international contributors, it is divided into six parts: -/- Perception (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. An Early Critic of Locke: The Anti-Scepticism of Henry Lee.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2011 - Locke Studies 11:17-47.
    Although Henry Lee is often recognized to be an important early critic of Locke's 'way of ideas', his Anti-Scepticism (1702) has hardly received the scholarly attention it deserves. This paper seeks to fill that lacuna. It argues that Lee's criticism of Locke's alleged representationalism was original, and that it was quite different from the more familiar kind of criticism that was launched against Locke's theory of ideas by such thinkers as John Sergeant and Thomas Reid. In addition, the paper offers (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark