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Profile: Hannes Ole Matthiessen (Humboldt-University, Berlin)
  1.  19
    Introduction: The Geometry of the Visual Field—Early Modern and Contemporary Approaches.Hannes Ole Matthiessen - 2016 - Topoi 35 (2):461-463.
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  2.  8
    Who Placed the Eye in the Center of a Sphere? Speculations About the Origins of Thomas Reid's Geometry of Visibles.Hannes Ole Matthiessen - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (3):231-251.
    Thomas Reid argued that the geometrical properties of visible figures equal the geometrical properties of their projections on the inside of a sphere centred around the eye. In recent scholarship there are only a few suggestions of which sources might have inspired Reid. I point to a widely ignored body of early eighteenth-century literature – introductions into projective geometry, the use of celestial globes and astronomy – in which the model of the eye in the centre of a sphere was (...)
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  3.  27
    Empirical Conditions for a Reidean Geometry of Visual Experience.Hannes Ole Matthiessen - 2016 - Topoi 35 (2):511-522.
    Thomas Reid's Geometry of Visibles, according to which the geometrical properties of an object's perspectival appearance equal the geometrical properties of its projection on the inside of a sphere with the eye in its centre allows for two different interpretations. It may (1) be understood as a theory about phenomenal visual space – i.e. an account of how things appear to human observers from a certain point of view – or it may (2) be seen as a mathematical model of (...)
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  4. Entitlement and Public Accessibility of Epistemic Status.Hannes Ole Matthiessen - 2013 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 87:75-97.
    In recent epistemological literature, epistemic entitlement is understood as a personal epistemic status that does not require elaborate justificatory activity on behalf of the entitled individual. It is nevertheless internalist in a weaker sense, since it is said to be grounded in perceptual experiences. It seems, however, that the conditions under which an epistemic right holds should, like in cases of most other rights, be publicly observable, because they have implications for the ways others are required to treat the entitled (...)
     
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  5.  50
    Seeing and Hearing Directly.Hannes Ole Matthiessen - 2010 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (1):91-103.
    According to Paul Snowdon, one directly perceives an object x iff one is in a position to make a true demonstrative judgement of the form “That is x”. Whenever one perceives an object x indirectly (or dependently , as Snowdon puts it) it is the case that there exists an item y (which is not identical to x) such that one can count as demonstrating x only if one acknowledges that y bears a certain relation to x. In this paper (...)
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  6. Introduction.Claudia Blöser, Mikael Janvid, Hannes Ole Matthiessen & Marcus Willaschek - 2013 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 87:1-8.
  7.  22
    Defeasibility in Philosophy: Knowledge, Agency, Responsibility, and the Law.Claudia Blöser, Mikael Janvid, Hannes Ole Matthiessen & Marcus Willaschek (eds.) - 2013 - Editions Rodopi.
    Defeasibility, most generally speaking, means that given some set of conditions A, something else B will hold, unless or until defeating conditions C apply. While the term was introduced into philosophy by legal philosopher H.L.A. Hart in 1949, today, the concept of defeasibility is employed in many different areas of philosophy. This volume for the first time brings together contributions on defeasibility from epistemology , legal philosophy and ethics and the philosophy of action . The volume ends with an extensive (...)
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  8. Epistemic Entitlement. The Right to Believe.Hannes Ole Matthiessen - 2014 - Palgrave MacMillan.
    In Epistemic Entitlement. The Right to Believe Hannes Ole Matthiessen develops a social externalist account of epistemic entitlement and perceptual knowledge. The basic idea is that positive epistemic status should be understood as a specific kind of epistemic right, that is a right to believe. Since rights have consequences for how others are required to treat the bearer of the right, they have to be publicly accessible. The author therefore suggests that epistemic entitlement can plausibly be conceptualized as a status (...)
     
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