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Harold Issadore Sharlin [5]Harold I. Sharlin [2]Harold Sharlin [1]
  1.  6
    William Thomson's Dynamical Theory: An Insight Into a Scientist's Thinking.Harold Issadore Sharlin - 1975 - Annals of Science 32 (2):133-147.
    William Thomson, later Lord Kelvin, played a major role in the nineteenth century in changing scientific theory from the statical view, associated with imponderables, to the dynamical view which conceived of energy as a separate and convertible entity. Thomson's conversion from the statical to the dynamical view of nature was due to the influence of experimentalists, Michael Faraday and James Prescott Joule. It was Thomson's use of mathematical metaphor that enabled him to interpret on a theoretical level the physical explanation (...)
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  2.  7
    Herbert Spencer and Scientism.Harold Issadore Sharlin - 1976 - Annals of Science 33 (5):457-465.
    Scientism applies the ideas and methods of the natural sciences to the humanities and social sciences. Herbert Spencer applied the law of the conservation of energy to social questions and arrived at formula answers to the issues of the day. The kind of certitude that Spencer aimed for was possible only by ignoring a system of values. Much as he may have believed that he was above personal beliefs, there are values implicit in Spencer's theories and they are the values (...)
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  3.  7
    News of the Profession.Hunter Dupree, Erwin Hiebert, Chauncey Leake, Harry Woolf, Raymond P. Stearns, Morris Goran & Harold I. Sharlin - 1959 - Isis 50 (2):157-158.
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  4.  8
    A Course in Physics and History: Matching an Unlikely Pair.Harold Issadore Sharlin & Robert A. Leacock - 1977 - Annals of Science 34 (1):57-62.
    A course, ‘Physics, history and society’, has been taught primarily to college freshmen since 1972. Disciplinary lines are sharply drawn, thereby teaching the subject in the same fashion as research is done. The course is about the way physics and history became disciplines and how they have developed, as well as about the rhetoric of physics/history. The main topics are the physicist's/historian's personality as it is related to his work. The history of physics is used to show how a scientist's (...)
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  5.  22
    A Study and Critique of the Teaching of the History of Science and Technology. Interim Report by the Committee on Undergraduate Education of the History of Science Society. [REVIEW]Harold Issadore Sharlin, Stephen G. Brush, Harold L. Burstyn, Sandra Herbert, Michael S. Mahoney & Nathan Sivin - 1975 - Annals of Science 32 (1):55-70.
    The history of science and technology has been a scholarly discipline with little attention given to the special needs of undergraduate teaching. What needs to be done to transform a discipline to an undergraduate subject? Suggestions include using the relation between science and technology as well as the role of interpreters in formulation of the popular world view. Relations with science and history departments are considered. Curriculum materials are surveyed with some recommendations for correcting deficiencies.
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  6.  3
    Science and the Rise of Technology Since 1800The Open UniversityScience and Belief: From Copernicus to Darwin.Harold Issadore Sharlin - 1977 - Isis 68 (3):453-456.