124 found
Order:
  1.  4
    Thrasyllan Platonism.Harold Tarrant - 2020 - Cornell University Press.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2. Who Speaks for Plato?: Studies in Platonic Anonymity.Hayden W. Ausland, Eugenio Benitez, Ruby Blondell, Lloyd P. Gerson, Francisco J. Gonzalez, J. J. Mulhern, Debra Nails, Erik Ostenfeld, Gerald A. Press, Gary Alan Scott, P. Christopher Smith, Harold Tarrant, Holger Thesleff, Joanne Waugh, William A. Welton & Elinor J. M. West - 2000 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this international and interdisciplinary collection of critical essays, distinguished contributors examine a crucial premise of traditional readings of Plato's dialogues: that Plato's own doctrines and arguments can be read off the statements made in the dialogues by Socrates and other leading characters. The authors argue in general and with reference to specific dialogues, that no character should be taken to be Plato's mouthpiece. This is essential reading for students and scholars of Plato.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  3.  9
    Plato's First Interpreters.Harold Tarrant - 2000 - Cornell University Press.
    Harold Tarrant here explores ancient attempts to interpret Plato's writings, by philosophers who spoke a Greek close to Plato's own, and provides a fresh, ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  4.  13
    Thrasyllan Platonism.Harold Tarrant - 1993 - Cornell University Press.
  5.  7
    Scepticism or Platonism?Harold Tarrant - 1987 - Philosophical Review 96 (4):601-603.
  6.  14
    The Neoplatonic Socrates.Harold Tarrant & Danielle A. Layne (eds.) - 2014 - University of Pennsylvania Press.
    In The Neoplatonic Socrates, leading scholars in classics and philosophy address this gap by examining Neoplatonic attitudes toward the Socratic method, Socratic love, Socrates's divine mission and moral example, and the much-debated issue of moral rectitude. Collectively, they demonstrate the importance of Socrates for the majority of Neoplatonists, a point that has often been questioned owing to the comparative neglect of surviving commentaries on the Alcibiades, Gorgias, Phaedo, and Phaedrus, in favor of dialogues dealing explicitly with metaphysical issues. Supplemented with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  28
    Scepticism or Platonism?: The Philosophy of the Fourth Academy.Harold Tarrant - 1985 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the first half of the first century BC the Academy of Athens broke up in disarray. From the wreckage of the semi-sceptical school there arose the new dogmatic philosophy of Antiochus, synthesized from Stoicism and Platonism, and the hardline Pyrrhonist scepticism of Aenesidemus. With his extensive knowledge of the ways in which Plato was read and invoked as an authority in late antiquity Dr Tarrant builds a most impressive reconstruction of Philo of Larissa's brand of Platonism and of its (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  8.  6
    Thrasyllan Platonism.Gisela Striker & Harold Tarrant - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (2):263.
  9.  36
    Socratic Method and Socratic Truth.Harold Tarrant - unknown
    Readers of the early dialogues of Plato may soon feel that his Socrates proceeds methodically towards the ultimate embarrassment of his verbal wrestling-partners. Several recurrent tactics are easily identified, giving credence to claims that Socrates has a method. As Aristotle saw, he demanded universal definitions and he employed epagōgē. He elicited from an interlocutor whose belief he would question certain other beliefs, seemingly more fundamental, entailing the contradiction of the original belief. He flattered, hassled, cajoled, and criticized. He employed his (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  51
    Proclus (C.) Steel Procli in Platonis Parmenidem Commentaria. Volumen I Libros I–III Continens. Co-Edited by Caroline Macé and Pieter d'Hoine. Pp. Liv + 300. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2007. Cased, £37.50. ISBN: 978-0-19-929181-. [REVIEW]Harold Tarrant - 2008 - The Classical Review 58 (2):434-.
  11.  30
    Socratic Synousia : A Post-Platonic Myth?Harold Tarrant - 2005 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (2):131-155.
    Tarrant examines whether the relationship between Socrates and his young followers could ever have been treated by Plato in the same fashion as it is treated in the Platonic Theages, where the terminology of synousia is repeatedly applied to it. In minimizing the part played by knowledge and maximizing the role of the divine and of eros, the work creates a "Socrates" who conforms to the educational ideology of the Academy of Polemo in the period 314-270 BC.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12. Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato.Debra Nails & Harold Tarrant (eds.) - 2015 - Societas Scientiarum Fennica.
  13. The Platonic Alcibiades I: The Dialogue and its Ancient Reception.François Renaud & Harold Tarrant - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    Although it was influential for several hundred years after it first appeared, doubts about the authenticity of the Platonic Alcibiades I have unnecessarily impeded its interpretation ever since. It positions itself firmly within the Platonic and Socratic traditions, and should therefore be approached in the same way as most other Platonic dialogues. It paints a vivid portrait of a Socrates in his late thirties tackling the unrealistic ambitions of the youthful Alcibiades, urging him to come to know himself and to (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  14
    Antiochus: A New Beginning?Harold Tarrant - unknown
    Our knowledge of the Academy between the death of Plato and the first century BC is not extensive, though covered both by Philodemus' Academica, a history of the School on damaged papyrus, and by brief biographies in the fourth book of Diogenes Laertius' Lives of the Philosophers. These biographies cover the main school leaders down to the time of Clitomachus (d. 110/09 BC). It would be usual to see the Academy as having built on Plato's work and maintained his traditions (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15.  51
    Olympiodorus and Proclus on the Climax of the Alcibiades.Harold Tarrant - 2007 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 1 (1):3-29.
    This paper examines the late Neoplatonic evidence for the text at the crucial point of the Alcibiades I, 133c, finding that Olympiodorus' important evidence is not in the lexis, which strangely has nothing to say. Perhaps it was dangerous in Christian Alexandria to record one's views here too precisely. Rather, they are found primarily in the prologue and secondarily in the relevant theoria. Olympiodorus believes that he is quoting from the work or paraphrasing closely, but offers nothing that can be (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  8
    Two Studies in the Early Academy.Harold Tarrant & R. M. Dancy - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (3):399.
  17.  15
    Midwifery and the Clouds.Harold Tarrant - 1988 - Classical Quarterly 38 (01):116-.
    Julius Tomin has recently questioned the new orthodoxy, stemming from Burnyeat's impressive article, that Socratic midwifery is not genuinely Socratic. I understand that many will feel the need to question Burnyeat's position, but I am unhappy that Aristophanes' comedy has once again been thought to give support to the view that Socrates had been known as an intellectual midwife. Thus my response will concentrate on our understanding of Clouds, and in particular on the key passage at 135ff.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  18.  50
    The Mythical Voice in the Timaeus-Critias: Stylometric Indicators.Harold Tarrant, Eugenio E. Benitez & Terry Roberts - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):95-120.
    This article presents evidence over which we stumbled while investigating a completely different part of the Platonic Corpus. While examining the ordinary working vocabulary of the doubtful dialogues and of those undisputed dialogues most readily compared with them, it seemed essential to have a representative sample of Plato's allegedly 'middle' and 'late' dialogues also. The real surprise came when the Critias was included, showing some frequencies not previously observed in Platonic dialogues. This prompted treatment of the Timaeus also, some of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  6
    Introduction.Harold Tarrant & Danielle A. Layne - 2014 - In Harold Tarrant & Danielle A. Layne (eds.), The Neoplatonic Socrates. University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 1-20.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  4
    Chapter 10. The Many-Voiced Socrates: Neoplatonist Sensitivity to Socrates’ Change of Register.Harold Tarrant - 2014 - In Harold Tarrant & Danielle A. Layne (eds.), The Neoplatonic Socrates. University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 143-162.
    Today the name Socrates invokes a powerful idealization of wisdom and nobility that would surprise many of his contemporaries, who excoriated the philosopher for corrupting youth. The problem of who Socrates "really" was—the true history of his activities and beliefs—has long been thought insoluble, and most recent Socratic studies have instead focused on reconstructing his legacy and tracing his ideas through other philosophical traditions. But this scholarship has neglected to examine closely a period of philosophy that has much to reveal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  27
    Zeno on Knowledge or on Geometry? The Evidence of Anon. In Theaetetum.Harold Tarrant - 1984 - Phronesis 29 (1):96-99.
  22.  17
    Zeno on Knowledge or on Geometry? The Evidence of Anon. In Theaetetum'.Harold Tarrant - 1984 - Phronesis 29 (1):96-99.
  23.  6
    Improvement by Love: From Aeschines to the Old Academy.Harold Tarrant - unknown
    The Alcibiades purports to offer us the very first conversation between Socrates and Alcibiades. Previously, it seems, Socrates has just lingered at the back of a crowd of lovers looking rather stupid. This is hardly surprising. Socrates did look stupid, and both Aristophanes and his rival Ameipsias thought that he was good enough material for a laugh to present him on stage in their comedies at the Dionysia of 423 BC. The only slight surprise here is that Alcibiades, though he (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  28
    Proclus: Commentary on Plato's Timaeus: Volume 1, Book 1: Proclus on the Socratic State and Atlantis.Harold Tarrant (ed.) - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Proclus' Commentary on Plato's dialogue Timaeus is arguably the most important commentary on a text of Plato, offering unparalleled insights into eight centuries of Platonic interpretation. This edition offers the first new English translation of the work for nearly two centuries, building on significant recent advances in scholarship on Neoplatonic commentators. It provides an invaluable record of early interpretations of Plato's dialogue, while also presenting Proclus' own views on the meaning and significance of Platonic philosophy. The present volume, the first (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  14
    Plato and Aristotle in Agreement?Harold Tarrant - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):240-247.
  26.  4
    Late Neoplatonic Evidence for the Text of "Pl. Gorg." 491D.Harold Tarrant - 2001 - Hermes 129 (1):118-123.
  27.  11
    Eudorus and the Early Platonist Interpretation of the Categories.Harold Tarrant - 2008 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 64 (3):583-595.
    La tradition herméneutique concernant les Catégories d’Aristote remonte à Eudore et à ses contemporains du premier siècle av. J.-C. Pour interpréter ce texte difficile, il faut que les disciples de Platon considèrent quelques problèmes nouveaux de la dialectique. Les critiques d’Eudore manifestent le désir d’un ordre rigoureux, et elles posent des questions auxquelles la tradition herméneutique, culminant dans le magnifique commentaire de Simplicius, tentera de répondre. Le projet critique d’Eudore ne nous permet pas de parler d’un «ennemi d’Aristote», ni de (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  49
    Philo of Larissa.Harold Tarrant - 2002 - Ancient Philosophy 22 (2):485-492.
  29.  26
    Development, Non-Philosophers and Laws.Harold Tarrant - unknown
  30.  23
    The Conclusion of Parmenides' Poem.Harold Tarrant - 1983 - Apeiron 17 (2):73 - 84.
  31. Naming Socratic Interrogation in the Charmides.Harold Tarrant - 2000 - In Thomas M. Robinson & Luc Brisson (eds.), Plato: Euthydemus, Lysis, Charmides: Proceedings of the V Symposium Platonicum Selected Papers. Academia Verlag. pp. 251-258.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  16
    Athletics, Competition and the Intellectual.Harold Tarrant - unknown
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  35
    Reason, Faith, and Authority: Some Platonist Debates About the Authority of the Teacher.Harold Tarrant - 2000 - Sophia 39 (1):46-63.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  10
    Midwifery and the Clouds.Harold Tarrant - 1988 - Classical Quarterly 38 (1):116-122.
    Julius Tomin has recently questioned the new orthodoxy, stemming from Burnyeat's impressive article, that Socratic midwifery is not genuinely Socratic. I understand that many will feel the need to question Burnyeat's position, but I am unhappy that Aristophanes' comedy has once again been thought to give support to the view that Socrates had been known as an intellectual midwife. Thus my response will concentrate on our understanding of Clouds, and in particular on the key passage at 135ff.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  7
    Plato, Prejudice, and The Mature-Age Student in Antiquity.Harold Tarrant - 1996 - Apeiron 29 (4):105 - 120.
  36. Pleasure and Power, Virtues and Vices.Dirk Baltzly, Dougal Blyth & Harold Tarrant (eds.) - 2001 - Prudentia Supplement.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  18
    Philosophy and Religion.Rick Benitez & Harold Tarrant - 2015 - In J. Kindt & E. Eidenow (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 211-224.
    This chapter reviews the philosophy and religion dialectic from the end of the sixth century BCE through the second century CE, focusing on theology, mythology, and personal religious experience. It suggests that the familiar philosophy–religion dichotomy has acquired some of its plausibility from scholars who misunderstand the nature of religion and draw their concept of ancient philosophy too narrowly. The chapter stresses instead the interrelation of philosophy and religion, with special attention to how some philosophers incorporated religious thought into their (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  16
    Plato's Natural Philosophy (Review).Harold Tarrant - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):150-151.
    Harold Tarrant - Plato's Natural Philosophy - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:1 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.1 150-151 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Harold Tarrant University of Newcastle, Australia Thomas K. Johansen. Plato's Natural Philosophy. Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Pp. vi + 218. Cloth, $75.00. This major study of the philosophy of the Timaeus—provided with excellent argumentation, a fine bibliography, and useful indices—is of wider significance to the interpretation of Plato than (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  5
    The Cambridge History of Classical Literature, Volume I, Parts 1.Alan James, Harold Tarrant & Lindsay Watson - 1992 - History of European Ideas 14 (3):427-427.
  40.  7
    The Cambridge History of Classical Literature, Volume I, Parts 3. [REVIEW]Alan James, Harold Tarrant & Lindsay Watson - 1992 - History of European Ideas 14 (3):427-427.
  41. Agreement and the Self-Evident in Philo of Larissa.Harold Tarrant - 1981 - Dionysius 5:66-97.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42.  23
    Atlantis: Myths, Ancient and Modern.Harold Tarrant - 2007 - The European Legacy 12 (2):159-172.
    In this paper I show that the story of Atlantis, first sketched in Plato's Timaeus and Critias, has been artificially shrouded in mystery since antiquity. While it has been thought from Proclus to the close of the twentieth century that Plato's immediate followers were divided on the issue of whether the story was meant to be historically true, this results from a simple misunderstanding of what historia had meant when the early Academic Crantor was first being cited as an exponent (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  13
    A New Text of Apuleius: The Lost Third Book of the De Platone by Justin A. Stover.Harold Tarrant - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):158-159.
    The publication of a new text on ancient philosophy tends to be an exciting event, but there can be years between discovery and availability. This is an extreme case. Raymond Klibansky discovered the text in 1949 and transcribed it, making it available to friends who were under an obligation not to anticipate his publication of it—which failed to happen. It contains summaries, of very different lengths, of the doctrinal content of thirteen Platonic dialogues. I saw the transcription of this so-called (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  24
    Aristotle on Socratic Communism.Harold Tarrant - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (2):352-353.
  45.  15
    Aristotle, Plato and Pythagoreanism in the First Century BC: New Directions for Philosophy Editor by Malcolm Schofield.Harold Tarrant - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):840-841.
  46.  9
    Aristotle: the desire to understand : Jonathan Lear , xi + 328 pp., £27.50 h.b. £8.95 p.b. [REVIEW]Harold Tarrant - 1990 - History of European Ideas 12 (3):425-427.
  47. Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity.Harold Tarrant, Danielle A. Layne, Dirk Baltzly & François Renaud (eds.) - 2017 - Leiden: Brill.
  48.  9
    Conclusion.Harold Tarrant & Danielle A. Layne - 2014 - In Harold Tarrant & Danielle A. Layne (eds.), The Neoplatonic Socrates. University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 163-166.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  27
    Diogenes of Sinope.Harold Tarrant - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):210-214.
  50.  2
    Diogenes of Sinope: The Man in the Tub. [REVIEW]Harold Tarrant - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):210-214.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 124