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  1.  30
    Multinational Oil Companies and the Adoption of Sustainable Development: A Resource-Based and Institutional Theory Interpretation of Adoption Heterogeneity.Luis Fernando Escobar & Harrie Vredenburg - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):39-65.
    Sustainable development is often framed as a social issue to which corporations should pay attention because it offers both opportunities and challenges. Through the use of institutional theory and the resource-based view of the firm, we shed some light on why, more than 20 years after sustainable development was first introduced, we see neither the adoption of this business model as dominant nor its converse, that is the total abandonment of the model as unworkable and unprofitable. We focus on multinational (...)
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  2.  37
    Morals or Economics? Institutional Investor Preferences for Corporate Social Responsibility.Henry L. Petersen & Harrie Vredenburg - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):1-14.
    This article presents the results of a study that analysed whether social responsibility had any bearing on the decision making of institutional investors. Being that institutional investors prefer socially aligned organizations, this study explored to what extent the corporate actions and/or social/environmental investments influenced their decisions. Our results suggest that there are specific variables that affect the perceived value of the organization, leading to decisions to not only invest, but whether to hold or sell the shares, and therefore having a (...)
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  3.  27
    Indigenous Peoples, Resource Extraction and Sustainable Development: An Ethical Approach.David A. Lertzman & Harrie Vredenburg - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (3):239-254.
    Resource extraction companies worldwide are involved with Indigenous peoples. Historically these interactions have been antagonistic, yet there is a growing public expectation for improved ethical performance of resource industries to engage with Indigenous peoples. (Crawley and Sinclair, Journal of Business Ethics 45, 361–373 (2003)) proposed an ethical model for human resource practices with Indigenous peoples in Australian mining companies. This paper expands on this work by re-framing the discussion within the context of sustainable development, extending it to Canada, and generalizing (...)
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  4.  13
    Why Do Firms Differ? A Resource-Based and Institutional Response of Multinational Corporations Under Sustainable Development Pressures.Luis Fernando Escobar & Harrie Vredenburg - 2006 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:189-194.
    Sustainable development has been framed as a social issue to which corporations must pay attention because it offers both opportunities and challenges.Although scholars in the environmental strategy field have found that the integration of business and sustainable development can result in competitive advantage, international business scholars argue that it does not increase industrial performance. To integrate these research streams, this paper builds upon the institutional theory attempt to understand strategic options of major multinational corporations (MNCs) that are experiencing sustainable development (...)
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  5.  12
    Who Sits at the Table? A New Approach to Stakeholder Selection.Stephanie Bertels & Harrie Vredenburg - 2005 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:293-297.
    When assembling a collaborative initiative, how do you select the appropriate stakeholders to promote collaborative success? We examine the limitations of thestakeholder theory approach to resolving this issue. Instead, we argue that the domain-based perspective and the notion of requisite variety both offer worthwhile perspectives on the issue of participant selection. Combining these perspectives, we pave the way for a theory of participant selection that focuses on evaluating collaborative resources and capabilities at the individual, organizational and domain levels.
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  6. Environmental Response In The Canadian Oil & Gas Industry.Sanjay Sharma & Harrie Vredenburg - 1994 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 5:879-890.
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  7. Strategic Bridging.Sanjay Sharma, Harrie Vredenburg & Frances Westley - 1993 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 4:201-212.
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  8. Environmental Leadership in Three Contexts.Harrie Vredenburg - 1993 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 4:979-990.
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