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Harry Collins [52]Harry M. Collins [6]Harry Shobbrook Collins [1]
  1.  74
    Trading Zones and Interactional Expertise.Harry Collins, Robert Evans & Mike Gorman - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):657-666.
    The phrase ‘trading zone’ is often used to denote any kind of interdisciplinary partnership in which two or more perspectives are combined and a new, shared language develops. In this paper we distinguish between different types of trading zone by asking whether the collaboration is co-operative or coerced and whether the end-state is a heterogeneous or homogeneous culture. In so doing, we find that the voluntary development of a new language community—what we call an inter-language trading zone—represents only one of (...)
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  2.  19
    Experiments with Interactional Expertise.Harry Collins, Rob Evans, Rodrigo Ribeiro & Martin Hall - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (4):656-674.
    ‘Interactional expertise’ is developed through linguistic interaction without full scale practical immersion in a culture. Interactional expertise is the medium of communication in peer review in science, in review committees, and in interdisciplinary projects. It is also the medium of specialist journalists and of interpretative methods in the social sciences. We describe imitation game experiments designed to make concrete the idea of interactional expertise. The experiments show that the linguistic performance of those well socialized in the language of a specialist (...)
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  3.  96
    Three Dimensions of Expertise.Harry Collins - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):253-273.
    Psychologists and philosophers tend to treat expertise as a property of special individuals. These are individuals who have devoted much more time than the general population to the acquisition of their specific expertises. They are often said to pass through stages as they move toward becoming experts, for example, passing from an early stage, in which they follow self-conscious rules, to an expert stage in which skills are executed unconsciously. This approach is ‘one-dimensional’. Here, two extra dimensions are added. They (...)
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  4.  37
    Interactional Expertise as a Third Kind of Knowledge.Harry Collins - 2004 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):125-143.
    Between formal propositional knowledge and embodied skill lies ‘interactional expertise’—the ability to converse expertly about a practical skill or expertise, but without being able to practice it, learned through linguistic socialisation among the practitioners. Interactional expertise is exhibited by sociologists of scientific knowledge, by scientists themselves and by a large range of other actors. Attention is drawn to the distinction between the social and the individual embodiment theses: a language does depend on the form of the bodies of its members (...)
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  5.  17
    The Philosophy of Umpiring and the Introduction of Decision-Aid Technology.Harry Collins - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (2):135-146.
    Recently, technology has impacted upon sports umpiring and refereeing. One effect is that the means to make sound judgments has becoe ?distributed? to new groups of people such as TV viewers and commentators. The result is that justice on the sports field is often seen not to be done and the readiness to question umpires' decisions that once pertained only to the players and, in some sports, to the crowd, has spread to anyone who has a television. What is more, (...)
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  6.  14
    They Give You the Keys and Say 'Drive It!' Managers, Referred Expertise, and Other Expertises.Harry Collins & Gary Sanders - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):621-641.
    On the face of it, the directors of new large scientific projects have an impossible task. They have to make technical decisions about sciences in which they have never made a research contribution—sciences in which they have no contributory expertise. Furthermore, these decisions must be accepted and respected by the scientists who are making research contributions. The problem is discussed in two interviews conducted with two directors of large scientific projects. The paradox is resolved for the managers by their use (...)
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  7.  40
    Stages in the Empirical Programme of Relativism.Harry M. Collins - 1981 - Social Studies of Science 11:3-10.
  8. The Golem: What Everyone Should Know About Science.Harry Collins & Trevor Pinch - 1995 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 46 (2):261-266.
  9.  71
    Transmuted Expertise: How Technical Non-Experts Can Assess Experts and Expertise. [REVIEW]Harry Collins & Martin Weinel - 2011 - Argumentation 25 (3):401-413.
    To become an expert in a technical domain means acquiring the tacit knowledge pertaining to the relevant domain of expertise, at least, according to the programme known as “Studies of Expertise and Experience” (SEE). We know only one way to acquire tacit knowledge and that is through some form of sustained social contact with the group that has it. Those who do not have such contact cannot acquire the expertise needed to make technical judgments. They can, however, use social expertise (...)
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  10.  38
    The Core of Expertise.Harry Collins - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):399-416.
    I reply to my critics in respect of my work on expertise. I define the 'core' of the multidisciplinary 'expertise studies'. I argue that those who have taken the work seriously could resolve their problems by paying more attention to the core. Each could have made good use of an aspect of the core.
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  11.  12
    Expertise Revisited, Part I—Interactional Expertise.Harry Collins & Robert Evans - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 54:113-123.
  12.  51
    Interactional Expertise and Embodiment. Selinger, Evan, Dreyfus, Hubert & Harry Collins - 2007 - Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science 38 (4):722-740.
    In this four part exchange, Evan Selinger starts by stating that Collins’s empirical evidence in respect of linguistic socialization and its bearing on artificial intelligence and expertise is valuable; it advances philosophical and sociological understanding of the relationship between knowledge and language. Nevertheless, he argues that Collins mischaracterizes the data under review and thereby misrepresents how knowledge is acquired and understates the extent to which expert knowers are embodied. Selinger reconstructs the case for the importance of the body in the (...)
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  13.  64
    Interactional Expertise and Embodiment.Evan Selinger, Hubert Dreyfus & Harry Collins - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):722-740.
    In this four part exchange, Evan Selinger starts by stating that Collins’s empirical evidence in respect of linguistic socialization and its bearing on artificial intelligence and expertise is valuable; it advances philosophical and sociological understanding of the relationship between knowledge and language. Nevertheless, he argues that Collins mischaracterizes the data under review and thereby misrepresents how knowledge is acquired and understates the extent to which expert knowers are embodied. Selinger reconstructs the case for the importance of the body in the (...)
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  14.  10
    The Trouble with Madeleine.Harry Collins - 2004 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):165-170.
    I respond to Selinger and Mix (Selinger, E. and Mix, J. 2004. On interactional expertise: Pragmatic and ontological considerations. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3: 145–163), concentrating on their charges that Collins (Collins, H. M. 2004a. Interactional expertise as a third form of knowledge. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3: 125–143) underrates the importance of interactional expertise as an expertise sui generis and that the paper fails to analyse the idea of embodiment sufficiently holistically, misleading treating the ‘body’ as no (...)
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  15.  3
    Demarcating Fringe Science for Policy.Harry Collins, Andrew Bartlett & Luis Reyes-Galindo - forthcoming - Perspectives on Science:411-438.
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  16.  81
    Analysing Tacit Knowledge.Harry Collins - 2011 - Tradition and Discovery 38 (1):38-42.
    I respond to the reviews by Henry and Lowney of my book Tacit and Explicit Knowledge. I stress the need to understand explicit knowledge if tacit knowledge is to be understood. Tacit knowledge must be divided into three kinds: relational, somatic and collective. The idea of relational tacit knowledge is keyto pulling the three kinds apart.
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  17. Trading Zones and Interactional Expertise.Harry Collins, Robert Evans & Mike Gorman - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):657-666.
    The phrase ‘trading zone’ is often used to denote any kind of interdisciplinary partnership in which two or more perspectives are combined and a new, shared language develops. In this paper we distinguish between different types of trading zone by asking whether the collaboration is co-operative or coerced and whether the end-state is a heterogeneous or homogeneous culture. In so doing, we find that the voluntary development of a new language community—what we call an inter-language trading zone—represents only one of (...)
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  18. What is Tacit Knowledge.Harry M. Collins - 2001 - In Theodore R. Schatzki, K. Knorr-Cetina & Eike von Savigny (eds.), The Practice Turn in Contemporary Theory. Routledge. pp. 107--119.
     
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  19. The Construction of the Paranormal: Nothing Unscientific is Happening.Harry M. Collins & Trevor J. Pinch - 1979 - In Roy Wallis (ed.), On the Margins of Science: The Social Construction of Rejected Knowledge. University of Keele. pp. 27--237.
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  20.  25
    Performances and Arguments.Harry Collins - 2012 - Metascience 21 (2):409-418.
    Performances and arguments Content Type Journal Article Category Essay Review Pages 1-10 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9562-0 Authors Harry Collins, SOCSI, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF10 3WT UK Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  21.  86
    Keeping the Collectivity in Mind?Harry Collins, Andy Clark & Jeff Shrager - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):353-374.
    The key question in this three way debate is the role of the collectivity and of agency. Collins and Shrager debate whether cognitive psychology has, like the sociology of knowledge, always taken the mind to extend beyond the individual. They agree that irrespective of the history, socialization is key to understanding the mind and that this is compatible with Clark’s position; the novelty in Clark’s “extended mind” position appears to be the role of the material rather than the role of (...)
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  22.  13
    Introduction: A New Programme of Research?Harry Collins - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
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  23.  22
    Catastrophe Ethics and Activist Speech: Reflections on Moral Norms, Advocacy, and Technical Judgment.Evan Selinger, Paul Thompson & Harry Collins - 2011 - Metaphilosophy 42 (1-2):118-144.
    Abstract: This essay critically examines whether there are ethical dimensions to the way that expertise, knowledge claims, and expressions of skepticism intersect on technical matters that influence public policy, especially during times of crisis. It compares two different perspectives on the matter: a philosophical outlook rooted in discourse and virtue ethics and a sociological outlook rooted in the so-called third-wave approach to science studies. The comparison occurs through metaphilosophical analysis and applied claims that clarify how the disciplinary orientations appear to (...)
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  24.  12
    Studies of Expertise and Experience.Harry Collins - forthcoming - Topoi:1-11.
    I describe the program of analysis of expertise known as ‘Studies of Expertise and Experience’, or ‘SEE’ and contrast it with certain philosophical approaches. SEE differs from many approaches to expertise in that it takes the degree of ‘esotericity’ of the expertise to be one of its characteristics: esotericity is not a defining characteristic of expertise. Thus, native language speaking is taken to be an expertise along with gravitational wave physics. Expertise is taken to be acquired by socialisation within expert (...)
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  25.  9
    Response to One Point in Gingras's Review of Gravity's Shadow.Harry Collins - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (1):151-153.
    Yves Gingras says of my book Gravity’s shadow that it is too long, the style is poor, and in its 870 pages there is nothing new that is not to be regretted. Gingras’s purity of vision would be a cause for congratulation were it not for the appalling implications of one of his claims. For the sake of the future of social science—indeed for the sake of the future of civilisation—it is impossible to leave unchallenged the idea that respondents, who (...)
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  26.  9
    A New Programme of Research?Harry Collins - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):615-620.
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  27.  14
    Expertise Revisited, Part II: Contributory Expertise.Harry Collins, Robert Evans & Martin Weinel - forthcoming - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
  28. Experiments with Interactional Expertise.Harry Collins, Rob Evans, Rodrigo Ribeiro & Martin Hall - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (4):656-674.
    ‘Interactional expertise’ is developed through linguistic interaction without full scale practical immersion in a culture. Interactional expertise is the medium of communication in peer review in science, in review committees, and in interdisciplinary projects. It is also the medium of specialist journalists and of interpretative methods in the social sciences. We describe imitation game experiments designed to make concrete the idea of interactional expertise. The experiments show that the linguistic performance of those well socialized in the language of a specialist (...)
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  29.  4
    Comment.Harry M. Collins - 1993 - Social Epistemology 7 (3):233 – 236.
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  30.  10
    Building an Antenna for Tacit Knowledge.Harry Collins - 2013 - Philosophia Scientiae 17 (3):25-39.
    My book, Tacit and Explicit Knowledge, is introduced. The introduction is also helpful in explaining the book to me, the author.Mon livre, Tacit and Explicit Knowledge, est introduit. L’introduction est également utile pour m’expliquer le livre à moi-même, l’auteur.
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  31.  24
    Who is to Blame for the Challenger Explosion?Harry Collins & Trevor Pinch - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):254-255.
  32.  4
    Social Construction of Reality.Harry Collins - 2016 - Human Studies 39 (1):161-165.
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  33.  6
    What the Tortoise Said to Achilles. [REVIEW]Harry Collins - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Science 35 (4):469-474.
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  34.  10
    Ships That Pass in the Night: Tacit Knowledge in Psychology and Sociology.Harry Collins & Reber - 2013 - Philosophia Scientiæ 17 (3):135-154.
    Reber and Collins are each major researchers in psychology and sociology respectively. Both focus on the analysis and investigation of tacit knowledge. Yet neither had read or cited the other’s work. Here we explore how this similarity of interest can coexist in the midst of ignorance. Over many months we explored the differences in our world views, our approaches to the topic and the difficulties of interdisciplinarity. This paper is a summary of that exchange presented as a kind of case-study (...)
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  35.  20
    Mathematical Understanding and the Physical Sciences.Harry Collins - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):667-685.
    The author claims to have developed interactional expertise in gravitational wave physics without engaging with the mathematical or quantitative aspects of the subject. Is this possible? In other words, is it possible to understand the physical world at a high enough level to argue and make judgments about it without the corresponding mathematics? This question is empirically approached in three ways: anecdotes about non-mathematical physicists are presented; the author undertakes a reflective reading of a passage of physics, first without going (...)
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  36.  18
    Response to Selinger on Dreyfus.Harry M. Collins - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):309-311.
    My claim is clear and unambiguous: no machine will pass a well-designed Turing Test unless we find some means of embedding it in lived social life. We have no idea how to do this but my argument, and all our evidence, suggests that it will not be a necessary condition that the machine have more than a minimal body. Exactly how minimal is still being worked out.
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  37.  4
    The Uses of Sociology of Science for Scientists and Educators.Harry Collins - 2007 - Science and Education 16:217-230.
  38.  1
    Analysing Tacit Knowledge: Response to Henry and Lowney.Harry Collins - 2011 - Tradition and Discovery 38 (1):38-42.
    I respond to the reviews by Henry and Lowney of my book Tacit and Explicit Knowledge. I stress the need to understand explicit knowledge if tacit knowledge is to be understood. Tacit knowledge must be divided into three kinds: relational, somatic and collective. The idea of relational tacit knowledge is keyto pulling the three kinds apart.
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  39.  12
    Gingras and the Rules Regress.Harry Collins - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (1):113-.
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  40.  3
    Symmetry, Forced Asymmetry, Direct Apprehension, and Elective Modernism.Harry Collins - 2014 - Journal of Critical Realism 13 (4):411-421.
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  41.  2
    Eighth IHPST Group International Conference, Leeds, July 15–18, 2005.Harry Collins, Meera Nanda & Peter Bowler - 2005 - Science and Education 14:197-198.
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  42.  2
    Refining the Tacit.Harry Collins - 2013 - Philosophia Scientiæ 17 (3):155-178.
    General For one’s work to be made the topic of a special issue of a journal is an enormous honour. That it is a philosophy journal makes the honour still greater since I am not a professional philosopher. Though I have no technical and scholarly training in philosophy, I have, however, learned hugely from a certain style of philosophical work, and from the start of my career in sociology, the later philosophy of Wittgenstein has been a dominant role model. Thus (...)
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  43.  2
    The Golden Fleece.Harry Collins - 2000 - Minerva 38 (4):469-471.
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  44.  4
    Humans Not Instruments.Harry Collins - 2010 - Spontaneous Generations 4 (1):138-147.
    I argue that it is serious mistake to treat instruments as having parity with humans in the making of scientific knowledge. I try to show why the parity view is misplaced by beginning with the “Extended Mind” thesis which can be seen as an individualistic version of Actor/ant Network Theory, and then move on to instruments. The idea of parity cannot be maintained in the face of close examination of actions as simple as doing a calculation or accepting the reading (...)
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  45. Building an Antenna for Tacit Knowledge.Harry Collins - 2013 - Philosophia Scientae 17:25-39.
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  46. Commentary on The Scientific Status of Econometrics.Harry Collins - 1993 - Social Epistemology 7 (3):233-36.
     
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  47. Gingras and the Rules Regress.Harry Collins - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (1):113.
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  48. Mathematical Understanding and the Physical Sciences.Harry Collins - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):667-685.
    The author claims to have developed interactional expertise in gravitational wave physics without engaging with the mathematical or quantitative aspects of the subject. Is this possible? In other words, is it possible to understand the physical world at a high enough level to argue and make judgments about it without the corresponding mathematics? This question is empirically approached in three ways: anecdotes about non-mathematical physicists are presented; the author undertakes a reflective reading of a passage of physics, first without going (...)
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  49. Response to One Point in Gingras’s Review of Gravity’s Shadow.Harry Collins - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (1):151-153.
    Yves Gingras says of my book Gravity’s shadow that it is too long, the style is poor, and in its 870 pages there is nothing new that is not to be regretted. Gingras’s purity of vision would be a cause for congratulation were it not for the appalling implications of one of his claims. For the sake of the future of social science—indeed for the sake of the future of civilisation—it is impossible to leave unchallenged the idea that respondents, who (...)
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  50. Refining the Tacit.Harry Collins - 2013 - Philosophia Scientae 17:155-178.
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