13 found
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  1. Boundaryless Careers and Employability Obligations.Harry J. Van Buren Iii - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (2):131-149.
    Abstract:Boundaryless careers may be beneficial to people with rare and valuable skills, but might prove harmful to many others. The idea ofemployabilityas an ethical responsibility of employers to employees is introduced; it is argued that attention to employability in private practice and public policy partially resolves the ethical problems inherent to in boundaryless careers. Because employability programs are considered to be voluntary, some means of holding employers accountable for such responsibilities needs to be considered when discussing boundaryless careers. Implications for (...)
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  2.  6
    An Employee-Centered Model of Corporate Social Performance.Harry J. Van Buren Iii - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (4):687-709.
    Abstract:Although the concept of corporate social performance (CSP) has become more clearly specified in recent years, an analysis of CSP from the perspective of one particular stakeholder group has been largely ignored in this research: employees. It is proposed that employees merit specific attention with regard to assessments of corporate social performance. In this paper, a model for evaluating and measuring CSP at the employee level is proposed, and implications for evaluating contemporary employment policies and practices are offered. An iterative (...)
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  3.  18
    Stakeholder Voice: A Problem, a Solution and a Challenge for Managers and Academics.Harry J. Van Buren Iii & Michelle Greenwood - 2009 - Philosophy of Management 8 (3):15-23.
    The 25th anniversary of R. Edward Freeman’s Strategic Management: A Stakeholder Approach provides an opportunity to consider where stakeholder theory has been, where it is going, and how it might influence the behavior of academics conducting stakeholder-oriented research. We propose that Freeman’s early work on the stakeholder concept supports the normative claim that a stakeholder’s contribution to value creation implies a right to stakeholder voice with regard to how a corporation makes decisions. Failure to account for stakeholder voice (especially for (...)
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  4. Stakeholder Risk as Experienced by Non-Shareholder Stakeholders: An Ethical Analysis and Risk Magnitude Model.Whitney Davis & Harry J. Van Buren Iii - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:431-436.
    In this paper, we explore the interests of non-shareholder stakeholders in the context of a shareholder risk model. We first differentiate shareholders and nonshareholders with regard to the nature of their risks, their awareness of risks, their abilities to avoid risk, and their abilities to ensure compensation for risk. We then develop a model of measuring the risks facing stakeholders that addresses human risk magnitude and environmental risk magnitude. We conclude with implications for theory and practice.
     
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  5.  22
    Stages of Economic Development, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Civil Society.Harry J. Van Buren Iii & Jeanne M. Logsdon - 2006 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:170-172.
    This paper begins to examine the question of where societal expectations about the nature of corporate social responsibility come from. In particular, we begin to consider arguments about how a country’s stage of economic development affects the kinds of social responsibility expectations that firms face and then how the nature of a country’s civil society might affect CSR expectations. The factors that should be taken into account for future empirical research are also considered.
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    The Evolution of Corporate Social Responsibility in Mexico.Harry J. Van Buren Iii & Douglas E. Thomas - 2006 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:173-177.
    This paper begins to explore how corporate social responsibility (CSR) has evolved in Mexico. It looks at Mexico's social and political history to see the values that shaped expectations about how Mexican firms should address the needs and desires of their stakeholders in various periods in the 20th century. Particular attention is given to firms in Monterrey because they pioneered a form of company paternalism that reflected early CSR initiatives. Finally the paper briefly examines some contemporary CSR practices by large (...)
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    Stages of Economic Development, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Civil Society.Harry J. Van Buren Iii, Jeanne M. Logsdon & Douglas E. Thomas - 2006 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:170-172.
    This paper begins to examine the question of where societal expectations about the nature of corporate social responsibility come from. In particular, we begin to consider arguments about how a country’s stage of economic development affects the kinds of social responsibility expectations that firms face and then how the nature of a country’s civil society might affect CSR expectations. The factors that should be taken into account for future empirical research are also considered.
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  8.  25
    GLOBE Data in Business and Society Research?Jeanne M. Logsdon & Harry J. Van Buren Iii - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:530-533.
    This workshop was organized to explain the GLOBE database to IABS members and elicit interest in embarking upon a major study of national similarities anddifferences in corporate responsibility practices.
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  9.  14
    National Styles of Corporate Social Responsibility: Exploring Macro Influences on Responsible Business Behavior.Jeanne M. Logsdon & Harry J. Van Buren Iii - 2007 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:253-268.
    While the literature on corporate social responsibility suggests that its form and content differ at least somewhat from country to country, it has not begun to address whether CSR practices converge or diverge over time as countries benefit from higher levels of economic development, or whether these practices relate to specific cultural values and institutional structures. This paper proposes an initial conceptual model and propositions to begin to assess whether and how the different levels of economic development, cultural values, and (...)
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  10.  8
    Business and Human Rights.Michelle Westermann-Behaylo & Harry J. Van Buren Iii - 2011 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:99-110.
    One domain of corporate responsibility that is receiving considerable attention is whether and to what extent corporations have human rights obligations. The United Nations, through the work of Special Representative to the Secretary-General John Ruggie, has developed a framework seeking to clarify the responsibilities of businesses related to human rights. However, this framework adopts a limited, “do no harm” expectation for corporations that fails to capture the positive role that corporations can play in this social responsibility domain. In this paper (...)
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  11.  9
    Business Obligations for Human Rights.Michelle Westermann-Behaylo, Harry J. Van Buren Iii & Shawn L. Berman - 2011 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:189-201.
    While it is generally assumed that large corporations today give rhetorical support for basic human rights in public relations documents, skepticism continues toarise about the behavior of these firms. Do company actions support their rhetoric? This paper provides the initial analysis of our study of both rhetoric and practice regarding human rights in a small sample of large U.S. firms. At this point in the analysis, UNGC membership does not appear to have much influence on corporate rhetoric, but may be (...)
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  12.  20
    Enhancing Employee Voice: Are Voluntary Employer–Employee Partnerships Enough? [REVIEW]Harry J. Van Buren Iii & Michelle Greenwood - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):209-221.
    One of the essential ethical issues in the employment relationship is the loss of employee voice. Many of the ways employees have previously exercised voice in the employment relationship have been rendered less effective by (1) the changing nature of work, (2) employer preferences for flexibility that often work to the disadvantage of employees, and (3) changes in public policy and institutional systems that have failed to protect workers. We will begin with a discussion of how work has changed in (...)
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  13.  24
    Fairness and the Main Management Theories of the Twentieth Century: A Historical Review, 1900–1965. [REVIEW]Harry J. Van Buren Iii - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):633-644.
    Although not always termed “organizational justice,” the fairness of organizations has been a consistent concern of management thinkers. A review of the 1900–1965 time period indicates that management theorists primarily conceptualized organizational justice in utilitarian terms, although each theory emphasized distributive and procedural justice to different degrees. There is clearly a need for contemporary scholars to consider non-economic rationales for organizational justice, but the willingness of earlier scholars to make utilitarian arguments about organizational justice and productive efficiency helped legitimize the (...)
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