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  1.  8
    Enhancing Employee Voice: Are Voluntary Employer–Employee Partnerships Enough? [REVIEW]Harry J. Van Buren Iii & Michelle Greenwood - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):209-221.
    One of the essential ethical issues in the employment relationship is the loss of employee voice. Many of the ways employees have previously exercised voice in the employment relationship have been rendered less effective by (1) the changing nature of work, (2) employer preferences for flexibility that often work to the disadvantage of employees, and (3) changes in public policy and institutional systems that have failed to protect workers. We will begin with a discussion of how work has changed in (...)
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  2.  13
    Fairness and the Main Management Theories of the Twentieth Century: A Historical Review, 1900–1965. [REVIEW]Harry J. Van Buren Iii - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):633-644.
    Although not always termed “organizational justice,” the fairness of organizations has been a consistent concern of management thinkers. A review of the 1900–1965 time period indicates that management theorists primarily conceptualized organizational justice in utilitarian terms, although each theory emphasized distributive and procedural justice to different degrees. There is clearly a need for contemporary scholars to consider non-economic rationales for organizational justice, but the willingness of earlier scholars to make utilitarian arguments about organizational justice and productive efficiency helped legitimize the (...)
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  3.  6
    Stakeholder Risk as Experienced by Non-Shareholder Stakeholders: An Ethical Analysis and Risk Magnitude Model.Whitney Davis & Harry J. Van Buren Iii - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:431-436.
    In this paper, we explore the interests of non-shareholder stakeholders in the context of a shareholder risk model. We first differentiate shareholders and nonshareholders with regard to the nature of their risks, their awareness of risks, their abilities to avoid risk, and their abilities to ensure compensation for risk. We then develop a model of measuring the risks facing stakeholders that addresses human risk magnitude and environmental risk magnitude. We conclude with implications for theory and practice.
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  4.  74
    Boundaryless Careers and Employability Obligations.Harry J. Van Buren Iii - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (2):131-149.
    Boundaryless careers may be beneficial to people with rare and valuable skills, but might prove harmful to many others. The ideaof employability as an ethical responsibility of employers to employees is introduced; it is argued that attention to employability in privatepractice and public policy partially resolves the ethical problems inherent to in boundaryless careers. Because employability programsare considered to be voluntary, some means of holding employers accountable for such responsibilities needs to be considered whendiscussing boundaryless careers. Implications for practice and (...)
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