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Harvey S. James [39]Harvey S. James Jr [1]
  1.  41
    Reinforcing Ethical Decision Making Through Organizational Structure.Harvey S. James - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 28 (1):43 - 58.
    In this paper I examine how the constituent elements of a firm's organizational structure affect the ethical behavior of workers. The formal features of organizations I examine are the compensation practices, performance and evaluation systems, and decision-making assignments. I argue that the formal organizational structure, which is distinguished from corporate culture, is necessary, though not sufficient, in solving ethical problems within firms. At best the formal structure should not undermine the ethical actions of workers. When combined with a strong culture, (...)
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  2.  34
    The Ethics of Constrained Choice: How the Industrialization of Agriculture Impacts Farming and Farmer Behavior. [REVIEW]Mary K. Hendrickson & Harvey S. James - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (3):269-291.
    The industrialization of agriculture not only alters the ways in which agricultural production occurs, but it also impacts the decisions farmers make in important ways. First, constraints created by the economic environment of farming limit what options a farmer has available to him. Second, because of the industrialization of agriculture and the resulting economic pressures it creates for farmers, the fact that decisions are constrained creates new ethical challenges for farmers. Having fewer options when faced with severe economic pressures is (...)
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  3.  32
    On Finding Solutions to Ethical Problems in Agriculture.Harvey S. James - 2003 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (5):439-457.
    A distinction should be made betweentwo types of ethical problems. A Type I ethicalproblem is one in which there is no consensusas to what is ethical. A Type II ethicalproblem is one in which there is a consensus asto what is ethical, but incentives exist forindividuals to behave unethically. Type Iethical problems are resolved by making,challenging, and reasoning through moralarguments. Type II ethical problems areresolved by changing the institutionalenvironment so that people do not haveincentives to behave unethically. Type Isolutions, however, (...)
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  4.  49
    Sustainable Agriculture and Free Market Economics: Finding Common Ground in Adam Smith. [REVIEW]Harvey S. James - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):427-438.
    There are two competing approaches to sustainability in agriculture. One stresses a strict economic approach in which market forces should guide the activities of agricultural producers. The other advocates the need to balance economic with environmental and social objectives, even to the point of reducing profitability. The writings of the eighteenth century moral philosopher Adam Smith could bridge the debate. Smith certainly promoted profit-seeking, private property, and free market exchange consistent with the strict economic perspective. However, his writings are also (...)
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  5.  26
    When is a Bribe a Bribe? Teaching a Workable Definition of Bribery.Harvey S. James Jr - 2002 - Teaching Business Ethics 6 (2):199-217.
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  6.  3
    Power, Fairness and Constrained Choice in Agricultural Markets: A Synthesizing Framework.Mary K. Hendrickson & Harvey S. James - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (6):945-967.
    The fairness of agricultural markets is frequently invoked, especially by farmers. But fairness is difficult to define and measure. In this paper we link fairness and power with the concept of constrained choice to develop a framework for assessing fairness in agricultural markets. We use network exchange theory to define power from the dependencies that exist in agricultural networks. The structure of agricultural networks and the options that agricultural producers have to participate in agricultural networks affect the degree to which (...)
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  7.  31
    Are Farmers of the Middle Distinctively “Good Stewards”? Evidence From the Missouri Farm Poll, 2006.Harvey S. James & Mary K. Hendrickson - 2010 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (6):571-590.
    In this paper we consider the question of whether middle-scale farmers, which we define as producers generating between $100,000 and $250,000 in sales annually, are better agricultural stewards than small and large-scale producers. Our study is motivated by the argument of some commentators that farmers of this class ought to be protected in part because of the unique attitudes and values they possess regarding what constitutes a “good farmer.” We present results of a survey of Missouri farmers designed to assess (...)
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  8.  19
    Ethical Frameworks and Farmer Participation in Controversial Farming Practices.Sarika P. Cardoso & Harvey S. James - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):377-404.
    There are a number of agricultural farming practices that are controversial. These may include using chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides, and planting genetically modified crops, as well as the decision to dehorn cattle rather than raise polled cattle breeds. We use data from a survey of Missouri crop and livestock producers to determine whether a farmer’s ethical framework affects his or her decision to engage in these practices. We find that a plurality of farmers prefer an agricultural policy that reflects (...)
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  9.  28
    Using the Prisoner's Dilemma to Teach Business Ethics When Personal and Group Interests Conflict.Harvey S. James - 1998 - Teaching Business Ethics 2 (2):211-222.
  10.  21
    Agriculture and Human Values.Harvey S. James - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (2):135-136.
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  11.  25
    Agriculture and Human Values.Harvey S. James - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (3):285-286.
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  12.  35
    Self-Selection Bias In Business Ethics Research.Harvey S. James - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):559-578.
    Abstract: Suppose we want to know whether the ethics of persons with one characteristic differ from the ethics of persons having another characteristic. Self-selection bias occurs if people have control over that characteristic. When there is self-selection bias, we cannot be sure observed differences in ethics are correlated with the characteristic or are the result of individual self-selection. Self-selection bias is germane to many important business ethics questions. In this paper I explain what self-selection bias is, how it relates to (...)
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  13.  17
    Using Translational Research to Enhance Farmers’ Voice: A Case Study of the Potential Introduction of GM Cassava in Kenya’s Coast.Corinne Valdivia, M. Kengo Danda, Dekha Sheikh, Harvey S. James, Violet Gathaara, Grace Mbure, Festus Murithi & William Folk - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (4):673-681.
    Genetically modified cassava is currently being developed to address problems of diseases that threaten the food security of farmers in developing countries. The technologies are aimed at smallholder farmers, in hopes of reducing the vulnerability of cassava production to these diseases. In this paper we examine barriers to farmers’ voice in the development of GM cassava. We also examine the role of a translational research process to enhance farmers’ voice, to understand the sources of vulnerability farmers in a group in (...)
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  14.  16
    Anthony Winson: The Industrial Diet: The Degradation of Food and the Struggle for Healthy Eating.Harvey S. James - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (4):691-692.
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  15.  14
    Case Studies on Smallholder Farmer Voice: An Introduction to a Special Symposium.Harvey S. James & Iddisah Sulemana - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (4):637-641.
    In the spring of 2013, project leaders who received funding from the John Templeton Foundation’s program “Can GM Crops Help to Feed the World?” met in England to discuss progress on funded projects and to identify common objectives and research interests. The collection of essays in this special symposium is one outcome of that meeting. This introduction provides background on the symposium’s theme of understanding the challenges to smallholder farmers having a voice. Farmer voice is important not only in debates (...)
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  16.  14
    Jayson Lusk: The Food Police: A Well-Fed Manifesto About the Politics of Your Plate.Harvey S. James - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (4):661-662.
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  17.  2
    Self-Selection Bias In Business Ethics Research.Harvey S. James - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):559-577.
    Suppose we want to know whether the ethics of persons with one characteristic differ from the ethics of persons having anothercharacteristic. Self-selection bias occurs if people have control over that characteristic. When there is self-selection bias, we cannot be sure observed differences in ethics are correlated with the characteristic or are the result of individual self-selection. Self-selection bias is germane to many important business ethics questions. In this paper I explain what self-selection bias is, how it relates to business ethics (...)
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