Results for 'Hate speech Philosophy'

999 found
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  1.  23
    “A Burglar in the House of Philosophy”: Theodor Adorno and Drucilla Cornell and Hate Speech[REVIEW]Janice Richardson - 1999 - Feminist Legal Studies 7 (1):3-31.
  2. Hate Speech, the Priority of Liberty, and the Temptations of Nonideal Theory.Robert S. Taylor - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):353-68.
    Are government restrictions on hate speech consistent with the priority of liberty? This relatively narrow policy question will serve as the starting point for a wider discussion of the use and abuse of nonideal theory in contemporary political philosophy, especially as practiced on the academic left. I begin by showing that hate speech (understood as group libel) can undermine fair equality of opportunity for historically-oppressed groups but that the priority of liberty seems to forbid its (...)
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  3. The Cost of Free Speech: Pornography, Hate Speech, and Their Challenge to Liberalism.Abigail Levin - 2010 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
  4. Dignity, Harm, and Hate Speech.Robert Mark Simpson - 2013 - Law and Philosophy 32 (6):701-728.
    This paper examines two recent contributions to the hate speech literature – by Steven Heyman and Jeremy Waldron – which seek a justification for the legal restriction of hate speech in an account of the way that hate speech infringes against people’s dignity. These analyses look beyond the first-order hurts and disadvantages suffered by the immediate targets of hate speech, and consider the prospect of hate speech sustaining complex social structures (...)
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  5.  64
    ‘Won’T Somebody Please Think of the Children?’ Hate Speech, Harm, and Childhood.Robert Mark Simpson - 2019 - Law and Philosophy 38 (1):79-108.
    Some authors claim that hate speech plays a key role in perpetuating unjust social hierarchy. One prima facie plausible hypothesis about how this occurs is that hate speech has a pernicious influence on the attitudes of children. Here I argue that this hypothesis has an important part to play in the formulation of an especially robust case for general legal prohibitions on hate speech. If our account of the mechanism via which hate (...) effects its harms is built around claims about hate speech’s influence on children, then we will be better placed to acquire evidence that demonstrates the processes posited in our account, and better placed to ascribe responsibility for these harms to individuals who engage in hate speech. I briefly suggest some policy implications that come with developing an account of the harm of hate speech along these lines. (shrink)
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  6. Hate Speech and the Epistemology of Justice.Rae Langton - 2016 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (4):865-873.
    In ‘The Harm in Hate Speech’ Waldron’s most interesting and ground-breaking contribution lies in a distinctive epistemological role he assigns to hate speech legislation: it is necessary for assurance of justice, and thus for justice itself. He regards public social recognition of what is owed to citizens as a public good, contributing to basic dignity and social standing of citizens. His claim that hate speech in the public social environment damages assurance of justice has (...)
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  7. Hate Speech in Public Discourse: A Pessimistic Defense of Counterspeech.Maxime Lepoutre - 2017 - Social Theory and Practice 43 (4):851-883.
    Jeremy Waldron, among others, has forcefully argued that public hate speech assaults the dignity of its targets. Without denying this claim, I contend that it fails to establish that bans, rather than counterspeech, are the appropriate response. By articulating a more refined understanding of counterspeech, I suggest that counterspeech constitutes a better way of blocking hate speech’s dignitarian harm. In turn, I address two objections: according to the first, which draws on contemporary philosophy of language, (...)
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  8.  62
    What is Hate Speech? Part 1: The Myth of Hate.Alexander Brown - 2017 - Law and Philosophy 36 (4):419-468.
    The issue of hate speech has received significant attention from legal scholars and philosophers alike. But the vast majority of this attention has been focused on presenting and critically evaluating arguments for and against hate speech bans as opposed to the prior task of conceptually analysing the term ‘hate speech’ itself. This two-part article aims to put right that imbalance. It goes beyond legal texts and judgements and beyond the legal concept hate (...) in an attempt to understand the general concept hate speech. And it does so using a range of well-known methods of conceptual analysis that are distinctive of analytic philosophy. One of its main aims is to explode the myth that emotions, feelings, or attitudes of hate or hatred are part of the essential nature of hate speech. It also argues that hate speech is best conceived as a family resemblances concept. One important implication is that when looking at the full range of ways of combating hate speech, including but not limited to the use of criminal law, there is every reason to embrace an understanding of hate speech as a heterogeneous collection of expressive phenomena. Another is that it would be unsound to reject hate speech laws on the premise that they are effectively in the business of criminalising emotions, feelings, or attitudes of hate or hatred. (shrink)
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  9.  26
    What is Hate Speech? Part 2: Family Resemblances.Alexander Brown - 2017 - Law and Philosophy 36 (5):561-613.
    The issue of hate speech has received significant attention from legal scholars and philosophers alike. But the vast majority of this attention has been focused on presenting and critically evaluating arguments for and against hate speech bans as opposed to the prior task of conceptually analysing the term ‘hate speech’ itself. This two-part article aims to put right that imbalance. It goes beyond legal texts and judgements and beyond the legal concept hate (...) in an attempt to understand the general concept hate speech. And it does so using a range of well-known methods of conceptual analysis that are distinctive of analytic philosophy. One of its main aims is to explode the myth that emotions, feelings, or attitudes of hate or hatred are part of the essential nature of hate speech. It also argues that hate speech is best conceived as a family resemblances concept. One important implication is that when looking at the full range of ways of combating hate speech, including but not limited to the use of criminal law, there is every reason to embrace an understanding of hate speech as a heterogeneous collection of expressive phenomena. Another is that it would be unsound to reject hate speech laws on the premise that they are effectively in the business of criminalising emotions, feelings, or attitudes of hate or hatred. (shrink)
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  10.  21
    Moral Imagination in Education: A Deweyan Proposal for Teachers Responding to Hate Speech.Emma Arneback - 2014 - Journal of Moral Education 43 (3):269-281.
    This article is about moments when teachers experience hate speech in education and need to act. Based on John Dewey’s work on moral philosophy and examples from teaching practice, I would like to contribute to the discussion about moral education by emphasizing the following: the importance of experience, the problem with prescribed morals and the need for moral imagination in education. My Deweyan proposal for teachers responding to hate speech in education is to use moral (...)
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  11.  48
    Hate Speech and the Problems of Agency: A Critique of Butler.Kory Schaff - 2000 - Social Philosophy Today 16:185-201.
    At the center of the hate speech controversy is the question whether it constitutes conduct. If hate speech is not conduct, then restricting it runs counter to free speech. But even if it could be shown that it is a kind of conduct, complicated questions arise. Does it necessarily follow that we restrict speech? Practically speaking, can speech even be restricted, either through new legislation or the enforcement of existing laws regulating conduct? Are (...)
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  12.  80
    Hate Speech and the Problems of Agency.Kory Schaff - 2000 - Social Philosophy Today 16:185-201.
    At the center of the hate speech controversy is the question whether it constitutes conduct. If hate speech is not conduct, then restricting it runs counter to free speech. But even if it could be shown that it is a kind of conduct, complicated questions arise. Does it necessarily follow that we restrict speech? Practically speaking, can speech even be restricted, either through new legislation or the enforcement of existing laws regulating conduct? Are (...)
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  13.  30
    Differentiating Hate Speech: A Systemic Discrimination Approach.Katharine Gelber - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-22.
    In this paper I develop a systemic discrimination approach to defining a narrowly construed category of ‘hate speech’, as speech that harms to a sufficient degree to warrant government regulation. This is important due to the lack of definitional clarity, and the extraordinarily wide usage, of the term. This article extends current literature on how hate speech can harm by identifying under what circumstances speakers have the capacity to harm, and under what circumstances targets are (...)
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  14.  65
    Hate Speech and Distorted Communication: Rethinking the Limits of Incitement.Sarah Sorial - 2015 - Law and Philosophy 34 (3):299-324.
    Hate speech is commonly defined with reference to the legal category of incitement. Laws targeting incitement typically focus on how the speech is expressed rather than its actual content. This has a number of unintended consequences: first, law tends to capture overt or obvious forms of hate speech and not hate speech that takes the form of ‘reasoned’ argument, but which nevertheless, causes as much, if not more harm. Second, the focus on form (...)
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  15.  18
    State Speech Vs. Hate Speech: What to Do About Words That Wound?Michael Weinman - 2006 - Essays in Philosophy 7 (1):18.
    This is, indeed, another work on the subject of hate speech regulation in the United States. And yet, it is not just another such work. For my goal here is not to settle the jurisprudential arguments regarding the possibility of any specific hate speech regulation, either extant or yet to be conceived, withstanding a Constitutional test. Nor is it my intention to demonstrate, on the basis of a comparative study of existing legislation, that such regulation either (...)
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  16. Is the ‘Hate’ in Hate Speech the ‘Hate’ in Hate Crime? Waldron and Dworkin on Political Legitimacy.Rebecca Ruth Gould - 2019 - Jurisprudence 10 (2):171-187.
  17.  20
    Saunders, W. K. (2011), Degradation: What the History of Obscenity Tells Us About Hate Speech.Julija Perhat - 2012 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):111-116.
  18.  64
    The Hate That Dare Not Speak its Name: Pornography Qua Semi-Political Speech[REVIEW]Daniel I. A. Cohen - 1994 - Law and Philosophy 13 (2):195 - 239.
    In this essay we shall examine the contemporary jurisprudential thinking and legal precedents surrounding the issue of the sanctionability of pornography. We shall catalogue them by their logical presumptions, such as whether they view pornography as speech or act, whether they view pornography as obscenity, political hate-speech or anomalous other, whether they would scrutinize legislation governing pornography by a balancing of the harm of repression against the harm of permission, and who exactly they view as the victims.We (...)
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  19. Does Freedom of Speech Include Hate Speech?Caleb Yong - 2011 - Res Publica 17 (4):385-403.
    I take it that liberal justice recognises special protections against the restriction of speech and expression; this is what I call the Free Speech Principle. I ask if this Principle includes speech acts which might broadly be termed ‘hate speech’, where ‘includes’ is sensitive to the distinction between coverage and protection , and between speech that is regulable and speech that should be regulated . I suggest that ‘hate speech’ is too (...)
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  20. Hate Speech, Dignity and Self-Respect.Jonathan Seglow - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (5):1103-1116.
    This paper engages with the recent dignity-based argument against hate speech proposed by Jeremy Waldron. It’s claimed that while Waldron makes progress by conceptualising dignity less as an inherent property and more as a civic status which hate speech undermines, his argument is nonetheless subject to the problem that there are many sources of citizens’ dignitary status besides speech. Moreover, insofar as dignity informs the grounds of individuals’ right to free speech, Waldron’s argument leaves (...)
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  21.  20
    Responsibilities for Hateful Speech.Evan Simpson - 2006 - Legal Theory 12 (2):157-177.
    This essay consolidates some fragments of the contemporary theory of expressive freedoms, bringing together scattered conceptual distinctions (e.g., hurting and harming, tolerating and legitimating) and moves (e.g., the need to rectify hateful speech and to constrain harmful actions legally) into an account that is sensitive to the needs of abused groups but faithful to the libertarian tradition associated with Mill's harm principle. Accepting this principle as the fundamental condition warranting legal control of action, we explore legislative responsibilities for protecting (...)
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  22.  24
    Waldron, Jeremy., The Harm in Hate Speech: The Oliver Wendell Holmes Lectures.Paul Thomas - 2013 - Review of Metaphysics 66 (3):610-612.
  23. The Social Benefits of Protecting Hate Speech and Exposing Sources of Prejudice.Marcus Schulzke - 2016 - Res Publica 22 (2):225-242.
    I argue that there are strong consequentialist grounds for thinking that hate speech should be legally protected. The protection of hate speech allows those who are hateful to make their beliefs public, thereby exposing prejudices that might otherwise be suppressed to evaluation by other members of society. This greater transparency about prejudices has two social benefits. First, it facilitates social trust by making it easier to discover who holds beliefs that should exclude them from positions of (...)
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  24. Freedom of Political Speech, Hate Speech and the Argument From Democracy: The Transformative Contribution of Capabilities Theory.Katharine Gelber - 2010 - Contemporary Political Theory 9 (3):304-324.
    Much of the most influential free speech scholarship emphasises that ‘political speech’ warrants the very highest standards of protection because of its centrality to self-governance. This central idea mitigates against efforts to justify the regulation of political speech and renders some egregiously offensive or harmful speech worthy of protection from a theoretical perspective. Yet paradoxically, in practice, in many liberal democracies such speech is routinely restricted. In this paper, I develop an argument that is compatible (...)
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  25. Criminalizing Expression : Hate Speech and Obscenity.L. W. Sumner - 2011 - In John Deigh & David Dolinko (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of the Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.
     
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  26.  73
    Hate Speech, Illocution, and Social Context: A Critique of Judith Butler.Lisa H. Schwartzman - 2002 - Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (3):421–441.
  27.  17
    A Recognition-Sensitive Phenomenology of Hate Speech.Suzanne Whitten - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-21.
  28. Saunders, WK, Degradation: What the History of Obscenity Tells Us About Hate Speech; Heyman, JS, Free Speech and Human Dignity.Julija Perhat - 2012 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 34:111-116.
  29.  53
    Poststructuralism, Behaviorism and the Problem of Hate Speech.Carrie L. Hull - 2003 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 29 (5):517-535.
  30. Speech Acts: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language.John R. Searle - 1969 - Cambridge University Press.
    Written in an outstandingly clear and lively style, this 1969 book provokes its readers to rethink issues they may have regarded as long since settled.
  31.  10
    Linguistic Violence and the “Body to Come”: The Performativity of Hate Speech in J. Derrida and J. Butler.Julia Ponzio - 2018 - Semiotica 2018 (225):229-244.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Jahrgang: 2018 Heft: 225 Seiten: 229-244.
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  32.  3
    Hate and Racist Speech in the United States. A Critique.Gianfranco Pellegrino - forthcoming - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  33.  1
    Hate and Racist Speech in the United States. A Critique.Raphael Cohen-Almagor - forthcoming - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
  34.  10
    The Disputation of Hate: Speech Codes, Pluralism, and Academic Freedoms.Phil Cox - 1995 - Social Theory and Practice 21 (1):113-144.
  35. Pornography, Hate Speech, and Their Challenge to Dworkin's Egalitarian Liberalism.Abigail Levin - 2009 - Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (4):357-373.
    Contemporary egalitarian liberals—unlike their classical counterparts—have lived through many contentious events where the right to freedom of expression has been tested to its limits—the Skokie, Illinois, skinhead marches, hate speech incidents on college campuses, Internet pornography and hate speech sites, Holocaust deniers, and cross-burners, to name just a few. Despite this contemporary tumult, freedom of expression has been nearly unanimously affirmed in both the U.S. jurisprudence and philosophical discourse. In what follows, I will examine Ronald Dworkin's (...)
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  36. Philosophien Sprachlicher Gewalt: 21 Grundpositionen von Platon Bis Butler.Hannes Kuch & Steffen K. Herrmann (eds.) - 2010 - Velbrück Wissenschaft.
    Mit Sprache können wir nicht nur über Gewalt reden, mit Sprache können wir auch Gewalt zufügen. Der Band bietet eine systematische Erschließung dieser Gewalt der Sprache, indem er durch eine Vielzahl von Autorenportraits unterschiedliche Grundpositionen freilegt.
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  37. On Racist Hate Speech and the Scope of a Free Speech Principle.Mary Kate McGowan & Ishani Maitra - 2009 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 23 (2):343-372.
    In this paper, we argue that to properly understand our commitment to a principle of free speech, we must pay attention to what should count as speech for the purposes of such a principle. We defend the view that ‘speech’ here should be a technical term, with something other than its ordinary sense. We then offer a partial characterization of this technical sense. We contrast our view with some influential views about free speech , and show (...)
     
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  38.  91
    Woman‐Hating: On Misogyny, Sexism, and Hate Speech.Louise Richardson‐Self - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):256-272.
    Hate speech is one of the most important conceptual categories in anti-oppression politics today; a great deal of energy and political will is devoted to identifying, characterizing, contesting, and penalizing hate speech. However, despite the increasing inclusion of gender identity as a socially salient trait, antipatriarchal politics has largely been absent within this body of scholarship. Figuring out how to properly situate patriarchy-enforcing speech within the category of hate speech is therefore an important (...)
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  39.  63
    Truth and Speech Acts: Studies in the Philosophy of Language.Dirk Greimann & Geo Siegwart (eds.) - 2007 - Routledge.
    Whereas the relationship between truth and propositional content has already been intensively investigated, there are only very few studies devoted to the task of illuminating the relationship between truth and illocutionary acts. This book fills that gap. This innovative collection addresses such themes as: the relation between the concept of truth and the success conditions of assertions and kindred speech acts the linguistic devices of expressing the truth of a proposition the relation between predication and truth.
  40. Speech Acts, Meaning, and Intentions: Critical Approaches to the Philosophy of John R. Searle.Armin Burkhardt (ed.) - 1990 - W. De Gruyter.
    Introduction The analytical way of thinking has been one of the most fruitful paradigms in this century in philosophy and in different sciences, ...
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  41.  37
    Truth and Speech Acts: Studies in the Philosophy of Language.Robert Mößgen (ed.) - 2007 - Routledge.
    This innovative collection addresses such themes as: the relation between the concept of truth and the success conditions of assertions and kindred speech acts the linguistic devices of expressing the truth of a proposition the relation ...
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  42.  22
    Going Beyond Hate Speech: The Pragmatics of Ethnic Slur Terms.Björn Technau - 2018 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 14 (1):25-43.
    Ethnic slur terms and other group-based slurs must be differentiated from general pejoratives and pure expressives. As these terms pejoratively refer to certain groups of people, they are a typical feature of hate speech contexts where they serve xenophobic speakers in expressing their hatred for an entire group of people. However, slur terms are actually far more frequently used in other contexts and are more often exchanged among friends than between enemies. Hate speech can be identified (...)
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  43. Aesthetic Derogation: Hate Speech, Pornography, and Aesthetic Contexts,.Lynne Tirrell - 1999 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Aesthetics and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection. Cambridge University Press.
    Derogatory terms (racist, sexist, ethnic epithets) have long played various roles and achieved diverse ends in works of art. Focusing on basic aspects of an aesthetic object or work, this article examines the interpretive relation between point of view and content, asking how aesthetic contextualization shapes the impact of such terms. Can context, particularly aesthetic contexts, detach the derogatory force from powerful epithets and racist and sexist images? What would it be about aesthetic contexts that would make this possible? The (...)
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  44.  10
    In Search of Hate Speech in Lithuanian Public Discourse: A Corpus-Assisted Analysis of Online Comments.Jurate Ruzaite - 2018 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 14 (1):93-116.
    The present paper aims to report on the preliminary findings from the initial stages of ongoing research on hate speech in Lithuanian online comments. Comments are marked strongly by such phenomena as flaming and trolling; therefore, in this genre we can expect a high degree of hostility, obscenity, high incidence of insults and aggressive lexis, which can inflict harm to individuals or organizations. The goal of the current research is thus to make an attempt to identify some features (...)
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  45.  10
    Caught in the Cross-Fire: Tackling Hate Speech From the Perspective of Language and Translation Pedagogy.Jelena Vujić, Mirjana Daničić & Tamara Aralica - 2018 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 14 (1):203-223.
    Hate speech is a phenomenon which has been in the focus of scholarly interest of linguists, philosophers, sociologists, human-rights advocates, legal and media experts. Much of this interest has been devoted to establishing criteria for identifying what constitutes hate speech across disciplines. In this paper, we argue that hate speech has profiled as a distinct subgenre of the language of politics with typical patterns and ways of addressing which can be recognized in political campaigns (...)
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  46.  16
    What Is the Harm of Hate Speech?Eric Barendt - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (3):539-553.
    In Jeremy Waldron’s book, The Harm in Hate Speech, it is not always clear whether he argues that hate speech causes harm or whether it constitutes harm. This article considers this uncertainty, concluding that the best understanding of Waldron’s argument is that hate speech tends to cause harm - a weak form of the consequentialist case for its proscription. His argument is not advanced by his apparent reliance on speech-act theory.
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  47. Millian Principles, Freedom of Expression, and Hate Speech.David O. Brink - 2001 - Legal Theory 7 (2):119-157.
    Hate speech employs discriminatory epithets to insult and stigmatize others on the basis of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or other forms of group membership. The regulation of hate speech is deservedly controversial, in part because debates over hate speech seem to have teased apart libertarian and egalitarian strands within the liberal tradition. In the civil rights movements of the 1960s, libertarian concerns with freedom of movement and association and equal opportunity pointed in the (...)
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  48. Hate Speech on Social Media.Guiora Amos & A. Park Elizabeth - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (3):957-971.
    This essay expounds on Raphael Cohen-Almagor’s recent book, Confronting the Internet’s Dark Side, Moral and Social Responsibility on the Free Highway, and advocates placing narrow limitations on hate speech posted to social media websites. The Internet is a limitless platform for information and data sharing. It is, in addition, however, a low-cost, high-speed dissemination mechanism that facilitates the spreading of hate speech including violent and virtual threats. Indictment and prosecution for social media posts that transgress from (...)
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  49.  8
    Terrorist-Extremist Speech and Hate Speech: Understanding the Similarities and Differences.Katharine Gelber - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (3):607-622.
    The terms ‘hate’ and ‘hatred’ are increasingly used to describe the rationale of a kind of anti-Western terrorist-extremist speech. This discursively links this kind of terrorist-extremist speech with the well-known concept of ‘hate speech’, a link that suggests the two phenomena are more alike than they are unlike. In this article I interrogate the similarities and differences between anti-Western terrorist-extremist speech and hate speech as they manifest in Western liberal democratic states along (...)
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  50. Hate Speech Law: A Philosophical Examination.Alex Brown - 2015 - Routledge.
    Hate speech law can be found throughout the world. But it is also the subject of numerous principled arguments, both for and against. These principles invoke a host of morally relevant features and practical considerations . The book develops and then critically examines these various principled arguments. It also attempts to de-homogenize hate speech law into different clusters of laws/regulations/codes that constrain uses of hate speech, so as to facilitate a more nuanced examination of (...)
     
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