Order:
See also
Hayden Kee
Fordham University
  1.  12
    Phenomenology and Naturalism in Autopoietic and Radical Enactivism: Exploring Sense-Making and Continuity From the Top Down.Hayden Kee - forthcoming - Synthese:1-21.
    Radical and autopoietic enactivists disagree concerning how to understand the concept of sense-making in enactivist discourse and the extent of its distribution within the organic domain. I situate this debate within a broader conflict of commitments to naturalism on the part of radical enactivists, and to phenomenology on the part of autopoietic enactivists. I argue that autopoietic enactivists are in part responsible for the obscurity of the notion of sense-making by attributing it univocally to sentient and non-sentient beings and following (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  35
    Phenomenology and Ontology of Language and Expression: Merleau-Ponty on Speaking and Spoken Speech.Hayden Kee - 2018 - Human Studies 41 (3):415-435.
    This paper clarifies Merleau-Ponty’s distinction between speaking and spoken speech, and the relation between the two, in his Phenomenology of Perception. Against a common interpretation, I argue on exegetical and philosophical grounds that the distinction should not be understood as one between two kinds of speech, but rather between two internally related dimensions present in all speech. This suggests an interdependence between speaking and spoken aspects of speech, and some commentators have critiqued Merleau-Ponty for claiming a priority of speaking over (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  29
    Platonic and Aristotelian Influences in the Philosophy of Language: A Case for the Priority of the Cratylus.Hayden Kee - 2016 - Maritain Studies/Etudes Maritainiennes 32:72-82.
    Aristotle’s De Interpretatione has been referred to as the most influential text to be written in the history of semantics. I argue, however, that it is Plato who lays the foundation for subsequent reflection on signification. In the Cratylus, Plato confronts the two prevalent views of his time on the nature of the relationship between a name and a thing named: conventionalism, which holds that there is an arbitrary, imposed relationship between names and what they name; and naturalism, which holds (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  6
    Book Reviews for Issue 45:1.Leda Channer, Diego D'Angelo & Hayden Kee - 2014 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 45 (1):84-89.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark