Results for 'Health care'

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  1.  3
    Rationing Health Care in America: Perceptions and Principles of Justice.Larry R. Churchill - 1987
  2.  33
    Health Care Treatment Decision-Making Guidelines for Minors.Bioethics Center Midwest & Task Force on Health Care Rights for Minors - 1995 - Bioethics Forum 11 (4):A1.
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  3. Just Health Care.Norman Daniels - 1985 - Cambridge University Press.
    How should medical services be distributed within society? Who should pay for them? Is it right that large amounts should be spent on sophisticated technology and expensive operations, or would the resources be better employed in, for instance, less costly preventive measures? These and others are the questions addreses in this book. Norman Daniels examines some of the dilemmas thrown up by conflicting demands for medical attention, and goes on to advance a theory of justice in the distribution of (...) care. The central argument is that health care, both preventive and acute, has a crucial effect on equality of opportunity, and that a principle guaranteeing equality of opportunity must underly the distribution of health-care services. Access to care, preventive measures, treatment of the elderly, and the obligations of doctors and medical administrations are fully discussed, and the theory is shown to underwrite various practical policies in the area. (shrink)
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  4.  19
    Health Care Treatment Decision-Making Guidelines for Adults with Developmental Disabilities.Bioethics Center Midwest & Institute for Human Development Task Force on Health Care for Adults with Developmental Disabilities - 1996 - Bioethics Forum 12 (3):S - 1.
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  5.  10
    Setting Health-Care Priorities: A Reply to Tännsjö.Robert E. Goodin - 2020 - Diametros 18 (68):1-9.
    This paper firstly distinguishes between principles of “global justice” that apply the same anywhere and everywhere – Tännsjö’s utilitarianism, egalitarianism, prioritarianism and such like – and principles of “local justice” that apply within the specific sphere of health-care. Sometimes the latter might just be a special case of the former – but not always. Secondly, it discusses reasons, many psychological in nature, why physicians might devote excessive resources to prolonging life pointlessly, showing once again that those reasons might (...)
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  6.  59
    Health Care Ethics Consultation: An Update on Core Competencies and Emerging Standards From the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities' Core Competencies Update Task Force.Anita Tarzian - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (2):3-13.
    Ethics consultation has become an integral part of the fabric of U.S. health care delivery. This article summarizes the second edition of the Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultation report of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. The core knowledge and skills competencies identified in the first edition of Core Competencies have been adopted by various ethics consultation services and education programs, providing evidence of their endorsement as health care ethics consultation standards. (...)
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  7. Health Care, Capabilities, and AI Assistive Technologies.Mark Coeckelbergh - 2010 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (2):181-190.
    Scenarios involving the introduction of artificially intelligent (AI) assistive technologies in health care practices raise several ethical issues. In this paper, I discuss four objections to introducing AI assistive technologies in health care practices as replacements of human care. I analyse them as demands for felt care, good care, private care, and real care. I argue that although these objections cannot stand as good reasons for a general and a priori rejection (...)
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  8.  25
    Hope for Health and Health Care.William E. Stempsey - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (1):41-49.
    Virtually all activities of health care are motivated at some level by hope. Patients hope for a cure; for relief from pain; for a return home. Physicians hope to prevent illness in their patients; to make the correct diagnosis when illness presents itself; that their prescribed treatments will be effective. Researchers hope to learn more about the causes of illness; to discover new and more effective treatments; to understand how treatments work. Ultimately, all who work in health (...)
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  9. Conscientious Objection in Health Care: An Ethical Analysis.Mark R. Wicclair - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Historically associated with military service, conscientious objection has become a significant phenomenon in health care. Mark Wicclair offers a comprehensive ethical analysis of conscientious objection in three representative health care professions: medicine, nursing and pharmacy. He critically examines two extreme positions: the 'incompatibility thesis', that it is contrary to the professional obligations of practitioners to refuse provision of any service within the scope of their professional competence; and 'conscience absolutism', that they should be exempted from performing (...)
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  10.  21
    Just Health Care.Cheyney Ryan - 1990 - Philosophical Review 99 (2):287.
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  11. Health-Care Needs and Distributive Justice.Norman Daniels - 1981 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 10 (2):146-179.
  12.  26
    Aboriginal Health Care and Bioethics: A Reflection on the Teaching of the Seven Grandfathers.Jaro Kotalik & Gerry Martin - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (5):38-43.
    Contemporary bioethics recognizes the importance of the culture in shaping ethical issues, yet in practice, a process for ethical analysis and decision making is rarely adjusted to the culture and ethnicity of involved parties. This is of a particular concern in a health care system that is caring for a growing Aboriginal population. We raise the possibility of constructing a bioethics grounded in traditional Aboriginal knowledge. As an example of an element of traditional knowledge that contains strong ethical (...)
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  13.  6
    Conscience in Reproductive Health Care: Prioritizing Patient Interests.Carolyn McLeod - 2020 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Conscience in Reproductive Health Care responds to the growing worldwide trend of health care professionals conscientiously refusing to provide abortions and similar reproductive health services in countries where these services are legal and professionally accepted. Carolyn McLeod argues that conscientious objectors in health care should prioritize the interests of patients in receiving care over their own interest in acting on their conscience. She defends this "prioritizing approach" to conscientious objection over the more (...)
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  14.  3
    Setting Health-Care Priorities: A Reply to Massimo Reichlin.Torbjörn Tännsjö - forthcoming - Diametros.
    This is a short reply to Professor Reichlin’s comment on my book Setting Health-Care Priorities. What Ethical Theories Tell Us. The version of prioritarianism I rely on in the book is defended as the most plausible one. The general claim that there is convergence between all plausible theories on distributive justice is also defended with regard to assisted reproduction, disability, and enhancement.
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  15.  30
    Rural Health Care Ethics: Is There a Literature?William Nelson, Gili Lushkov, Andrew Pomerantz & William B. Weeks - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):44 – 50.
    To better understand the available publications addressing ethical issues in rural health care we sought to identify the ethics literature that specifically focuses on rural America. We wanted to determine the extent to which the rural ethics literature was distributed between general commentaries, descriptive summaries of research, and original research publications. We identified 55 publications that specifically and substantively addressed rural health care ethics, published between 1966 and 2004. Only 7 (13%) of these publications were original (...)
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  16.  31
    Health-Care Professionals’ Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviours Relating to Patient Capacity to Consent to Treatment.Scott Lamont, Yun-Hee Jeon & Mary Chiarella - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (6):684-707.
    This integrative review aims to provide a synthesis of research findings of health-care professionals’ knowledge, attitudes and behaviours relating to patient capacity to consent to or refuse treatment within the general hospital setting. Search strategies included relevant health databases, hand searching of key journals, ‘snowballing’ and expert recommendations. The review identified various knowledge gaps and attitudinal dispositions of health-care professionals, which influence their behaviours and decision-making in relation to capacity to consent processes. The findings suggest (...)
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  17. Health Care and Equality of Opportunity.Gopal Sreenivasan - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (2):21-31.
  18.  11
    Setting Health-Care Priorities. What Ethical Theories Tell Us. A Response to My Critics.Torbjörn Tännsjö - 2021 - Diametros 18 (68):60-70.
    The article provides answers to comments in this journal on my recent book, Setting Health-Care Priorities. What Ethical Theories Tell Us. Did I address all of the relevant theories? Yes, I did. Was my argument underdeveloped in any respects? Yes, at least in one as I should perhaps have discussed contractual ethical thinking more carefully. I do so in this response. Moreover, the critical comments raised have helped me to clarify my argument in many ways, for which I (...)
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  19.  9
    Pathocentric Health Care and a Minimal Internal Morality of Medicine.David B. Hershenov - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (1):16-27.
    Christopher Boorse is very skeptical of there being a pathocentric internal morality of medicine. Boorse argues that doctors have always engaged in activities other than healing, and so no internal morality of medicine can provide objections to euthanasia, contraception, sterilization, and other practices not aimed at fighting pathologies. Objections to these activities have to come from outside of medicine. I first argue that Boorse fails to appreciate that such widespread practices are compatible with medicine being essentially pathocentric. Then I contend (...)
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  20.  42
    Health (Care) and Human Rights: A Fundamental Conditions Approach.S. Liao - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (4):259-274.
    Many international declarations state that human beings have a human right to health care. However, is there a human right to health care? What grounds this right, and who has the corresponding duties to promote this right? Elsewhere, I have argued that human beings have human rights to the fundamental conditions for pursuing a good life. Drawing on this fundamental conditions approach of human rights, I offer a novel way of grounding a human right to (...) care. (shrink)
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  21. Health Care Resource Prioritization and Rationing: Why is It so Difficult?Dan W. Brock - 2007 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (1):125-148.
    Rationing is the allocation of a good under conditions of scarcity, which necessarily implies that some who want and could be benefitted by that good will not receive it. One reflection of our ambivalence towards health care rationing is reflected in our resistance to having it distributed in a market like most other goods—most Americans reject ability to pay as the basis for distributing health care. They do not view health care as just another (...)
     
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  22.  37
    Rationing Health Care in America: Perceptions and Principles of Justice. Larry R. Churchill. [REVIEW]Norman Daniels - 1989 - Ethics 99 (2):444-445.
    Churchill argues that every society rations health care-the problem is to do so justly. The central claim of the book is that a more "social" or communitarian starting point is needed. The book concludes with a brief discussion of health care rights and a sketchy account of the role of the physician in rationing.
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  23.  5
    Health Care Ethics Programs in U.S. Hospitals: Results From a National Survey.Christopher C. Duke, Anita Tarzian, Ellen Fox & Marion Danis - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-14.
    BackgroundAs hospitals have grown more complex, the ethical concerns they confront have grown correspondingly complicated. Many hospitals have consequently developed health care ethics programs that include far more than ethics consultation services alone. Yet systematic research on these programs is lacking.MethodsBased on a national, cross-sectional survey of a stratified sample of 600 US hospitals, we report on the prevalence, scope, activities, staffing, workload, financial compensation, and greatest challenges facing HCEPs.ResultsAmong 372 hospitals whose informants responded to an online survey, (...)
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  24.  1
    Health-Care Professionals and Lethal Injection: An Ethical Inquiry.Sarah K. Sawicki - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (1):18-31.
    The practice of health-care professional involvement in capital punishment has come under scrutiny since the implementation of lethal injection as a method of execution, raising questions of the goals of medicine and the ethics of medicalized procedures. The American Medical Association and other professional associations have issued statements prohibiting physician involvement in capital punishment because medicine is dedicated to preserving life. I address the three primary arguments against health-care professionals being involved in lethal injection and argue (...)
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  25.  25
    Health Care and Human Rights: Against the Split Duty Gambit.Gopal Sreenivasan - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (4):343-364.
    There are various grounds on which one may wish to distinguish a right to health care from a right to health. In this article, I review some old grounds before introducing some new grounds. But my central task is to argue that separating a right to health care from a right to health has objectionable consequences. I offer two main objections. The domestic objection is that separating the two rights prevents the state from fulfilling (...)
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  26. The Health Care Ethics Consultant.Françoise Baylis - 1994
     
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  27.  59
    Is Health Care (Still) Special?Shlomi Segall - 2007 - Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (3):342–361.
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  28. What Health Care Providers Know: A Taxonomy of Clinical Disagreements.Daniel Groll - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (5):27-36.
    When, if ever, can healthcare provider's lay claim to knowing what is best for their patients? In this paper, I offer a taxonomy of clinical disagreements. The taxonomy, I argue, reveals that healthcare providers often can lay claim to knowing what is best for their patients, but that oftentimes, they cannot do so *as* healthcare providers.
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  29.  34
    Teaching Health Care Ethics: Why We Should Teach Nursing and Medical Students Together.Stephen Hanson - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (2):167-176.
    This article argues that teaching medical and nursing students health care ethics in an interdisciplinary setting is beneficial for them. Doing so produces an education that is theoretically more consistent with the goals of health care ethics, can help to reduce moral stress and burnout, and can improve patient care. Based on a literature review, theoretical arguments and individual observation, this article will show that the benefits of interdisciplinary education, specifically in ethics, outweigh the difficulties (...)
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  30.  53
    Health Care Ethics Consultation: 'Training in Virtue'. [REVIEW]Françoise Baylis - 1999 - Human Studies 22 (1):25-41.
    In philosophy, intelligence is less important than character, or so Wittgenstein once argued. In this paper, in a similar vein, I suggest that in health care ethics consultation character is of preeminent importance. I suggest that the activity of ethics consultation can be understood as "training in virtue," and what distinguishes the good health care ethics consultant from his/her average colleague are differences in traits of character. The underlying assumption is that one's use of knowledge and (...)
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  31.  62
    Solidarity and Responsibility in Health Care.Ben Davies & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (2):133-144.
    Some healthcare systems are said to be grounded in solidarity because healthcare is funded as a form of mutual support. This article argues that health care systems that are grounded in solidarity have the right to penalise some users who are responsible for their poor health. This derives from the fact that solidary systems involve both rights and obligations and, in some cases, those who avoidably incur health burdens violate obligations of solidarity. Penalties warranted include direct (...)
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  32.  21
    Health Care Ethics in Canada.Françoise Baylis, Jocelyn Downie, Barry Hoffmaster & Susan Sherwin (eds.) - 2004 - Harcourt Brace.
    The third edition of Health Care Ethics in Canada builds on the commitment to Canadian content established in earlier editions without sacrificing breadth or rigor.
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  33.  13
    Health-Care Needs and Shared Decision-Making in Priority-Setting.Erik Gustavsson & Lars Sandman - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (1):13-22.
    In this paper we explore the relation between health-care needs and patients’ desires within shared decision-making in a context of priority setting in health care. We begin by outlining some general characteristics of the concept of health-care need as well as the notions of SDM and desire. Secondly we will discuss how to distinguish between needs and desires for health care. Thirdly we present three cases which all aim to bring out and (...)
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  34.  56
    Can Health Care Rationing Ever Be Rational?David A. Gruenewald - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (1):17-25.
    Americans' appetite for life-prolonging therapies has led to unsustainable growth in health care costs. It is tempting to target older people for health care rationing based on their disproportionate use of health care resources and lifespan already lived, but aged-based rationing is unacceptable to many. Systems reforms can improve the efficiency of health care and may lessen pressure to ration services, but difficult choices still must be made to limit expensive, marginally beneficial (...)
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  35.  19
    How Health Care Complexity Leads to Cooperation and Affects the Autonomy of Health Care Professionals.Eric Molleman, Manda Broekhuis, Renee Stoffels & Frans Jaspers - 2008 - Health Care Analysis 16 (4):329-341.
    Health professionals increasingly face patients with complex health problems and this pressurizes them to cooperate. The authors have analyzed how the complexity of health care problems relates to two types of cooperation: consultation and multidisciplinary teamwork (MTW). Moreover, they have analyzed the impact of these two types of cooperation on perceived professional autonomy. Two teams were studied, one team dealing with geriatric patients and another treating oncology patients. The authors conducted semi-structured interviews, studied written documents, held (...)
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  36. Seeking Better Health Care Outcomes: The Ethics of Using the “Nudge”.J. S. Blumenthal-Barby - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):1-10.
    Policymakers, employers, insurance companies, researchers, and health care providers have developed an increasing interest in using principles from behavioral economics and psychology to persuade people to change their health-related behaviors, lifestyles, and habits. In this article, we examine how principles from behavioral economics and psychology are being used to nudge people (the public, patients, or health care providers) toward particular decisions or behaviors related to health or health care, and we identify the (...)
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  37. Responsibility in Health Care: A Liberal Egalitarian Approach.A. W. Cappelen & O. F. Norheim - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (8):476-480.
    Lifestyle diseases constitute an increasing proportion of health problems and this trend is likely to continue. A better understanding of the responsibility argument is important for the assessment of policies aimed at meeting this challenge. Holding individuals accountable for their choices in the context of health care is, however, controversial. There are powerful arguments both for and against such policies. In this article the main arguments for and the traditional arguments against the use of individual responsibility as (...)
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  38.  49
    Health Care Ethics: Principles and Problems.Thomas M. Garrett (ed.) - 2009 - Prentice-Hall.
    This clear, accessible text/reference explores the full range of contemporary issues in health care ethics from a practical wisdom approach. The authors present the fundamental concerns of modern medical ethics–-autonomy, beneficence, justice, and confidentiality-–and then provide analysis, cases, and insights from professional literature to discuss them. Throughout, the discussion starts with larger issues or concepts and principles and then focuses on specific problems or complications.
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  39.  5
    Just Health Care.Anne Donchin - 1989 - Noûs 23 (5):697-699.
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  40. Beneficence, Justice, and Health Care.J. Paul Kelleher - 2014 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (1):27-49.
    This paper argues that societal duties of health promotion are underwritten (at least in large part) by a principle of beneficence. Further, this principle generates duties of justice that correlate with rights, not merely “imperfect” duties of charity or generosity. To support this argument, I draw on a useful distinction from bioethics and on a somewhat neglected approach to social obligation from political philosophy. The distinction is that between general and specific beneficence; and the approach from political philosophy has (...)
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  41.  24
    The Ethics of Health Care Rationing: An Introduction.Greg Bognar & Iwao Hirose - 2014 - Routledge.
    Should organ transplants be given to patients who have waited the longest, or need it most urgently, or those whose survival prospects are the best? The rationing of health care is universal and inevitable, taking place in poor and affluent countries, in publicly funded and private health care systems. Someone must budget for as well as dispense health care whilst aging populations severely stretch the availability of resources. The Ethics of Health Care (...)
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  42.  11
    Complicit Care: Health Care in Community.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2019 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    We intuitively think and talk about health care as a human right. Moreover, we tend to talk about health in the language of basic rights or human rights without a clear sense of what such rights mean, let alone whose duty it is to fulfill them. Additionally, in the care ethics literature, we tend to think of a dividing line between care and justice. In this dissertation I aim to draw care and justice together (...)
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  43.  36
    Health Care: A Brave New World.Shelley Morrisette, William D. Oberman, Allison D. Watts & Joseph B. Beck - 2015 - Health Care Analysis 23 (1):88-105.
    The current U.S. health care system, with both rising costs and demands, is unsustainable. The combination of a sense of individual entitlement to health care and limited acceptance of individual responsibility with respect to personal health has contributed to a system which overspends and underperforms. This sense of entitlement has its roots in a perceived right to health care. Beginning with the so-called moral right to health care, the issue of who (...)
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  44.  22
    Catholic Health Care: Rationale for Ministry.D. Brodeur - 1999 - Christian Bioethics 5 (1):5-25.
    This essay attempts to describe contemporary Catholic sponsored health care in the United States and to describe the purpose and structure of these particular Christian charitable organizations within the broader society. As health care has become more complex, critics claim that there is not a need for Catholic sponsored health care any longer. The author attempts to evaluate critically whether Catholic health care has a place in contemporary society. He reviews some salient (...)
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  45.  51
    Solidarity and Justice in Health Care. A Critical Analysis of Their Relationship.Ruud ter Meulen - 2015 - Diametros 43:1-20.
    This article tries to analyze the meaning and relevance of the concept of solidarity as compared to the concept of justice. While ‘justice’ refers to rights and duties , the concept of solidarity refers to relations of personal commitment and recognition . The article wants to answer the question whether solidarity and liberal justice should be seen as mutually exclusive or whether both approaches should be regarded as complementary to each other. The paper starts with an analysis of liberal theories (...)
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  46.  10
    Health Care Ethics: A Theological Analysis.Benedict M. Ashley - 1978 - Georgetown University Press.
    "Characterized by breadth of coverage, a refreshingly balanced approach to controversial issues, & a highly readable style."-Theological Studies.
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  47.  4
    Designing Health Care: A Community Health Science Solution for Reducing Health Disparities by Integrating Social Determinants and the Effects of Place.Mark J. DeHaven, Nora A. Gimpel, Daniel Gutierrez, Heather Kitzman‐Carmichael & Keri Revens - 2020 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 26 (5):1564-1572.
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  48. The Right to Health Care as a Right to Basic Human Functional Capabilities.Efrat Ram-Tiktin - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):337 - 351.
    A just social arrangement must guarantee a right to health care for all. This right should be understood as a positive right to basic human functional capabilities. The present article aims to delineate the right to health care as part of an account of distributive justice in health care in terms of the sufficiency of basic human functional capabilities. According to the proposed account, every individual currently living beneath the sufficiency threshold or in jeopardy (...)
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  49.  36
    Learning by Doing. Training Health Care Professionals to Become Facilitator of Moral Case Deliberation.Margreet Stolper, Bert Molewijk & Guy Widdershoven - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (1):47-59.
    Moral case deliberation is a dialogue among health care professionals about moral issues in practice. A trained facilitator moderates the dialogue, using a conversation method. Often, the facilitator is an ethicist. However, because of the growing interest in MCD and the need to connect MCD to practice, healthcare professionals should also become facilitators themselves. In order to transfer the facilitating expertise to health care professionals, a training program has been developed. This program enables professionals in (...) care institutions to acquire expertise in dealing with moral questions independent of the expertise of an ethicist. Over the past 10 years, we developed a training program with a specific mix of theory and practice, aiming to foster the right attitude, skills and knowledge of the trainee. The content and the didactics of the training developed in line with the philosophy of MCD: pragmatic hermeneutics, dialogical ethics and Socratic epistemology. Central principles are: ‘learning by doing’, ‘reflection instead of ready made knowledge’, and ‘dialogue on dialogue’. This paper describes the theoretical background and the didactic content of the current training. Furthermore, we present didactic tools which we developed for stimulating active learning. We also go into lessons we learned in developing the training. Next, we provide some preliminary data from evaluation research of the training program by participants. The discussion highlights crucial aspects of educating professionals to become facilitators of MCD. The paper ends with concluding remarks and a plea for more evaluative evidence of the effectiveness and meaning of this training program for doing MCD in institutions. (shrink)
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  50. Health Care Ethics.Stephen C. Taylor - 2018 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Health Care Ethics Health care ethics is the field of applied ethics that is concerned with the vast array of moral decision-making situations that arise in the practice of medicine in addition to the procedures and the policies that are designed to guide such practice. Of all of the aspects of the human body, and … Continue reading Health Care Ethics →.
     
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