Results for 'Healthcare ethics'

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  1.  85
    Introduction: Many Voices: Human Values in Healthcare Ethics.K. W. M. Fulford, D. Dickenson & T. H. Murray - 2002 - In K. W. M. Fulford, Donna Dickenson & Thomas H. Murray (eds.), Healthcare Ethics and Human Values: An Introductory Text with Readings and Case Studies. Blackwell.
    This edited volume illustrates the central importance of diversity of human values throughout healthcare. The readings are organised around the main stages of the clinical encounter from the patient's perspective. This introductory chapter opens up crucial issues of methodology and of practical application in this highly innovative approach to the role of ethics in healthcare.
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  2.  20
    Regulation of Healthcare Ethics Committees in Europe.Norbert Steinkamp, Bert Gordijn, Ana Borovecki, Eugenijus Gefenas, Jozef Glasa, Marc Guerrier, Tom Meulenbergs, Joanna Różyńska & Anne Slowther - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):461-475.
    In this article, the question is discussed if and how Healthcare Ethics Committees (HECs) should be regulated. The paper consists of two parts. First, authors from eight EC member countries describe the status quo in their respective countries, and give reasons as to the form of regulation they consider most adequate. In the second part, the country reports are analysed. It is suggested that regulation of HECs should be central and weak. Central regulation is argued to be apt (...)
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  3.  26
    Beyond Trail Blazing: A Roadmap for New Healthcare Ethics Leaders (and the People Who Hire Them). [REVIEW]Cheryl Cline, Andrea Frolic & Robert Sibbald - 2013 - HEC Forum 25 (3):211-227.
    This article is intended to serve as a roadmap to help new healthcare ethics leaders establish or renew an ethics program in a healthcare organization. The authors share a systemic step-by-step process for navigating this early career passage. In this paper, we describe five critical success strategies and provide explanations and concrete tools to help get you on the road to success as quickly and painlessly as possible. We will discuss how to define your role; diagnose (...)
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  4.  49
    Enriching Our Views on Clinical Ethics: Results of a Qualitative Study of the Moral Psychology of Healthcare Ethics Committee Members. [REVIEW]Eric Racine - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (1):57-67.
    The contribution of healthcare ethics committee (HEC) members to HECs is fundamental. However, little is known about how HEC members view clinical ethics. We report results from a qualitative study of the moral psychology of HEC members. We found that contrary to the existing Kohlberg-based studies, HEC members hold a pragmatic non-expert view of clinical ethics based mainly on respect for persons and a commitment to the patient’s good. In general, HEC members hold deflationary views regarding (...)
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  5.  17
    Conceptualizing Boundaries for the Professionalization of Healthcare Ethics Practice: A Call for Empirical Research.Nancy C. Brown & Summer Johnson McGee - 2014 - HEC Forum 26 (4):325-341.
    One of the challenges of modern healthcare ethics practice is the navigation of boundaries. Practicing healthcare ethicists in the performance of their role must navigate meanings, choices, decisions and actions embedded in complex cultural and social relationships amongst diverse individuals. In light of the evolving state of modern healthcare ethics practice and the recent move toward professionalization via certification, understanding boundary navigation in healthcare ethics practice is critical. Because healthcare ethics is (...)
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  6.  14
    For an Ethnomethodology of Healthcare Ethics.Nathan Emmerich - 2013 - Health Care Analysis 21 (4):372-389.
    This paper considers the utility of Ethnomethodology (EM) for the study of healthcare ethics as part of the empirical turn in Bioethics. I give a brief introduction to EM through its respecification of sociology, the specific view on the social world this generates and EM's posture of ‘indifference’. I then take a number of EM concepts and articulate each in the context of an EM study of healthcare ethics in professional practice. Having given an overview of (...)
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  7.  3
    Thinking About Difficulties: Using Poetry to Enhance Interpretative and Collaborative Skills in Healthcare Ethics Education.Amy Haddad - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):459-469.
    Viewing difficulty as an opportunity for learning runs counter to the common view of difficulty as a source of frustration and confusion. The aim of this article is to focus on the idea of difficulty as a stepping-off point for learning. The literature on difficulty in reading texts, and its impact on thinking and the interpretive process, serve as a foundation for the use of poetry in healthcare ethics education. Because of its complexity and strangeness compared to the (...)
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  8.  26
    Facilitating Healthcare Ethics Research: Assessement of Moral Reasoning and Moral Orientation From a Single Interview.Donnie J. Self & Joy D. Skeel - 1992 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (4):371.
    In recent years, the theoretical work of Gilligan in women's psychological development has led to the development of the concept of moral orientation or moral voice in contrast to the concept of moral reasoning or moral judgment developed by Kohlberg. These concepts have been of particular interest in gender studies, especially as applied to adolescence. These concepts of moral orientation and moral reasoning are being increasingly employed in healthcare ethics studies in a wide variety of settings. The recent (...)
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  9.  28
    Commentary: Mrs. J—Culture and Healthcare Ethics Committees.John R. Stone - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (4):537-540.
    The heart-rending story of Mrs. J raises many complex ethical issues. Key elements include suffering, disagreement, culture, religion, perspective, and facts. Overarching concerns include whose voices and stories should count, the connection of pain with suffering, and how healthcare ethics committees should respond.
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  10.  12
    Wisconsin Healthcare Ethics Committees.Robyn S. Shapiro, John P. Klein & Kristen A. Tym - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (3):288.
    Over the past two decades ethics committees have proliferated in healthcare institutions across the country. Catalysts for this growth include the endorsement of ethics committees by the New Jersey Supreme Court in the Quinlan case, by the President's Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Biomedical Research in its report entitled Deciding to Forgo Life Sustaining Medical Treatment, by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in its 1985 “Baby Doe” regulations, by numerous (...)
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  11.  19
    The Chiaroscuro of Accountability in the Second Edition of the Core Competencies for Healthcare Ethics Consultation.L. Rasmussen - 2013 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 24 (1):32-40.
    “Chiaroscuro” is a art technique that makes use of light and shade to suggest depth and solidity on a flat surface. I argue that the standards regarding accountability in the second edition of the Core Competencies for Healthcare Ethics Consultation , are chiaroscuro, because, despite the offered lists of competencies, it is very difficult to imagine how consultants might be held accountable to such standards. It is not clear to which of the many suggested standards a consultant should (...)
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  12.  37
    Managing Ethical Difficulties in Healthcare: Communicating in Inter-Professional Clinical Ethics Support Sessions.Catarina Fischer Grönlund, Vera Dahlqvist, Karin Zingmark, Mikael Sandlund & Anna Söderberg - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (4):321-338.
    Several studies show that healthcare professionals need to communicate inter-professionally in order to manage ethical difficulties. A model of clinical ethics support inspired by Habermas’ theory of discourse ethics has been developed by our research group. In this version of CES sessions healthcare professionals meet inter-professionally to communicate and reflect on ethical difficulties in a cooperative manner with the aim of reaching communicative agreement or reflective consensus. In order to understand the course of action during CES, (...)
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  13.  23
    Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees.D. Micah Hester & Toby Schonfeld (eds.) - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction to healthcare ethics committees / D. Micah Hester and Toby Schonfeld -- Brief introduction to ethics and ethical theory / D. Micah Hester and Toby Schonfeld -- Ethics committees and the law / Stephen Latham -- Cultural and ...
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  14.  75
    Moral Theory and Theorizing in Healthcare Ethics.Mike McNamee & Thomas Schramme - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (4):365-368.
    Moral Theory and Theorizing in Healthcare Ethics Content Type Journal Article Category Editorial Pages 365-368 DOI 10.1007/s10677-011-9291-x Authors Mike McNamee, College of Human and Health Sciences, Swansea, SA28PP UK Thomas Schramme, Universität Hamburg, Philosophisches Seminar, Von-Melle-Park 6, 20146 Hamburg, Germany Journal Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Online ISSN 1572-8447 Print ISSN 1386-2820 Journal Volume Volume 14 Journal Issue Volume 14, Number 4.
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  15.  11
    African Bioethics Vs. Healthcare Ethics in Africa: A Critique of Godfrey Tangwa.Ademola K. Fayemi - 2016 - Developing World Bioethics 16 (2):98-106.
    It is nearly two decades now since the publication of Godfrey Tangwa's article, ‘Bioethics: African Perspective’, without a critical review. His article is important because sequel to its publication in Bioethics, the idea of ‘African bioethics’ started gaining some attention in the international bioethics literature. This paper breaks this relative silence by critically examining Tangwa's claim on the existence of African bioethics. Employing conceptual and critical methods, this paper argues that Tangwa's account of African bioethics has some conceptual, methodic and (...)
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  16.  8
    Humane Healthcare as a Theme for Social Ethics.Martien Pijnenburg - 2002 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (3):245-252.
    The concept of ‘humane healthcare’ cannot and may not be limited to a personal virtue. For elucidating its meaning and making it functional as a critical ethical criterion for healthcare as a social institution, it is necessary to reflect on the social, cultural, and historical conditions in which modern healthcare finds its offspring and its further development. Doing this is the object and aim of social ethics. Social ethics in itself covers a broad area of different (...)
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  17.  22
    Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice of Healthcare Ethics and Law Among Doctors and Nurses in Barbados.Seetharaman Hariharan, Ramesh Jonnalagadda, Errol Walrond & Harley Moseley - 2006 - BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-9.
    Background The aim of the study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices among healthcare professionals in Barbados in relation to healthcare ethics and law in an attempt to assist in guiding their professional conduct and aid in curriculum development. Methods A self-administered structured questionnaire about knowledge of healthcare ethics, law and the role of an Ethics Committee in the healthcare system was devised, tested and distributed to all levels of staff at (...)
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  18.  13
    Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Healthcare Ethics Among Resident Doctors and Ward Nurses From a Resource Poor Setting, Nepal.Samaj Adhikari, Kumar Paudel, Arja R. Aro, Tara Ballav Adhikari, Bipin Adhikari & Shiva Raj Mishra - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):68.
    BackgroundHealthcare ethics is neglected in clinical practice in LMICs such as Nepal. The main objective of this study was to assess the current status of knowledge, attitude and practice of healthcare ethics among resident doctors and ward nurses in a tertiary teaching hospital in Nepal.MethodsThis was a cross sectional study conducted among resident doctors and ward nurses in the largest tertiary care teaching hospital of Nepal during January- February 2016 with a self-administered questionnaire. A Cramer’s V value (...)
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  19.  6
    A Proposed Rural Healthcare Ethics Agenda.W. Nelson, A. Pomerantz, K. Howard & A. Bushy - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (3):136-139.
    The unique context of the rural setting provides special challenges to furnishing ethical healthcare to its approximately 62 million inhabitants. Although rural communities are widely diverse, most have the following common features: limited economic resources, shared values, reduced health status, limited availability of and accessibility to healthcare services, overlapping professional–patient relationships and care giver stress. These rural features shape common healthcare ethical issues, including threats to confidentiality, boundary issues, professional–patient relationship and allocation of resources. To date, there (...)
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  20.  18
    The ASBH Code of Ethics and the Limits of Professional Healthcare Ethics Consultations.Abraham Schwab - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (8):medethics-2015-103074.
    From the beginning, a code of ethics for bioethicists has been conceived of as part of a movement to professionalise the field. In advocating for such a code, Baker repeatedly identifies 'having a code of ethics' with 'professionalization'. The American Society of Bioethics and Humanities echoes this view in their code of ethics for healthcare ethics consultants 1 and the subsequent publication in the American Journal of Bioethics.2 Taking for granted that a code of (...) could be a valuable asset for HCECs, this essay has two aims. First, there are good reasons to doubt that the label 'profession' has significant meaning for HCECs. Attempts to accurately conceive of a profession fall into two broad camps: substantive and formal. Substantive conceptions should be rejected. Specifically, substantive conceptions beg the question about what it means to be a profession, which produces devastating problems for practical application. Formal conceptions of profession avoid begging the question, but do so at the cost of identifying the responsibilities of a profession. Using the term 'professional responsibilities', then, requires additional explication and classifying HCECs as professionals requires the identification of their role-specific responsibilities.i Second, this essay will critique the ASBH code of ethics for HCECs as a first articulation of these responsibilities. As written, this code of ethics has limited value for HCECs because most of the responsibilities identified in this code do not identify HCEC-specific responsibilities. In closing, some important strategies to improve upon this initial attempt to define the responsibilities of HCECs are identified. (shrink)
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  21.  31
    Life and Death in Healthcare Ethics: A Short Introduction: H Watt. Routledge, 2000, Pound7.99, Vii + 97pp. ISBN 0-415-21574-. [REVIEW]Jacqueline A. Laing - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (2):122-122.
    There is currently a dearth of bioethical literature presenting what might be called a more traditional approach to medicine and health care. Life and Death in Healthcare Ethics promises a reasoned and clear alternative. It considers ethical concerns raised by reproduction and death and dying. The issues considered include euthanasia and withdrawal of treatment, the persistent vegetative state, abortion, cloning and in vitro fertilization. Given its clarity and simplicity the book is likely to be read eagerly by students (...)
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  22.  13
    Healthcare Ethics in Finland.Tuija Takala & Pekka Louhiala - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (3):256-260.
    Finland is a country in Northern Europe with a population of approximately 5.1 million people. It lies between Sweden and Russia and has a border with Norway too. It is part of the European Union and also belongs to the European Monetary Union. It is a welfare state in the sense that healthcare services, schools, universities, and social services are for the most part paid for by tax-based funding. In terms of basic healthcare, the state, through local municipalities, (...)
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  23.  15
    Healthcare Ethics in Finland: A Follow-Up.Pekka Louhiala & Tuija Takala - 2004 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (3):236-240.
    Last year we reported that there are no professorships in medical ethics in Finland. This year we are happy to report that a chair in medical ethics has now been advertised at the University of Turku. We also gave details about the attempts to come up with a law on assisted reproduction. As predicted, there were problems, and eventually the proposal was withdrawn, leaving Finland still without a law on assisted reproduction. The talk on large-scale genetic databases has (...)
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  24.  7
    HCEC Pearls and Pitfalls: Suggested Do's and Don't's for Healthcare Ethics Consultants.Joseph A. Carrese, A. H. Antommaria, K. A. Berkowitz, J. Berger, J. Carrese, B. H. Childs, A. R. Derse, C. Gallagher, J. A. Gallagher & P. Goodman-Crews - 2012 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (3):234-240.
    Members of the Clinical Ethics Consultation Affairs Standing Committee of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities present a collection of insights and recommendations developed from their collective experience, intended for those engaged in the work of healthcare ethics consultation.
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  25.  4
    Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Healthcare Ethics Among Resident Doctors and Ward Nurses From a Resource Poor Setting, Nepal.Kumar Paudel Samaj Adhikari, R. Aro Arja, Bipin Adhikari Tara Ballav Adhikari & Shiva Raj Mishra - forthcoming - Most Recent Articles: Bmc Medical Ethics.
    Healthcare ethics is neglected in clinical practice in LMICs such as Nepal. The main objective of this study was to assess the current status of knowledge, attitude and practi...
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  26.  2
    What the HEC-C? An Analysis of the Healthcare Ethics Consultant-Certified Program: One Year In.Janet Malek, Sophia Fantus, Andrew Childress & Claire Horner - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (3):9-18.
    Efforts to professionalize the field of bioethics have led to the development of the Healthcare Ethics Consultant-Certified Program intended to credential practicing healthcare ethics consultants. Our team of professional ethicists participated in the inaugural process to support the professionalization efforts and inform our views on the value of this credential from the perspective of ethics consultants. In this paper, we explore the history that has led to this certification process, and evaluate the ability of the (...)
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  27.  13
    The Current State of Clinical Ethics and Healthcare Ethics Committees in Belgium.T. Meulenbergs - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (6):318-321.
    Ethics committees are the most important practical instrument of clinical ethics in Belgium and fulfil three tasks: the ethical review of experimental protocols, advising on the ethical aspects of healthcare practice, and ethics consultation. In this article the authors examine the current situation of ethics committees in Belgium from the perspective of clinical ethics. Firstly, the most important steps which thus far have been taken in Belgium are examined. Secondly, recent opinion by the Belgian (...)
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  28.  43
    Rural Healthcare Ethics: No Longer the Forgotten Quarter.William Nelson, Mary Ann Greene & Alan West - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (4):510-517.
    The rural health context in the United States presents unique ethical challenges to its approximately 60 million residents, who represent about one quarter of the overall population and are distributed over three-quarters of the country’s land mass. The rural context is not only identified by the small population density and distance to an urban setting but also by a combination of social, religious, geographical, and cultural factors. Living in a rural setting fosters a sense of shared values and beliefs, a (...)
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  29.  34
    Developing a Model of Healthcare Ethics Support in Croatia.Ana Borovečki, Ksenija Makar-aus̆perger, Igor Francetić, Sanja Babić-Bosnac, Bert Gordijn, Norbert Steinkamp & Stjepan Orešković - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (3):395-401.
  30.  13
    Philosophy of Healthcare Ethics Practice Statements: Quality Attestation and Beyond.Lauren Notini - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (4):341-360.
    One element of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities’ recently-piloted quality attestation portfolio for clinical ethics consultants is a “philosophy of clinical ethics consultation statement” describing the candidate’s approach to clinical ethics consultation. To date, these statements have been under-explored in the literature, in contrast to philosophy statements in other fields such as academic teaching. In this article, I argue there is merit in expanding the content of these statements beyond clinical ethics consultation alone to (...)
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  31.  16
    Introduction to Healthcare Ethics Committees.D. Micah Hester & Toby Schonfeld - 2012 - In D. Micah Hester & Toby Schonfeld (eds.), Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees. Cambridge University Press. pp. 1.
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  32.  23
    Toleration and Healthcare Ethics.Raanan Gillon - 2005 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (1):100-106.
    edited by Tuija Takala and Matti Häyry, welcomes contributions on the conceptual and theoretical dimensions of bioethics.
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  33.  7
    The Healthcare Ethics Committee as Educator.Kathy Kinlaw - 2012 - In D. Micah Hester & Toby Schonfeld (eds.), Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees. Cambridge University Press. pp. 155.
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  34.  3
    The Just War Tradition: A Model for Healthcare Ethics.Chaplain Connolly - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (2):133-152.
    Healthcare ethics committees, physicians, surgeons, nurses, families, and patients themselves are constantly under pressure to make appropriate medically ethical decisions concerning patient care. Various models for healthcare ethics decisions have been proposed throughout the years, but by and large they are focused on making the initial ethical decision. What follows is a proposed model for healthcare ethics that considers the most appropriate decisions before, during, and after any intervention. The Just War Tradition is a (...)
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  35.  54
    Business Ethics, Stakeholder Theory, and the Ethics of Healthcare Organizations.Patricia H. Werhane - 2000 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (2):169-181.
    Until recently, business issues in healthcare organizations were relatively insulated from clinical issues, for several reasons. The hospital at earlier stages of its development operated on a combination of charitable and equitable premises, allowing for providing care to be separated from financial support. Physicians, who were primarily responsible for clinical care, constituted an independent power nexus within the hospital and were governed by their own professional codes of ethics. In exchange for a great deal of control over their (...)
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  36.  37
    A Comparison Of Student Performance Between Two Instructional Delivery Methods For A Healthcare Ethics Course.Hugh A. Stoddard & Toby Schonfeld - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (3):493-501.
    Healthcare ethics has become part of the standard curriculum of students in the health professions. The goals of healthcare ethics education are to give students the skills they need to identify, assess, and address ethical issues in clinical practice and to develop virtuous practitioners. Incorporating the medical humanities into medical school, for example, is intended to foster empathy and professionalism among students and to provide mechanisms for enhanced physician well-being. Yet, despite the long-standing inclusion of the (...)
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  37.  57
    Organization Ethics in Healthcare.Patricia H. Werhane & Mary V. Rorty - 2000 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (2):145-146.
    Bioethics, clinical ethics, and professional ethics are mature, well-developed fields of applied ethics that focus on medical research, patient autonomy and patient care, patient–healthcare professional relationships, and issues that arise in clinical and other medical settings. However, despite these developments, little attention has been paid to the organizational aspects of healthcare in these fields. This is surprising, because in the last 30 years healthcare has become more and more institutionalized in provider, management, and insurer (...)
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  38.  22
    Ethics Without Walls: The Transformation of Ethics Committees in the New Healthcare Environment.Kate T. Christensen & Robin Tucker - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (3):299.
    As the structure of healthcare delivery undergoes a breathtaking transformation, many ethics committees are wondering how and if they will be affected. Although the impact has not yet been widely felt, hospital-based ethics committees cannot avoid the pressures and upheaval caused by the reorganization of healthcare. This article will briefly review some of the factors contributing to the transformation of medicine, and suggest a number of ways in which ethics committees can respond proactively.
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  39.  29
    Healthcare Ethics: A Patient-Centered Decision Model. [REVIEW]Alfonso R. Oddo - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 29 (1-2):125 - 134.
    A common financial model used in business decisions is the cost/benefit comparison. The costs of a proposed project are compared with the benefits, and if the benefits outweigh the costs, the project is accepted; if the costs exceed the benefits, the project is rejected. This model is applicable when tangible costs and benefits can be reasonably measured in monetary units. However, it is difficult to consider intangible factors in this model because intangible factors cannot be readily quantified in money.While some (...)
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  40.  83
    Health and the Good Society: Setting Healthcare Ethics in Social Context.Alan Cribb - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    What is health policy for? In Health and the Good Society, Alan Cribb addresses this question in a way that cuts across disciplinary boundaries. His core argument is that biomedical ethics should draw upon public health values and ethics; specifically, he argues that everybody has some share of responsibility for health, including a responsibility for promoting greater health equality. In the process, Cribb argues for a major rethink of the whole project of health education.
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  41. Healthcare Ethics and Human Values: An Introductory Text with Readings and Case Studies.K. W. M. Fulford, Donna Dickenson & Thomas H. Murray (eds.) - 2002 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This volume illustrates the central importance of diversity of human values throughout healthcare. The readings are organized around the main stages of the clinical encounter from the patient's perspective. They run from staying well and 'first contact' through to either recovery or to long-term illness, death and dying.
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  42. The Role of Healthcare Ethics Committee Networks in Shaping Healthcare Policy and Practices.Anita J. Tarzian, Diane E. Hoffmann, Rose Mary Volbrecht & Judy L. Meyers - 2006 - HEC Forum 18 (1):85-94.
    As national and state health care policy -making becomes contentious and complex, there is a need for a forum to debate and explore public concerns and values in health care, give voice to local citizens, to facilitate consensus among various stakeholders, and provide feedback and direction to health care institutions and policy makers. This paper explores the role that regional health care ethics committees can play and provides two contrasting examples of Networks involved in facilitation of public input into (...)
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  43.  26
    Life and Death in Healthcare Ethics.Jacqueline A. Laing - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):331.
  44.  59
    Role Conflict, Mindfulness, and Organizational Ethics in an Education-Based Healthcare Institution.Sean Valentine, Lynn Godkin & Philip E. Varca - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (3):455 - 469.
    Role conflict occurs when a job possesses inconsistent expectations incongruent with individual beliefs, a situation that precipitates considerable frustration and other negative work outcomes. Increasing interest in processes that reduce role conflict is, therefore, witnessed. With the help of information collected from a large sample of individuals employed at an education-based healthcare institution, this study identified several factors that might decrease role conflict, namely mindfulness and organizational ethics. In particular, the results indicated that mindfulness was associated with decreased (...)
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  45.  35
    The Impact of Committee Caracteristics on the Success of Healthcare Ethics Committees.Lin Guo & Ida C. Schick - 2003 - HEC Forum 15 (3):287-299.
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  46.  16
    The Healthcare Ethics Committee in the Structural Transformation of Health Care: Administrative and Organizational Ethics in Changing Times. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Heitman & Ruth Ellen Bulger - 1998 - HEC Forum 10 (2):152-176.
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  47.  21
    Are Healthcare Ethics Committees Necessary in Rural Hospitals?Ann Cook & Helena Hoas - 1999 - HEC Forum 11 (2):134-139.
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  48.  16
    Healthcare Ethics Committees' Contribution to Review of Institutional Policy.Carolyn Ells - 2006 - HEC Forum 18 (3):265-275.
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  49.  12
    Is "Failure to Thrive" Syndrome Relevant to Lithuanian Healthcare Ethics Committees?Eugenijus Gefenas - 2001 - HEC Forum 13 (4):381-392.
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  50.  14
    From Boardroom to Bedside: A Comprehensive Organizational Healthcare Ethics[REVIEW]Brian H. Childs - 2000 - HEC Forum 12 (3):235-249.
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