Results for 'Hearing'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
Bibliography: Hearing in Philosophy of Mind
  1. Experience, Explanation, and Faith an Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion /Anthony O'hear. --. --.Anthony O'hear - 1984 - Routledge & K. Paul, 1984.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  8
    Imprisonment: Anthony O'Hear.Anthony O'hear - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 18:203-220.
    It is appropriate that a lecture in a series on ‘Philosophy and Practice’ should open by considering Bentham's ideas on imprisonment. For Bentham, incontestably a philosopher, was equally incontestably a practical reformer. This, indeed, is a received idea among philosophers; that is to say, most philosophers know that Bentham designed ‘a model prison of novel design’, but few have actually considered the design, its implications or its effects. Most are content, like Warnock, with observing that the panopticon plan was formally (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  6
    Father of Child-Centredness: John Dewey and the Ideology of Modern Education.Anthony O'Hear - 1991
  4.  50
    Logic, Thought and Language.Anthony O'Hear (ed.) - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Original essays by leading philosophers on topics of logic, thought and language.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  5. 15 Hearing and Hallucinating Silence.Ian Phillips - 2013 - In Fiona Macpherson & Dimitris Platchias (eds.), Hallucination. MIT Press. pp. 333.
    Tradition has it that, although we experience darkness, we can neither hear nor hallucinate silence. At most, we hear that it is silent, in virtue of lacking auditory experience. This cognitive view is at odds with our ordinary thought and talk. Yet it is not easy to vouchsafe the perception of silence: Sorensen‘s recent account entails the implausible claim that the permanently and profoundly deaf are perpetually hallucinating silence. To better defend the view that we can genuinely hear and hallucinate (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  6. Hearing colors, tasting shapes.Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Edward M. Hubbard - 2003 - Scientific American (May):52-59.
    Jones and Coleman are among a handful of otherwise normal as a child and the number 5 was red and 6 was green. This the- people who have synesthesia. They experience the ordinary ory does not answer why only some people retain such vivid world in extraordinary ways and seem to inhabit a mysterious sensory memories, however. You might _think _of cold when you no-man’s-land between fantasy and reality. For them the sens- look at a picture of an ice cube, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  7.  3
    Philosophy, the Good, the True and the Beautiful.Anthony O'Hear & Professor of Philosophy Anthony O'Hear (eds.) - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    Discussions of value play a central role in contemporary philosophy. This book considers the role of values in truth seeking, in morality, in aesthetics and also in the spiritual life. The distinguished contributors include Simon Blackburn, Jonathan Dancy, Paul Horwich, John Leslie, Timothy Sprigge, and David Wiggins.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8.  16
    Hearing Things: Voice and Method in the Writing of Stanley Cavell.Timothy Gould - 1998 - University of Chicago Press.
    Hearing Things is the first work to treat systematically the relation between Cavell's pervasive authorial voice and his equally powerful, though less discernible, impulse to produce a set of usable philosophical methods.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  9.  75
    Hearing Spaces.Nick Young - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (2):242-255.
    In this paper I argue that empty space can be heard. This position contrasts with the generally held view that the only things that can be heard are sounds, their properties, echoes, and perhaps sound sources. Specifically, I suggest that when sounds reverberate in enclosed environments we auditorily represent the volume of space surrounding us. Clearly, we can learn the approximate size of an enclosed space through hearing a sound reverberate within it, and so any account that denies that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  10.  3
    Hearing, sound, and the auditory in ancient Greece.Jill Gordon (ed.) - 2022 - Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press.
    Hearing, Sound, and the Auditory in Ancient Greece represents the first comprehensive study of the role of sound and hearing in the ancient Greek world. While our modern western culture is almost an entirely visual one, hearing and sound were central to ancient Greeks. The fifteen chapters of this edited volume explore "hearing" as being philosophically significant across numerous texts and figures in ancient Greek philosophy. Through close analysis of the philosophy of such figures as Heraclitus, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  64
    O’Hear on Popper, Criticism and the Open Society.Danny Frederick - 2019 - Cosmos + Taxis 6 (6-7):43-48.
    Karl Popper champions an open society in which all institutions, principles and values are open to criticism. Anthony O’Hear contends that Popper’s vision is utopian because an open society can survive only if some non-liberal values are assumed, including the prohibition of criticism of fundamental liberal principles and values. I correct O’Hear’s interpretation of Popper and I rebut most of his criticisms, arguing that an open society is stronger if it permits criticism of all views. However, I accept and strengthen (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Hearing silence: The perception and introspection of absences.Roy Sorenson - 2009 - In Matthew Nudds & Casey O'Callaghan (eds.), Sounds and Perception. Oxford University Press.
    in Sounds and Perception: New Philosophical Essays, ed. by Matthew Nudds and Casey O’Callaghan (Oxford University Press, forthcoming in 2008).
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  13. Hearing the Difference: Theorizing Connection.Carol Gilligan - 1995 - Hypatia 10 (2):120 - 127.
    Hearing the difference between a patriarchal voice and a relational voice defines a paradigm shift: a change in the conception of the human world. Theorizing connection as primary and fundamental in human life leads to a new psychology, which shifts the grounds for philosophy and political theory. A crucial distinction is made between a feminine ethic of care and a feminist ethic of care. Voice, relationship, resistance, and women become central rather than peripheral in this reframing of the human (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  14.  39
    Hearing Bad News.Janice Morse - 2011 - Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (3):187-211.
    Personal reports of receiving bad news provide data that describes patients’ comprehension, reflections, experienced emotions, and an interpretative commentary with the wisdom of hindsight. Analysis of autobiographical accounts of “hearing bad news” enables the identification of patterns of how patients found out diagnoses, buffering techniques used, and styles of receiving the news. I describe how patients grapple with the news, their somatic responses to hearing, and how they struggle and strive to accept what they are hearing. I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  86
    Hearing objects and events.Nick Young - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (11):2931-2950.
    Through hearing we learn about source events: events in which objects move or interact so that they vibrate and produce sound waves, such as when they roll, collide, or scrape together. It is often claimed that we do not simply hear sounds and infer what event caused them, but hear source events themselves, through hearing sounds. Here I investigate how the idea that we hear source events should be understood, with a focus on how hearing an event (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  16.  70
    Hearing Voices in Different Cultures: A Social Kindling Hypothesis.Tanya M. Luhrmann, R. Padmavati, Hema Tharoor & Akwasi Osei - 2015 - Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (4):646-663.
    This study compares 20 subjects, in each of three different settings, with serious psychotic disorder who hear voices, and compares their voice-hearing experience. We find that while there is much that is similar, there are notable differences in the kinds of voices that people seem to experience. In a California sample, people were more likely to describe their voices as intrusive unreal thoughts; in the South Indian sample, they were more likely to describe them as providing useful guidance; and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  17.  30
    Hearing Beyond the Normal Enabled by Therapeutic Devices: The Role of the Recipient and the Hearing Profession.Gregor Wolbring - 2011 - Neuroethics 6 (3):607-616.
    The time is near where ‘therapeutic’ bodily assistive devices, developed to mimic species-typical body structures in order to enable normative body functioning, will allow the wearer to outperform the species-typical body in various functions. Although such devices are developed for people that are seen to exhibit sub species-typical abilities, many ‘therapeutic enhancements’ might also be desired and used by people that exhibit species-typical body abilities. This paper presents the views of members of the World Federation of the Deaf on potential (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  18. What We Hear.Jason Leddington - 2014 - In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Springer Studies in Brain and Mind.
    A longstanding philosophical tradition holds that the primary objects of hearing are sounds rather than sound sources. In this case, we hear sound sources by—or in virtue of—hearing their sounds. This paper argues that, on the contrary, we have good reason to believe that the primary objects of hearing are sound sources, and that the relationship between a sound and its source is much like the relationship between a color and its bearer. Just as we see objects (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  19.  5
    Hearing Voices and Other Matters of the Mind: What Mental Abnormalities Can Teach Us About Religions.Robert N. McCauley & George Graham - 2020 - Oup Usa.
    Hearing Voices and Other Unusual Experiences examines the long-recognized and striking similarities between features of mental disorders and features of religions. Robert McCauley and George Graham emphasize underlying cognitive continuities between familiar features of religiosity, of mental disorders, and of everyday thinking and action. They contend that much religious thought and behavior can be explained in terms of the cultural activation of humans' natural cognitive systems, which address matters that are essential to human survival: hazard precautions, agency detection, language (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  60
    Hearing, Philosophical Perspectives.Casey O'Callaghan - 2013 - In H. Pashler (ed.), Encyclopedia of the Mind. SAGE. pp. 388-390.
    Hearing and auditory perception are rapidly developing topics in the philosophy of perception. Recent work has focused on characterizing what we hear and on similarities and differences between audition and other modalities. Future work should address how theorizing about audition impacts theorizing about perception more generally. This entry concerns questions about the objects and contents of hearing. It includes discussion of the spatial content of audition, of the role of time and pitch in the individuation of auditory objects, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. The Hearing Impaired Child.Mr Dan Goldstein & Dan Goldstein - 1989 - Routledge.
    _The Hearing Impaired Child_ introduces the background issues of hearing impairment then discusses specific aspects. These include causes of hearing loss, speech and language, personality and emotional development, and careers. Appendices provide checklists for language acquisition and reading and writing skills, lists of useful addresses, a helpful glossary and references for further reading.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. On hearing shapes, surfaces and interiors.Don Ihde - 1982 - In Phenomenology Dialogues & Bridges. SUNY Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Hearing Waves: A Philosophy of Sound and Auditory Perception.Calvin K. W. Kwok - 2020 - Dissertation, The University of Hong Kong
    This dissertation aims to revive wave theory in the philosophy of sound. Wave theory identifies sounds with compression waves. Despite its wide acceptance in the scientific community as the default position, many philosophers have rejected wave theory and opted for different versions of distal theory instead. According to this current majority view, a sound has its stationary location at its source. I argue against this and other alternative philosophical theories of sound and develop wave theory into a more defensible form. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  7
    Hearing and Doing: Philosophical Essays Dedicated to H. Evan Runner.H. Evan Runner - 1979 - Wedge Pub Foundation.
    This book is the result of an idea launched by the present editors of providing a gift to Dr. Runner in the form of a Festschrift written by former students. The response was overwhelming. Glenn Andreas, one of Dr. Runner's closest friends, and Paul Schrotenboer, secretary of the Reformed Ecumenical Synod, enthusiastically joined us, together with Bernard Zylstra of the Institute for Christian Studies and Harry Van Dyke of the Free University of Amsterdam, to form a committee for this purpose... (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Hearing children's voices.William G. Bartholome - 1995 - Bioethics Forum 11 (4):3-6.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  9
    Hearing new music: Pedagogy from a phenomenological perspective.Judy Lochhead - forthcoming - Philosophy of Music Education Review.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27. Hearing sounds.Roger Scruton - 2010 - Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 5:271-278.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  28. Against hearing meanings.Casey O'Callaghan - 2011 - Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):783-807.
    Listening to speech in a language you know differs phenomenologically from listening to speech in an unfamiliar language, a fact often exploited in debates about the phenomenology of thought and cognition. It is plausible that the difference is partly perceptual. Some contend that hearing familiar language involves auditory perceptual awareness of meanings or semantic properties of spoken utterances; but if this were so, there must be something distinctive it is like auditorily to perceptually experience specific meanings of spoken utterances. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  29. Hearing Things: Voice and Method in the Writing of Stanley Cavell.Timothy Gould - 1998 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (2):217-219.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  30. Karl Popper: Philosophy and Problems.A. O' Hear (ed.) - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
  31. Hearing and seeing at Sinai : interpretive trajectories.Steven D. Fraade - 2008 - In George J. Brooke, Hindy Najman & Loren T. Stuckenbruck (eds.), The Significance of Sinai: Traditions About Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity. Brill.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. On hearing the music in the sound: Scruton on musical expression.Paul A. Boghossian - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (1):49–55.
    The fact that we can hear a particular passage of music as expressing a “tranquil gratitude” is a central aspect of the phenomenology of musical experience; without it we would be hard pressed to explain how purely instrumental music could move us in the way that it does. The trouble, here as so often elsewhere in philosophy, is that what seems necessary also seems impossible: for how could a mere series of nonlinguistic sounds, however lovely, express a state of mind? (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  33.  4
    Hearing Parents’ Voices: Parental Refusal of Cochlear Implants and the Zone of Parental Discretion.Owen M. Bradfield - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):143-150.
    It has been forty years since the first multi-channel cochlear implant was used in Australia. While heralded in the hearing world as one of the greatest inventions in modern medicine, not everyone reflects on this achievement with enthusiasm. For many people in the Deaf community, they see the cochlear implant as a tool that reinforces a social construct that pathologizes deafness and removes Deaf identity. In this paper, I set out the main arguments for and against cochlear implantation. While (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. I Hear You Feel Confident.Adam Michael Bricker - 2022 - Philosophical Quarterly 73 (1):24-43.
    Here I explore a new line of evidence for belief–credence dualism, the thesis that beliefs and credences are distinct and equally fundamental types of mental states. Despite considerable recent disagreement over this thesis, little attention has been paid in philosophy to differences in how our mindreading systems represent the beliefs and credences of others. Fascinatingly, the systems we rely on to accurately and efficiently track others’ mental states appear to function like belief–credence dualists: Credence is tracked like an emotional state, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. Lord, Hear Our Prayer: Praying the General Intercessions [Book Review].Marie Farrell - 2009 - The Australasian Catholic Record 86 (1):124.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  78
    Hearing the child.David Archard & Marit Skivenes - 2009 - .
    Given that in our view the child has a fundamental right to be heard in all collective deliberative processes determining his or her future, we set out, firstly, what is required of such processes to respect this right – namely that the child's authentic voice is heard and makes a difference – and, secondly, the distance between this ideal and practice exemplified in the work of child welfare and child protection workers in Norway and the UK, chiefly in their display (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. The phenomenology of voice-hearing and two concepts of voice.Sam Wilkinson & Joel Krueger - 2022 - In Angela Woods, B. Alderson-Day & C. Fernyhough (eds.), Voices in Psychosis: Interdisciplinary Perspective. Oxford University Press. pp. 127-133.
    The experiences described in the VIP transcripts are incredibly varied and yet frequently explicitly labelled by participants as "voices." How can we make sense of this? If we reflect carefully on uses of the word "voice", we see that it can express at least two entirely different concepts, which pick out categorically different phenomena. One concept picks out a speech sound (e.g. "This synthesizer has a "voice" setting"). Another concept picks out a specific agent (e.g. "I hear two voices: one (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Hearing and seeing musical expression.with Vincent Bergeron - 2018 - In Dominic Lopes (ed.), Aesthetics on the Edge: Where Philosophy Meets the Human Sciences. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  10
    Telling, Hearing, and Believing: A Critical Analysis of Narrative Bioethics.K. M. Saulnier - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (2):297-308.
    Narrative ethics taps into an inherent human need to tell our own stories centred on our own moral values and to have those stories heard and acknowledged. However, not everyone’s words are afforded equal power. The use of narrative ethics in bioethical decision-making is problematized by a disparity in whose stories are told, whose stories are heard, and whose stories are believed. Here, I conduct an analysis of narrative ethics through a critical theory lens to show how entrenched patterns of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  40. Hearing a Voice as one’s own: Two Views of Inner Speech Self-Monitoring Deficits in Schizophrenia.Peter Langland-Hassan - 2016 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (3):675-699.
    Many philosophers and psychologists have sought to explain experiences of auditory verbal hallucinations and “inserted thoughts” in schizophrenia in terms of a failure on the part of patients to appropriately monitor their own inner speech. These self-monitoring accounts have recently been challenged by some who argue that AVHs are better explained in terms of the spontaneous activation of auditory-verbal representations. This paper defends two kinds of self-monitoring approach against the spontaneous activation account. The defense requires first making some important clarifications (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  41.  5
    Hear My Voice: Tales of Trauma and Equity From Today's Youth.Heather Dean & Amber E. Wagnon (eds.) - 2019 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This book is designed to make the various hardships encountered by many students more personal in order to give teachers insight into the very real needs of today’s students.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. I Hear a Voice Calling: A Bluegrass Memoir.Gene Lowinger - 2009 - University of Illinois Press.
    A sensitive remembrance of bluegrass dreams and lessons.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Hearing voices: a dialogical reading of Wittgenstein's Philosophical investigations.David Rudrum - 2006 - In Literature and Philosophy: A Guide to Contemporary Debates. Palgrave-Macmillan.
  44.  22
    Hearing Soundless Voices.Sam Wilkinson - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (3):27-34.
    The phenomenon of 'hearing voices,' often viewed as a symptom of schizophrenia, is commonly called, in the scientific and clinical literature, 'auditory-verbal hallucination.' However, reports of hearing soundless voices, voices that are not auditory, which go as far back as Tuttle and Kraepelin and appear in phenomenological interviews and questionnaires are relatively common. What are we to make of such reports?One option is to dismiss these claims: one cannot hear soundless voices. This dismissal could be due to a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. Hearing yourself think: Natural language, inner speech, and thought.David J. Cole - manuscript
    "Mantras were not viewed as the only means of expressing truth, however. Thought, which was defined as internalized speech, offered yet another aspect of truth. And if words and thoughts designated different aspects of truth, or reality, then there had to be an underlying unity behind all phenomena" (S. A. Nigosian 1994: World Faiths, p. 84).
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46. Against hearing phonemes - A note on O’Callaghan.Naomi Osorio-Kupferblum - forthcoming - In Christoph Limbeck-Lilienau & Friedrich Stadler (eds.), Beiträge der Österreichischen Ludwig Wittgenstein Gesellschaft.
    Casey O’Callaghan has argued that rather than hearing meanings, we hear phonemes. In this note I argue that valuable though they are in an account of speech perception – depending on how we define ‘hearing’ – phonemes either don’t explain enough or they go too far. So, they are not the right tool for his criticism of the semantic perceptual account (SPA).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Office o|=.Hearings Unit & Shirley A. Reardon - 2010 - Ethos: Social Education Victoria 18 (4):3.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Hearing and Seeing Musical Expression.Vincent Bergeron & Dominic Mciver Lopes - 2009 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (1):1-16.
    Everybody assumes (1) that musical performances are sonic events and (2) that their expressive properties are sonic properties. This paper discusses recent findings in the psychology of music perception that show that visual information combines with auditory information in the perception of musical expression. The findings show at the very least that arguments are needed for (1) and (2). If music expresses what we think it does, then its expressive properties may be visual as well as sonic; and if its (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  49.  1
    Experience, Explanation, and Faith: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion.Anthony O'Hear - 1984 - Routledge and Kegan Paul.
    In this book Anthony O’Hear examines the reasons that are given for religious faith. His approach is firmly within the classical tradition of natural theology, but an underlying theme is the differences between the personal Creator of the Bible or the Koran and a God conceived of as the indeterminate ground of everything determinate. Drawing on several religious traditions and on the resources of contemporary philosophy, specific chapters analyse the nature of religious faith and of religious experience. They examine connections (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  50.  13
    Deaf hearing: Implicit discrimination of auditory content in a patient with mixed hearing loss.Berit Brogaard, Kristian Marlow, Morten Overgaard, Bennett L. Schwartz, Cengiz Zopluoglu, Steffie Tomson, Janina Neufed, Christopher Sinke, Christopher Owen & David Eagleman - 2017 - Philosophical Psychology 30 (1-2):21-43.
    We describe a patient LS, profoundly deaf in both ears from birth, with underdeveloped superior temporal gyri. Without hearing aids, LS displays no ability to detect sounds below a fixed threshold of 60 dBs, which classifies him as clinically deaf. Under these no-hearing-aid conditions, when presented with a forced-choice paradigm in which he is asked to consciously respond, he is unable to make above-chance judgments about the presence or location of sounds. However, he is able to make above-chance (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000