Results for 'Hearing'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
Bibliography: Hearing in Philosophy of Mind
  1.  57
    Art and Technology: An Old Tension: Anthony O'Hear.Anthony O'Hear - 1995 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 38:143-158.
    This is not the first time the title ‘Art and Technology’ has been used, but to distinguish what I have to say from Walter Gropius's Bauhaus exhibition of 1923, I am subtitling my paper ‘an old tension’, where the architect spoke of ‘a new unity’. In a way, Gropius has been proved right; the structures of the future avoiding all romantic embellishment and whimsy, the cathedrals of socialism, the corporate planning of comprehensive Utopian designs have all gone up and some (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  67
    Hearing Spaces.Nick Young - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (2):242-255.
    In this paper I argue that empty space can be heard. This position contrasts with the generally held view that the only things that can be heard are sounds, their properties, echoes, and perhaps sound sources. Specifically, I suggest that when sounds reverberate in enclosed environments we auditorily represent the volume of space surrounding us. Clearly, we can learn the approximate size of an enclosed space through hearing a sound reverberate within it, and so any account that denies that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  3.  73
    Hearing Objects and Events.Nick Young - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (11):2931-2950.
    Through hearing we learn about source events: events in which objects move or interact so that they vibrate and produce sound waves, such as when they roll, collide, or scrape together. It is often claimed that we do not simply hear sounds and infer what event caused them, but hear source events themselves, through hearing sounds. Here I investigate how the idea that we hear source events should be understood, with a focus on how hearing an event (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4.  5
    Imprisonment: Anthony O'Hear.Anthony O'hear - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 18:203-220.
    It is appropriate that a lecture in a series on ‘Philosophy and Practice’ should open by considering Bentham's ideas on imprisonment. For Bentham, incontestably a philosopher, was equally incontestably a practical reformer. This, indeed, is a received idea among philosophers; that is to say, most philosophers know that Bentham designed ‘a model prison of novel design’, but few have actually considered the design, its implications or its effects. Most are content, like Warnock, with observing that the panopticon plan was formally (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  69
    Hearing Voices in Different Cultures: A Social Kindling Hypothesis.Tanya M. Luhrmann, R. Padmavati, Hema Tharoor & Akwasi Osei - 2015 - Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (4):646-663.
    This study compares 20 subjects, in each of three different settings, with serious psychotic disorder who hear voices, and compares their voice-hearing experience. We find that while there is much that is similar, there are notable differences in the kinds of voices that people seem to experience. In a California sample, people were more likely to describe their voices as intrusive unreal thoughts; in the South Indian sample, they were more likely to describe them as providing useful guidance; and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  6. 15 Hearing and Hallucinating Silence.Ian Phillips - 2013 - In Fiona Macpherson & Dimitris Platchias (eds.), Hallucination. MIT Press. pp. 333.
    Tradition has it that, although we experience darkness, we can neither hear nor hallucinate silence. At most, we hear that it is silent, in virtue of lacking auditory experience. This cognitive view is at odds with our ordinary thought and talk. Yet it is not easy to vouchsafe the perception of silence: Sorensen‘s recent account entails the implausible claim that the permanently and profoundly deaf are perpetually hallucinating silence. To better defend the view that we can genuinely hear and hallucinate (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  7.  97
    Hearing the Difference: Theorizing Connection.Carol Gilligan - 1995 - Hypatia 10 (2):120 - 127.
    Hearing the difference between a patriarchal voice and a relational voice defines a paradigm shift: a change in the conception of the human world. Theorizing connection as primary and fundamental in human life leads to a new psychology, which shifts the grounds for philosophy and political theory. A crucial distinction is made between a feminine ethic of care and a feminist ethic of care. Voice, relationship, resistance, and women become central rather than peripheral in this reframing of the human (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  8.  29
    Hearing Beyond the Normal Enabled by Therapeutic Devices: The Role of the Recipient and the Hearing Profession.Gregor Wolbring - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (3):607-616.
    The time is near where ‘therapeutic’ bodily assistive devices, developed to mimic species-typical body structures in order to enable normative body functioning, will allow the wearer to outperform the species-typical body in various functions. Although such devices are developed for people that are seen to exhibit sub species-typical abilities, many ‘therapeutic enhancements’ might also be desired and used by people that exhibit species-typical body abilities. This paper presents the views of members of the World Federation of the Deaf on potential (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  9. Hearing Colors, Tasting Shapes.Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Edward M. Hubbard - 2003 - Scientific American (May):52-59.
    Jones and Coleman are among a handful of otherwise normal as a child and the number 5 was red and 6 was green. This the- people who have synesthesia. They experience the ordinary ory does not answer why only some people retain such vivid world in extraordinary ways and seem to inhabit a mysterious sensory memories, however. You might _think _of cold when you no-man’s-land between fantasy and reality. For them the sens- look at a picture of an ice cube, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  10. Against Hearing Meanings.Casey O'Callaghan - 2011 - Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):783-807.
    Listening to speech in a language you know differs phenomenologically from listening to speech in an unfamiliar language, a fact often exploited in debates about the phenomenology of thought and cognition. It is plausible that the difference is partly perceptual. Some contend that hearing familiar language involves auditory perceptual awareness of meanings or semantic properties of spoken utterances; but if this were so, there must be something distinctive it is like auditorily to perceptually experience specific meanings of spoken utterances. (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  11. In Defense of Hearing Meanings.Berit Brogaard - 2018 - Synthese 195 (7):2967-2983.
    According to the inferential view of language comprehension, we hear a speaker’s utterance and infer what was said, drawing on our competence in the syntax and semantics of the language together with background information. On the alternative perceptual view, fluent speakers have a non-inferential capacity to perceive the content of speech. On this view, when we hear a speaker’s utterance, the experience confers some degree of justification on our beliefs about what was said in the absence of defeaters. So, in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  12.  14
    Hearing Things: Voice and Method in the Writing of Stanley Cavell.Timothy Gould - 1998 - University of Chicago Press.
    Hearing Things is the first work to treat systematically the relation between Cavell's pervasive authorial voice and his equally powerful, though less discernible, impulse to produce a set of usable philosophical methods.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  13. What We Hear.Jason Leddington - 2014 - In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Springer Studies in Brain and Mind.
    A longstanding philosophical tradition holds that the primary objects of hearing are sounds rather than sound sources. In this case, we hear sound sources by—or in virtue of—hearing their sounds. This paper argues that, on the contrary, we have good reason to believe that the primary objects of hearing are sound sources, and that the relationship between a sound and its source is much like the relationship between a color and its bearer. Just as we see objects (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  14. Hearing a Voice as One’s Own: Two Views of Inner Speech Self-Monitoring Deficits in Schizophrenia.Peter Langland-Hassan - 2016 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (3):675-699.
    Many philosophers and psychologists have sought to explain experiences of auditory verbal hallucinations and “inserted thoughts” in schizophrenia in terms of a failure on the part of patients to appropriately monitor their own inner speech. These self-monitoring accounts have recently been challenged by some who argue that AVHs are better explained in terms of the spontaneous activation of auditory-verbal representations. This paper defends two kinds of self-monitoring approach against the spontaneous activation account. The defense requires first making some important clarifications (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  15. Hearing Meanings: The Revenge of Context.Luca Gasparri & Michael Murez - 2019 - Synthese 198 (6):5229-5252.
    According to the perceptual view of language comprehension, listeners typically recover high-level linguistic properties such as utterance meaning without inferential work. The perceptual view is subject to the Objection from Context: since utterance meaning is massively context-sensitive, and context-sensitivity requires cognitive inference, the perceptual view is false. In recent work, Berit Brogaard provides a challenging reply to this objection. She argues that in language comprehension context-sensitivity is typically exercised not through inferences, but rather through top-down perceptual modulations or perceptual learning. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  29
    Hearing What the Body Feels: Auditory Encoding of Rhythmic Movement.Jessica Phillips-Silver & Laurel J. Trainor - 2007 - Cognition 105 (3):533-546.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  17. Experience, Explanation, and Faith an Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion /Anthony O'hear. --. --.Anthony O'hear - 1984 - Routledge & K. Paul, 1984.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  3
    The Real or the Real? Chardin or Rothko?1: Anthony O'Hear.Anthony O'Hear - 1992 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 32:47-58.
    I will begin by considering some themes from Proust's wonderful essay on Chardin, Chardin and Rembrandt . Proust speaks of the young man ‘of modest means and artistic taste’, his imagination filled with the splendour of museums, of cathedrals, of mountains, of the sea, sitting at table at the end of lunch, nauseated at the ‘traditional mundanity’ of the unaesthetic spectacle before him: the last knife left lying on the half turned-back table cloth, next to the remains of an underdone (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Hearing and Seeing Musical Expression.Vincent Bergeron & Dominic Mciver Lopes - 2009 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (1):1-16.
    Everybody assumes (1) that musical performances are sonic events and (2) that their expressive properties are sonic properties. This paper discusses recent findings in the psychology of music perception that show that visual information combines with auditory information in the perception of musical expression. The findings show at the very least that arguments are needed for (1) and (2). If music expresses what we think it does, then its expressive properties may be visual as well as sonic; and if its (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  20.  44
    When Hearing the Bark Helps to Identify the Dog: Semantically-Congruent Sounds Modulate the Identification of Masked Pictures.Yi-Chuan Chen & Charles Spence - 2010 - Cognition 114 (3):389-404.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  21.  18
    Hearing Words Changes Color Perception: Facilitation of Color Discrimination by Verbal and Visual Cues.Lewis Forder & Gary Lupyan - 2019 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 148 (7):1105-1123.
  22.  13
    Deaf Hearing: Implicit Discrimination of Auditory Content in a Patient with Mixed Hearing Loss.Berit Brogaard, Kristian Marlow, Morten Overgaard, Bennett L. Schwartz, Cengiz Zopluoglu, Steffie Tomson, Janina Neufed, Christopher Sinke, Christopher Owen & David Eagleman - 2017 - Philosophical Psychology 30 (1-2):21-43.
    We describe a patient LS, profoundly deaf in both ears from birth, with underdeveloped superior temporal gyri. Without hearing aids, LS displays no ability to detect sounds below a fixed threshold of 60 dBs, which classifies him as clinically deaf. Under these no-hearing-aid conditions, when presented with a forced-choice paradigm in which he is asked to consciously respond, he is unable to make above-chance judgments about the presence or location of sounds. However, he is able to make above-chance (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23.  11
    Hear Me Write: Does CEO Narcissism Affect Disclosure?Gilberto Marquez-Illescas, Allan A. Zebedee & Linying Zhou - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (2):401-417.
    Through earnings announcements, conference calls, and other press releases, corporate executives have an opportunity to frame the narrative of financial disclosures. Numerous studies have shown that textual tone significantly influences stock returns, suggesting that through word choice, upper management may impact market reaction. In this study, we examine the influence of CEO personality traits on corporate disclosures by analyzing the tone of earnings announcements for a sample of Fortune 500 CEOs over nearly two decades. Our hypotheses are twofold: that qualitative (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24. Hearing Silence: The Perception and Introspection of Absences.Roy Sorenson - 2009 - In Matthew Nudds & Casey O'Callaghan (eds.), Sounds and Perception. Oxford University Press.
    in Sounds and Perception: New Philosophical Essays, ed. by Matthew Nudds and Casey O’Callaghan (Oxford University Press, forthcoming in 2008).
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  25.  8
    Telling, Hearing, and Believing: A Critical Analysis of Narrative Bioethics.K. M. Saulnier - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (2):297-308.
    Narrative ethics taps into an inherent human need to tell our own stories centred on our own moral values and to have those stories heard and acknowledged. However, not everyone’s words are afforded equal power. The use of narrative ethics in bioethical decision-making is problematized by a disparity in whose stories are told, whose stories are heard, and whose stories are believed. Here, I conduct an analysis of narrative ethics through a critical theory lens to show how entrenched patterns of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26. XIII—Hearing Properties, Effects or Parts?Casey O'callaghan - 2011 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (3pt3):375-405.
    Sounds are audible, and sound sources are audible. What is the audible relation between audible sounds and audible sources? Common talk and philosophy suggest three candidates. The first is that sounds audibly are properties instantiated by their sources. I argue that sounds are audible individuals and thus are not audibly instantiated by audible sources. The second is that sounds audibly are effects of their sources. I argue that auditory experience presents no compelling evidence that sounds audibly are causally related to (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  27.  8
    I Hear You : Sharers’ Expressions and Listeners’ Inferences of the Need for Support in Response to Negative Emotions.Lisanne S. Pauw, Disa A. Sauter, Gerben A. van Kleef & Agneta H. Fischer - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (6):1129-1143.
    ABSTRACTWhen in emotional distress, people often turn to others for support. Paradoxically, even when people perceive social support to be beneficial, it often does not result in emotional recovery...
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28.  12
    Hearing Loss Impacts Neural Alpha Oscillations Under Adverse Listening Conditions.Eline B. Petersen, Malte Wã¶Stmann, Jonas Obleser, Stefan Stenfelt & Thomas Lunner - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  29. Seeing Causings and Hearing Gestures.Stephen Andrew Butterfill - 2009 - Philosophical Quarterly 59 (236):405-428.
    Can humans see causal interactions? Evidence on the visual perception of causal interactions, from Michotte to contemporary work, is best interpreted as showing that we can see some causal interactions in the same sense as that in which we can hear speech. Causal perception, like speech perception, is a form of categorical perception.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  30.  18
    The Plato Cult and Other Philosophical Follies.Anthony O'Hear - 1993 - Philosophical Quarterly 43 (171):264-266.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  31. On Hearing the Music in the Sound: Scruton on Musical Expression.Paul A. Boghossian - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (1):49–55.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  32.  14
    Karl Popper: Philosophy and Problems.Anthony O'Hear (ed.) - 1980 - Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  33. Beyond Evolution: Human Nature and the Limits of Evolutionary Explanation.Anthony O'Hear - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    In this controversial new book O'Hear takes a stand against the fashion for explaining human behavior in terms of evolution. He contends that while the theory of evolution is successful in explaining the development of the natural world in general, it is of limited value when applied to the human world. Because of our reflectiveness and our rationality we take on goals and ideals which cannot be justified in terms of survival-promotion or reproductive advantage. O'Hear examines the nature of human (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  34. The Epistemic Challenge of Hearing Child’s Voice.Karin Murris - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):245-259.
    Classical conceptual distinctions in philosophy of education assume an individualistic subjectivity and hide the learning that can take place in the space between child (as educator) and adult (as learner). Grounded in two examples from experience I develop the argument that adults often put metaphorical sticks in their ears in their educational encounters with children. Hearers’ prejudices cause them to miss out on knowledge offered by the child, but not heard by the adult. This has to do with how adults (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  35.  62
    Seeing and Hearing Meanings. A Non-Inferential Approach to Utterance Comprehension.Berit Brogaard - 2020 - In Anders Nes & Timothy Chan (eds.), Inference and Consciousness. Routledge. pp. 99-124.
    In this paper I provide empirical and theoretical considerations in favor of a non-inferential view of speech comprehension. On the view defended, we typically comprehend speech by perceiving or grasping apparently conveyed meanings directly rather than by inferring them from, say, linguistic principles and perceived phonemes. “Speech” is here used in the broad sense to refer not only to verbal expression, but also written messages, including Braille, and conventional signs and symbols, like emojis, a stop sign or a swastika. Along (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  14
    Hearing the Opposition: It Starts at the Top.Robert Y. Shapiro - 2013 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 25 (2):226-244.
    ABSTRACT In Hearing the Other Side, Diana Mutz poses a conundrum: The more one is exposed to political disagreement, the more likely one is to withdraw from political engagement. This behavior may result in part from the political polarization of recent decades, but it may also be due to the traditional media, which tend to magnify political competition and portray it as a bitter conflict. The rise of the Internet and social media offered hope that people might more readily (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  22
    Descartes.Anthony O'Hear - 1979 - Philosophical Quarterly 29 (116):263-264.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  38.  22
    Hearing a Melody in Different Ways: Multistability of Metrical Interpretation, Reflected in Rate Limits of Sensorimotor Synchronization.Bruno H. Repp - 2007 - Cognition 102 (3):434-454.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39.  8
    Hearing New Music: Pedagogy From a Phenomenological Perspective.Judy Lochhead - forthcoming - Philosophy of Music Education Review.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  2
    Hearing What Cannot Be Said.Ben A. Bock & Dick L. Willems - 2020 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 26 (2):419-424.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  55
    Seeing to Hear Better: Evidence for Early Audio-Visual Interactions in Speech Identification.Jean-Luc Schwartz, Frédéric Berthommier & Christophe Savariaux - 2004 - Cognition 93 (2):69-78.
    Lip reading is the ability to partially understand speech by looking at the speaker's lips. It improves the intelligibility of speech in noise when audio-visual perception is compared with audio-only perception. A recent set of experiments showed that seeing the speaker's lips also enhances sensitivity to acoustic information, decreasing the auditory detection threshold of speech embedded in noise [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109 (2001) 2272; J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108 (2000) 1197]. However, detection is different from comprehension, and it remains (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  42.  2
    Embodying Affect: Voice-Hearing, Telepathy, Suggestion and Modelling the Non-Conscious.Lisa Blackman - 2010 - Body and Society 16 (1):163-192.
    This article takes a genealogical approach to the problem of affective communication that we find coalescing around the phenomenon of ‘affective transfer’ identified in experiences such as voice-hearing, telepathy and hypnotic suggestion. These experiences breach the boundaries between the self and other, inside and outside, and material and immaterial, and make visible some of the central issues that are important in re-thinking affect, relationality and embodiment. The article will attempt to re-engage the problematic of subjectivity by asking what a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  43.  84
    Hearing a Still-Ticking Bomb Argument: A Reply to Bufacchi and Arrigo.J. Jeremy Wisnewski - 2009 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):205-209.
    My aim in this paper is to demonstrate that the recent anti-Ticking Bomb argument offered by Bufacchi and Arrigo is unsuccessful. To adequately refute the Ticking Bomb strategy, I claim, requires carefully addressing both policy questions and questions involving exceptional conduct.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44.  4
    Other Human Beings.Anthony O'Hear - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (165):502-505.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  45. On Hearing Women's Voices: A Reply to Susan Okin.Martha C. Nussbaum - 2004 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 32 (2):193-205.
  46. An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science.A. O'hear - 1993 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (4):743-758.
    This book is a balanced and up-to-date introduction to the philosophy of science. It covers all the main topics in the area, as well as introducing the student to the moral and social reality of science. The author's style is free from jargon, and although he makes use of scientific examples, these should be intelligible to those without much scientific background. At the same time the questions he raises are not merely abstract, so the book will be of interest and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  47.  9
    Quasi-Hearing in Husserl, Levinson, and Gordon.Norman Sieroka - 2005 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 36 (1):4-22.
  48. Hearing Children's Voices.William G. Bartholome - 1995 - Bioethics Forum 11 (4):3-6.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49.  15
    Belief and the Will.Anthony O'Hear - 1972 - Philosophy 47 (180):95 - 112.
    In this article, we will consider how far we might be said to be active in forming our beliefs; in particular, we will ask to what extent we can be said to be free in believing what we want to believe. It is clear that we ought to believe only what is really so, at least in so far as it lies in our power to determine this, but reflection shows that, regrettably, we do not confine our beliefs to what (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  50. Hearing It Rain - Millikan on Language Learning.Naomi Osorio-Kupferblum - 2013 - Beiträge der Österreichischen Ludwig Wittgenstein Gesellschaft 21.
    In her ‘Spracherwerb’(2012) Ruth Millikan gives a compelling account of language acquisition based on our ability to track objects. I argue that, and how, it is undermined by her insistence on equating understanding language utterances and sense perception, point to idealist hazards, and plead against propositionality and for imagism in order to safeguard the account’s important potential for giving a comprehensive explication of meaning.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000