Search results for 'Hearing' (try it on Scholar)

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Bibliography: Hearing in Philosophy of Mind
  1.  20
    Margaret A. Defeyter, Jill Hearing & Tamsin C. German (2009). A Developmental Dissociation Between Category and Function Judgments About Novel Artifacts. Cognition 110 (2):260-264.
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  2.  18
    Gregor Wolbring (2013). Hearing Beyond the Normal Enabled by Therapeutic Devices: The Role of the Recipient and the Hearing Profession. Neuroethics 6 (3):607-616.
    The time is near where ‘therapeutic’ bodily assistive devices, developed to mimic species-typical body structures in order to enable normative body functioning, will allow the wearer to outperform the species-typical body in various functions. Although such devices are developed for people that are seen to exhibit sub species-typical abilities, many ‘therapeutic enhancements’ might also be desired and used by people that exhibit species-typical body abilities. This paper presents the views of members of the World Federation of the Deaf on potential (...)
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  3.  55
    Jussi Backman (2015). Towards a Genealogy of the Metaphysics of Sight: Seeing, Hearing, and Thinking in Heraclitus and Parmenides. In Antonio Cimino & Pavlos Kontos (eds.), Phenomenology and the Metaphysics of Sight. Brill 11-34.
    The paper outlines a tentative genealogy of the Platonic metaphysics of sight by thematizing pre-Platonic thought, particularly Heraclitus and Parmenides. By “metaphysics of sight” it understands the features of Platonic-Aristotelian metaphysics expressed with the help of visual metaphors. It is argued that the Platonic metaphysics of sight can be regarded as the result of a synthesis of the Heraclitean and Parmenidean approaches. In pre-Platonic thought, the visual paradigm is still marginal. For Heraclitus, the basic structure of being is its discursive (...)
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  4.  18
    Nick Young (forthcoming). Hearing Spaces. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    In this paper I argue that empty space can be heard. This position contrasts with the generally held view that the only things that can be heard are sounds, their properties, echoes, and perhaps sound sources. Specifically, I suggest that when sounds reverberate in enclosed environments we auditorily represent the volume of space surrounding us. Clearly, we can learn the approximate size of an enclosed space through hearing a sound reverberate within it, and so any account that denies that (...)
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  5.  95
    Alessandro Arbo (2009). Some Remarks on “Hearing-as” and its Role in the Aesthetics of Music. Topoi 28 (2):97-107.
    Starting from the context in which Wittgenstein thinks of the concepts of “seeing-as” and “hearing-as”, the basic relation is clarified between the question of representation, musical understanding, and the theory of musical expressiveness. The points of views of Wollheim, Scruton, Levinson, and Ridley are discussed, in a re-consideration of the notions of hearing and understanding within Wittgenstein’s “last philosophy”.
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  6.  27
    Casey O'Callaghan (2013). Hearing, Philosophical Perspectives. In H. Pashler (ed.), Encyclopedia of the Mind. SAGE 388-390.
    Hearing and auditory perception are rapidly developing topics in the philosophy of perception. Recent work has focused on characterizing what we hear and on similarities and differences between audition and other modalities. Future work should address how theorizing about audition impacts theorizing about perception more generally. This entry concerns questions about the objects and contents of hearing. It includes discussion of the spatial content of audition, of the role of time and pitch in the individuation of auditory objects, (...)
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  7.  12
    Anette Lykke Hindhede (2015). Situations of Choice: Configuring the Empowered Consumer of Hearing Technologies. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 23 (3):221-237.
    Focusing on the largest and, arguably, the least visible disability group, the hearing impaired, this paper explores present-day views and understandings of hearing impairment and rehabilitation in a Danish context, with particular focus on working-age adults with late onset of hearing impairment. The paper shows how recent changes in perception of the hearing impaired patient relate to the introduction of a new health care reform that turns audiological rehabilitation into a consumer issue. Ethnographic and interview data (...)
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  8.  16
    Mirko Bagaric (2010). The Right to an Impartial Hearing Trumps the Social Imperative of Bringing Accused to Trial Even 'Down Under'. Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (3):321-339.
    Accused persons who are subjected to a saturation level of negative media coverage may be denied an impartial hearing, which is perhaps the most important aspect of the right to a fair hearing. Despite this, the courts have generally held that the social imperative of prosecuting accused trumps the interests of the accused. The justification for an impartial hearing stems from the repugnance of convicting the innocent. Viewed dispassionately, this imperative is not absolute, given that every legal (...)
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  9.  8
    Janice Morse (2011). Hearing Bad News. Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (3):187-211.
    Personal reports of receiving bad news provide data that describes patients’ comprehension, reflections, experienced emotions, and an interpretative commentary with the wisdom of hindsight. Analysis of autobiographical accounts of “hearing bad news” enables the identification of patterns of how patients found out diagnoses, buffering techniques used, and styles of receiving the news. I describe how patients grapple with the news, their somatic responses to hearing, and how they struggle and strive to accept what they are hearing. I (...)
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  10.  27
    Mohan Matthen (2016). Effort and Displeasure in People Who Are Hard of Hearing. Ear and Hearing 37:28S-34S.
    Listening effort helps explain why people who are hard of hearing are prone to fatigue and social withdrawal. However, a one-factor model that cites only effort due to hardness of hearing is insufficient as there are many who lead happy lives despite their disability. This paper explores other contributory factors, in particular motivational arousal and pleasure. The theory of rational motivational arousal predicts that some people forego listening comprehension because they believe it to be impossible and hence worth (...)
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  11.  78
    Moreland Perkins (1966). Seeing and Hearing Emotions. Analysis 26 (June):193-197.
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  12.  10
    Rudolf Pintner & Donald G. Paterson (1917). A Comparison of Deaf and Hearing Children in Visual Memory for Digits. Journal of Experimental Psychology 2 (1):76-88.
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  13.  5
    Janneke P. C. Grutters, Lucien J. C. Anteunis, Michelene N. Chenault & Manuela A. Joore (2009). Willingness to Pay for a Hearing Aid: Comparing the Payment Scale and Open‐Ended Question. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (1):91-96.
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  14.  6
    M. Lawrence (1941). Vitamin A Deficiency and its Relation to Hearing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (1):37.
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  15.  3
    David S. Emmerich, Donald M. Goldenbaum, Dale L. Hayden, Linda S. Hoffman & Jeanne L. Treffts (1965). Meaningfulness as a Variable in Dichotic Hearing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (4):433.
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  16.  4
    R. Gundlach (1929). Tonal Attributes and Frequency Theories of Hearing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 12 (3):187.
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  17.  4
    Jan A. Duijvestijn, Janneke P. C. Grutters, Michelene N. Chenault, Manuela A. Joore, Johannes J. Manni & Lucien J. C. Anteunis (2011). Shared Care for Hearing Complaints: Guideline Effects on Patient Flow. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (2):209-214.
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  18.  2
    A. H. Holway, R. C. Staton & M. J. Zigler (1940). The Neurophysiology of Hearing: I. The Magnitude of Threshold-Stimuli During Recovery From Stimulation-Deafness. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (6):669.
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  19.  1
    Ting‐Kuang Chao & Tony Hsiu‐Hsi Chen (2009). Predictive Model for Progression of Hearing Loss: Meta‐Analysis of Multi‐State Outcome. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (1):32-40.
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  20.  1
    S. Dworkin, J. Katzman, G. A. Hutchinson & J. R. McCabe (1940). Hearing Acuity of Animals as Measured by Conditioning Methods. Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (3):281.
  21. C. Burnett, M. Fend, P. Gouk & H. F. Cohen (1994). The Second Sense. Studies in Hearing and Musical Judgement From Antiquity to the Seventeenth Century. Annals of Science 51 (4):427-428.
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  22. Don Ihde (1982). On Hearing Shapes, Surfaces and Interiors. In Phenomenology Dialogues & Bridges. Suny
     
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  23.  8
    Lauri Siisiäinen (2012). Foucault and the Politics of Hearing. Routledge.
    This work will be of great interest to students and scholars in a range of areas including political theory, philosophy, and cultural studies.
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  24.  34
    Tanya M. Luhrmann, R. Padmavati, Hema Tharoor & Akwasi Osei (2015). Hearing Voices in Different Cultures: A Social Kindling Hypothesis. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (4):646-663.
    This study compares 20 subjects, in each of three different settings, with serious psychotic disorder who hear voices, and compares their voice-hearing experience. We find that while there is much that is similar, there are notable differences in the kinds of voices that people seem to experience. In a California sample, people were more likely to describe their voices as intrusive unreal thoughts; in the South Indian sample, they were more likely to describe them as providing useful guidance; and (...)
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  25.  35
    Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). In Defense of Hearing Meanings. Synthese:1-17.
    According to the inferential view of language comprehension, we hear a speaker’s utterance and infer what was said, drawing on our competence in the syntax and semantics of the language together with background information. On the alternative perceptual view, fluent speakers have a non-inferential capacity to perceive the content of speech. On this view, when we hear a speaker’s utterance, the experience confers some degree of justification on our beliefs about what was said in the absence of defeaters. So, in (...)
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  26. Casey O'Callaghan (2011). Against Hearing Meanings. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):783-807.
    Listening to speech in a language you know differs phenomenologically from listening to speech in an unfamiliar language, a fact often exploited in debates about the phenomenology of thought and cognition. It is plausible that the difference is partly perceptual. Some contend that hearing familiar language involves auditory perceptual awareness of meanings or semantic properties of spoken utterances; but if this were so, there must be something distinctive it is like auditorily to perceptually experience specific meanings of spoken utterances. (...)
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  27. Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Edward M. Hubbard (2003). Hearing Colors, Tasting Shapes. Scientific American (May):52-59.
    Jones and Coleman are among a handful of otherwise normal as a child and the number 5 was red and 6 was green. This the- people who have synesthesia. They experience the ordinary ory does not answer why only some people retain such vivid world in extraordinary ways and seem to inhabit a mysterious sensory memories, however. You might _think _of cold when you no-man’s-land between fantasy and reality. For them the sens- look at a picture of an ice cube, (...)
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  28.  41
    Carol Gilligan (1995). Hearing the Difference: Theorizing Connection. Hypatia 10 (2):120 - 127.
    Hearing the difference between a patriarchal voice and a relational voice defines a paradigm shift: a change in the conception of the human world. Theorizing connection as primary and fundamental in human life leads to a new psychology, which shifts the grounds for philosophy and political theory. A crucial distinction is made between a feminine ethic of care and a feminist ethic of care. Voice, relationship, resistance, and women become central rather than peripheral in this reframing of the human (...)
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  29.  24
    Chloë R. Marshall & Gary Morgan (2015). From Gesture to Sign Language: Conventionalization of Classifier Constructions by Adult Hearing Learners of British Sign Language. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):61-80.
    There has long been interest in why languages are shaped the way they are, and in the relationship between sign language and gesture. In sign languages, entity classifiers are handshapes that encode how objects move, how they are located relative to one another, and how multiple objects of the same type are distributed in space. Previous studies have shown that hearing adults who are asked to use only manual gestures to describe how objects move in space will use gestures (...)
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  30.  2
    Timothy Gould (1998). Hearing Things: Voice and Method in the Writing of Stanley Cavell. University of Chicago Press.
    Hearing Things is the first work to treat systematically the relation between Cavell's pervasive authorial voice and his equally powerful, though less discernible, impulse to produce a set of usable philosophical methods.
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  31.  5
    Robert Y. Shapiro (2013). Hearing the Opposition: It Starts at the Top. Critical Review 25 (2):226-244.
    ABSTRACT In Hearing the Other Side, Diana Mutz poses a conundrum: The more one is exposed to political disagreement, the more likely one is to withdraw from political engagement. This behavior may result in part from the political polarization of recent decades, but it may also be due to the traditional media, which tend to magnify political competition and portray it as a bitter conflict. The rise of the Internet and social media offered hope that people might more readily (...)
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  32.  22
    M. Hayry (2004). There is a Difference Between Selecting a Deaf Embryo and Deafening a Hearing Child. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (5):510-512.
    If genetic diagnosis and preimplantation selection could be employed to produce deaf children, would it be acceptable for deaf parents to do so? Some say no, because there is no moral difference between selecting a deaf embryo and deafening a hearing child, and because it would be wrong to deafen infants. It is argued in this paper, however, that this view is untenable. There are differences between the two activities, and it is perfectly possible to condone genetic selection for (...)
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  33. Péter Lautner (2005). The Timaeus on Sounds and Hearing with Some Implications for Plato's General Account of Sense-Perception. Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 2:235-253.
    The aim of this paper is twofold. First, it may be clear that ears play a role quite different from that of the other sense-organs. Unlike the eyes, nose and tongue, ears cannot be called genuine sense-organs. They only transmit the blow in the air to the brain and the blood in the head that receive the blow. Second, since hearing is defined as a motion extending from the brain to the region around the liver, there is a possibility (...)
     
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  34.  1
    B. O. Olusanya (2006). Ethical Issues in Screening for Hearing Impairment in Newborns in Developing Countries. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (10):588-591.
    Screening of newborns for permanent congenital or early-onset hearing impairment has emerged as an essential component of neonatal care in developed countries, following favourable outcomes from early intervention in the critical period for optimal speech and language development. Progress towards a similar programme in developing countries, where most of the world’s children with hearing impairment reside, may be impeded by reservations about the available level of support services and the possible effect of the prevailing healthcare challenges. Ethical justification (...)
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  35.  61
    Paul F. Snowdon (2009). Peacocke on Musical Experience and Hearing Metaphorically-As. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (3):277-281.
    Christopher Peacocke's paper presents a characteristically rich and original theory of the so-called expressive qualities of music. It is, surely, impossible to come to a verdict on such an interesting theory quickly, and it will, no doubt, attract continuing and merited attention. The purpose of my preliminary reflections is to raise some questions about the proposal and to express some reservations, but I see these remarks as simply opening and inconclusive ones in a longer dialogue. I am going to divide (...)
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  36.  48
    Hannes Ole Matthiessen (2010). Seeing and Hearing Directly. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (1):91-103.
    According to Paul Snowdon, one directly perceives an object x iff one is in a position to make a true demonstrative judgement of the form “That is x”. Whenever one perceives an object x indirectly (or dependently , as Snowdon puts it) it is the case that there exists an item y (which is not identical to x) such that one can count as demonstrating x only if one acknowledges that y bears a certain relation to x. In this paper (...)
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  37.  28
    Richard Kenneth Atkins (2013). Toward an Objective Phenomenological Vocabulary: How Seeing a Scarlet Red is Like Hearing a Trumpet's Blare. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):837-858.
    Nagel’s challenge is to devise an objective phenomenological vocabulary that can describe the objective structural similarities between aural and visual perception. My contention is that Charles Sanders Peirce’s little studied and less understood phenomenological vocabulary makes a significant contribution to meeting this challenge. I employ Peirce’s phenomenology to identify the structural isomorphism between seeing a scarlet red and hearing a trumpet’s blare. I begin by distinguishing between the vividness of an experience and the intensity of a quality. I proceed (...)
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  38.  31
    C. Mand, R. E. Duncan, L. Gillam, V. Collins & M. B. Delatycki (2009). Genetic Selection for Deafness: The Views of Hearing Children of Deaf Adults. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (12):722-728.
    The concept of selecting for a disability, and deafness in particular, has triggered a controversial and sometimes acrimonious debate between key stakeholders. Previous studies have concentrated on the views of the deaf and hard of hearing, health professionals and ethicists towards reproductive selection for deafness. This study, however, is the first of its kind examining the views of hearing children of deaf adults towards preimplantation genetic diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis to select for or against deafness. Hearing children (...)
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  39.  12
    Frederick Antczak (1994). Hearing Our Cassandras: Ethical Criticism and Rhetorical Receptions of Paul Ehrlich. Social Epistemology 8 (3):281 – 288.
    (1994). Hearing our cassandras: Ethical criticism and rhetorical receptions of Paul Ehrlich. Social Epistemology: Vol. 8, Public Indifference to Population Issues, pp. 281-288.
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  40.  16
    Isabelle Sendowski & Jacques Viret (2004). The Survival Attractor in the Sensory Functions: The Example of Hearing. Acta Biotheoretica 52 (4):401-414.
    High noise levels may have an adverse effect on the normal cochlea function and lead to significant hearing loss. Clinically, exposure to high intensity impulse noise produces a wide range of audiometric effects which may result in long term or even irreversible symptoms. Nevertheless, there is sometimes a spontaneous rebound recovery of the auditory function. This phenomenon was previously studied in the vision, another sensory function. It was called the visual survival attractor.In view of the importance that the sensory (...)
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  41.  5
    R. Kaur (2013). Sovereignty Without Hegemony, the Nuclear State, and a 'Secret Public Hearing' in India. Theory, Culture and Society 30 (3):3-28.
    How can sovereignty provide the premises to think outside of sovereignty? In other words, how is it possible to perceive of resistance to sovereignty which itself is deemed to have been caught up in the double bind of sovereignty? With a critical appraisal of theories on the ‘state of exception’ in conversation with Robert Jungk’s consideration of the ‘nuclear state’, I account for the nuclear state of exception which has acquired sovereignty in several nations in the post-Second World War scenario, (...)
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  42.  2
    L. Blackman (2000). Ethics, Embodiment and the Voice-Hearing Experience. Theory, Culture and Society 17 (5):55-74.
    This article explores how theoretical arguments in relation to the concepts of embodiment and identity can allow one to analyse and explore the cultural and psychological significance of a contemporary set of practices of the `hallucinatory self', exemplified by members of the Hearing Voices Network. The article considers work in `critical psychology', which has largely been ignored by media and cultural theory. Through specific analysis of the ways in which a group of voice-hearers are enacting their identities outside of (...)
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  43. Sigrid Bosteels, Michel Vandenbroeck & Geert Van Hove (forthcoming). Saving Deaf Children? Screening for Hearing Loss as a Public-Interest Case. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-13.
    New-born screening programs for congenital disorders and chronic disease are expanding worldwide and children “at risk” are identified by nationwide tracking systems at the earliest possible stage. These practices are never neutral and raise important social and ethical questions. An emergent concern is that a reflexive professionalism should interrogate the ever earlier interference in children’s lives. The Flemish community of Belgium was among the first to generalize the screening for hearing loss in young children and is an interesting case (...)
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  44. Mr Dan Goldstein & Dan Goldstein (1989). The Hearing Impaired Child. Routledge.
    _The Hearing Impaired Child_ introduces the background issues of hearing impairment then discusses specific aspects. These include causes of hearing loss, speech and language, personality and emotional development, and careers. Appendices provide checklists for language acquisition and reading and writing skills, lists of useful addresses, a helpful glossary and references for further reading.
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  45. Melanie A. Ferguson & Helen Henshaw (2015). Auditory Training Can Improve Working Memory, Attention, and Communication in Adverse Conditions for Adults with Hearing Loss. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  46. Eline B. Petersen, Malte Wã¶Stmann, Jonas Obleser, Stefan Stenfelt & Thomas Lunner (2015). Hearing Loss Impacts Neural Alpha Oscillations Under Adverse Listening Conditions. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  47. Antje Heinrich, Helen Henshaw & Melanie A. Ferguson (2015). The Relationship of Speech Intelligibility with Hearing Sensitivity, Cognition, and Perceived Hearing Difficulties Varies for Different Speech Perception Tests. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  48. Martha C. Nussbaum (2004). On Hearing Women's Voices: A Reply to Susan Okin. Philosophy and Public Affairs 32 (2):193-205.
  49.  55
    Karin Murris (2013). The Epistemic Challenge of Hearing Child’s Voice. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):245-259.
  50.  10
    Jessica Phillips-Silver & Laurel J. Trainor (2007). Hearing What the Body Feels: Auditory Encoding of Rhythmic Movement. Cognition 105 (3):533-546.
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