Results for 'Heather Blair'

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  1.  38
    Letters to the Editor.Sanford G. Thatcher, James S. Stramel, Heather Blair, David Christensen, Ronald De Sousa, Timothy F. Murphy, Paul Raymont, Harold J. Dumain, Joseph A. Grispino, Todd Volker, Anto Knežević & Karen M. Kuss - 1995 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 68 (5):107 - 122.
    A letter protesting the publication of a homophobic rant in the Proceedings of the APA.
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  2.  7
    Editors' Introduction Engi: Forging Accounts of Sacred Origins.Heather Blair & Tsuyoshi Kawasaki - forthcoming - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies:1-26.
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  3.  11
    Review Of: Heather Blair, Real and Imagined: The Peak of Gold in Heian Japan. [REVIEW]Jonathan E. Thumas - 2015 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 42 (2).
  4. A Cognitive Developmental Approach to Morality: Investigating the Psychopath.R. Blair - 1995 - Cognition 57 (1):1-29.
    Various social animal species have been noted to inhibit aggressive attacks when a conspecific displays submission cues. Blair (1993) has suggested that humans possess a functionally similar mechanism which mediates the suppression of aggression in the context of distress cues. He has suggested that this mechanism is a prerequisite for the development of the moral/conventional distinction; the consistently observed distinction in subject's judgments between moral and conventional transgressions. Psychopaths may lack this violence inhibitor. A causal model is developed showing (...)
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  5.  68
    Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials.Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.) - 2010 - University of Alabama Press.
    introduction Rhetoric/Memory/Place Carole Blair, Greg Dickinson, and Brian L. Ott The story is told of the poet Simonides of Ceos who, after chanting a poem ...
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  6.  40
    Affect and the Moral‐Conventional Distinction.R. J. R. Blair - 1997 - Journal of Moral Education 26 (2):187-196.
    Abstract The effect of inducing negative, positive or neutral affect on the recall of moral and conventional transgressions and positive moral and conventional acts was examined. It was found that inducing negative affect was associated with higher recall of moral transgressions while inducing positive affect was associated with higher recall of positive moral acts. Affect induction condition did not have a significant effect on the recall of the conventional transgressions or positive acts. The results are interpreted within the Violence Inhibition (...)
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  7.  96
    Science Works Better Than That.David Blair - 2012 - The Australian Humanist 108 (108):12.
    Blair, David David Tribe, in his article, 'On science, good, bad and ugly' (AH, No. 107, Spring 2012), criticises an earlier article by Victor Bien. Bien - rightly in my view - defends present-day science in respect of three areas where science is under attack; the most prominent of these three is anthropogenic global warming (AGW). Tribe claims that, Victor Bien appears to have inflated views on the sagacity, objectivity and probity of scientists, who can be called our new (...)
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  8.  34
    Neither Jew nor Greek: A Contested Identity [Book Review].Bede Heather - 2017 - The Australasian Catholic Record 94 (3):376.
    Heather, Bede Review of: Neither jew nor Greek: A contested identity, by James D. G. Dunn, Grand Rapids and Cambridge: Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2015, pp. 946, $62.19.
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  9.  36
    The Moral Animal: Virtue, Vice, and Human Nature.Christian Miller, Berlin Heather & Shermer Michael - 2016 - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences:39-56.
    Steve Paulson, executive producer and host of To the Best of Our Knowledge, moderated a discussion with philosopher Christian Miller, neuroscientist Heather Berlin, and historian of science Michael Shermer to examine our moral ecology and its influence on our underlying assumptions about human nature.
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  10.  43
    Review Essay, Part II [Book Review].David Blair - 2013 - The Australian Humanist 109 (109):23.
    Blair, David Review of: Incognito: The secret lives of the brain, by David Eagleman, Text Publishing, Melbourne, 2011, paperback, $35.
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  11.  26
    Nuclear Power: An Urgent Need.David Blair - 2015 - Australian Humanist, The 116:18.
    Blair, David What's the best policy to deal with the catastrophe that looms due to global warming? Fundamentally, we must quickly change our sources of energy away from fossil fuels to non-carbon emitting sources - namely nuclear power and the various renewable sources. 'What's nuclear doing in there?' you may respond. 'Isn't the news about nuclear all bad?' But a growing chorus of scientists and thinkers is warning that, not only is nuclear power quite safe, but that to rule (...)
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  12.  19
    An Early Exchange on the Interpretation of Arguments in Texts.J. Anthony Blair - 2016 - Informal Logic 36 (1):83-91.
    These letters between Irving Copi and Anthony Blair exchanged in 1981 are of poss ible interest for the history of informal logic.
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  13.  32
    Review Essay, Part I [Book Review].David Blair - 2012 - The Australian Humanist 108 (108):23.
    Blair, David Review(s) of: Incognito: The secret lives of the brain, by David Eagleman, Text Publishing, Melbourne, 2011, paperback, $35.
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  14. Real Science.David Blair - 2013 - The Australian Humanist 110 (110):16.
    Blair, David Concerning David Tribe's rejoinder to my 'Science works better than that' , it's pleasing to see that there are some points on which we agree. Unfortunately he continues to make a strong and unjustified attack on the scientific community as a whole-essentially on the grounds that, of the conclusions of science that later turned out to be false, virtually all of them were at some time 'believed' by most scientists. In reply, I shall show that it is (...)
     
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  15.  19
    Americanized Comic Braggarts.Walter Blair - 1977 - Critical Inquiry 4 (2):331-349.
    During nearly two centuries, American storytellers have celebrated comic figures, ebullient showoffs who turned up on one frontier after another—in the old South, in Kentucky and Tennessee, along the great inland rivers, in the mountains and the mines and on the prairies. Often, the stories went, when these characters engaged in a favorite pastime—playfully bragging about their strength, their skill and their exploits—they used animal metaphors such as Opossum, Screamer, Half-Horse Half-Alligator, the Big Bear of Arkansas or Gamecock of the (...)
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  16. Here on Earth: An Argument for Hope [Book Review].David Blair - 2013 - The Australian Humanist 110 (110):23.
    Blair, David Review of: Here on earth: An argument for hope, by Tim Flannery, Text Publishing Co. 2010 $35.
     
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  17. Plato's Republic for Readers: A Constitution.George A. Blair - 1998 - Upa.
    Blair's new translation of Plato's Republic is more readable and accessible than any translation on the market. Blair makes a persuasive case for using "honesty" rather than "morality" when translating a key Greek term.
     
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  18. Arguments That Aren't Arguments.P. A. Minkus, J. A. Blair & R. H. Johnson - 1980 - Informal Logic: The First International Symposium, Ed. Ja Blair and Rh Johnson 69:76.
     
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  19. The Amygdala and Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex in Morality and Psychopathy.R. J. R. Blair - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (9):387-392.
  20. The Psychopath. Emotion and the Brain.R. J. R. Blair, D. Mitchell & K. Blair - 2005 - Blackwell.
    Psychopaths continue to be demonised by the media and estimates suggest that a disturbing percentage of the population has psychopathic tendencies. This timely and controversial new book summarises what we already know about psychopathy and antisocial behavior and puts forward a new case for its cause - with far-reaching implications. Presents the scientific facts of psychopathy and antisocial behavior. Addresses key questions, such as: What is psychopathy? Are there psychopaths amongst us? What is wrong with psychopaths? Is psychopathy due to (...)
     
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  21. The Recent Development of Informal Logic.Ralph H. Johnson & J. Anthony Blair - forthcoming - Informal Logic: The First International Symposium.
     
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  22. Responding to the Emotions of Others: Dissociating Forms of Empathy Through the Study of Typical and Psychiatric Populations.R. J. R. Blair - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):698-718.
    Empathy is a lay term that is becoming increasingly viewed as a unitary function within the field of cognitive neuroscience. In this paper, a selective review of the empathy literature is provided. It is argued from this literature that empathy is not a unitary system but rather a loose collection of partially dissociable neurocognitive systems. In particular, three main divisions can be made: cognitive empathy , motor empathy, and emotional empathy. The two main psychiatric disorders associated with empathic dysfunction are (...)
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  23.  48
    Comparing Ethical Ideologies Across Cultures.Catherine N. Axinn, M. Elizabeth Blair, Alla Heorhiadi & Sharon V. Thach - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):103 - 119.
    Using measures developed by Singhapakdi et al. (1996, Journal of Business ethics 15, 1131–1140) the perceived importance of ethics and social responsibility (PRESOR) is measured among MBA students in the United States, Malaysia and Ukraine revealing a stockholder view and two stakeholder views. Relativism and Idealism are also measured. The scores of MBA students are compared among each other and with those of the U.S. managers who were part of the original study. Managers'' scores tend to be significantly higher on (...)
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  24.  36
    Probative Norms for Multimodal Visual Arguments.J. Anthony Blair - 2015 - Argumentation 29 (2):217-233.
    The question, “What norms are appropriate for the evaluation of the probative merits of visual arguments?” underlies the investigation of this paper. The notions of argument and of multimodal visual argument employed in the study are explained. Then four multimodal visual arguments are analyzed and their probative merits assessed. It turns out to be possible to judge these qualities using the same criteria that apply to verbally expressed arguments. Since the sample is small and not claimed to be representative, this (...)
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  25.  30
    Argumentation as Dialectical.J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson - 1987 - Argumentation 1 (1):41-56.
  26.  19
    Argument and Its Uses (OSSA 2005 Keynote Address).J. Anthony Blair - 2004 - Informal Logic 24 (2):137-151.
    Do not define argument by its use to persuade. for other uses of arguments exist. An argument is a proposition and a reason for it. and argumentation is an interchange involving two or more parties resulting in the assertion of one or more arguments coupled with anticipated or actual critical responses. A logically good argument has grounds adeq uate for the purposes at hand (true, probable, plausible, acceptable to the audience) and the grounds provide adequate support for the conclusion. The (...)
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  27.  70
    The Limits of the Dialogue Model of Argument.J. Anthony Blair - 1997 - Argumentation 12 (2):325-339.
    The paper's thesis is that dialogue is not an adequate model for all types of argument. The position of Walton is taken as the contrary view. The paper provides a set of descriptions of dialogues in which arguments feature in the order of the increasing complexity of the argument presentation at each turn of the dialogue, and argues that when arguments of great complexity are traded, the exchanges between arguers are turns of a dialogue only in an extended or metaphorical (...)
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  28. Neuro-Cognitive Systems Involved in Morality.James Blair, A. A. Marsh, E. Finger, K. S. Blair & J. Luo - 2006 - Philosophical Explorations 9 (1):13 – 27.
    In this paper, we will consider the neuro-cognitive systems involved in mediating morality. Five main claims will be made. First, that there are multiple, partially separable neuro-cognitive architectures that mediate specific aspects of morality: social convention, care-based morality, disgust-based morality and fairness/justice. Second, that all aspects of morality, including social convention, involve affect. Third, that the neural system particularly important for social convention, given its role in mediating anger and responding to angry expressions, is ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. Fourth, that the (...)
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  29.  80
    Grapheme-Color Synaesthesia Benefits Rule-Based Category Learning.Marcus R. Watson, Mark R. Blair, Pavel Kozik, Kathleen A. Akins & James T. Enns - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1533-1540.
    Researchers have long suspected that grapheme-color synaesthesia is useful, but research on its utility has so far focused primarily on episodic memory and perceptual discrimination. Here we ask whether it can be harnessed during rule-based Category learning. Participants learned through trial and error to classify grapheme pairs that were organized into categories on the basis of their associated synaesthetic colors. The performance of synaesthetes was similar to non-synaesthetes viewing graphemes that were physically colored in the same way. Specifically, synaesthetes learned (...)
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  30. What Emotional Responding is to Blame It Might Not Be to Responsibility.R. J. R. Blair - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (2):pp. 149-151.
  31.  63
    Walton's Argumentation Schemes for Presumptive Reasoning: A Critique and Development. [REVIEW]J. Anthony Blair - 2001 - Argumentation 15 (4):365-379.
    The aim of the paper is to advance the theory of argument or inference schemes by suggesting answers to questions raised by Walton's Argumentation Schemes for Presumptive Reasoning (1996), specifically on: the relation between argument and reasoning; distinguishing deductive from presumptive schemes, the origin of schemes and the probative force of their use; and the motivation and justification for their associated critical questions.
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  32.  21
    The Emergence of Psychopathy: Implications for the Neuropsychological Approach to Developmental Disorders.R. BlaiR - 2006 - Cognition 101 (2):414-442.
  33. Somatic Markers and Response Reversal: Is There Orbitofrontal Cortex Dysfunction in Boys With Psychopathic Tendencies?R. J. R. Blair, E. Colledge & D. G. V. Mitchell - 2001 - Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 29 (6):499-511.
    This study investigated the performance of boys with psychopathic tendencies and comparison boys, aged 9 to 17 years, on two tasks believed to be sensitive to amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex func- tioning. Fifty-one boys were divided into two groups according to the Psychopathy Screening Device (PSD, P. J. Frick & R. D. Hare, in press) and presented with two tasks. The tasks were the gambling task (A. Bechara, A. R. Damasio, H. Damasio, & S. W. Anderson, 1994) and the Intradimensional/ (...)
     
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  34. Passive Avoidance Learning in Individuals with Psychopathy: Modulation by Reward but Not by Punishment.R. J. R. Blair, D. G. V. Mitchell, A. Leonard, S. Budhani, K. S. Peschardt & C. Newman - 2004 - Personality and Individual Differences 37:1179–1192.
    This study investigates the ability of individuals with psychopathy to perform passive avoidance learning and whether this ability is modulated by level of reinforcement/punishment. Nineteen psychopathic and 21 comparison individuals, as defined by the Hare Psychopathy Checklist Revised (Hare, 1991), were given a passive avoidance task with a graded reinforcement schedule. Response to each rewarding number gained a point reward specific to that number (i.e., 1, 700, 1400 or 2000 points). Response to each punishing number lost a point punishment specific (...)
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  35. Relevance, Acceptability, and Sufficiency Today.J. Blair - 2007 - Anthropology and Philosophy 8 (1/2):33-48.
    In Logical Self-Defense , Johnson and I introduced the criteria of acceptability, relevance and sufficiency as appropriate for the evaluation of arguments in the sense of reasons offered in support of a claim. These three criteria have been widely adopted, but each has been subjected to a number of criticisms; and also 30 years of research have intervened. How do these criteria stand up today? In this paper I argue that they still have a place in argument analysis and evaluation, (...)
     
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  36. The Cognitive Neuroscience of Psychopathy and Implications for Judgments of Responsibility.R. James R. Blair - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (3):149-157.
    Psychopathy is a developmental disorder associated with specific forms of emotional dysfunction and an increased risk for both frustration-based reactive aggression and goal-directed instrumental antisocial behavior. While the full behavioral manifestation of the disorder is under considerable social influence, the basis of this disorder appears to be genetic. At the neural level, individuals with psychopathy show atypical responding within the amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Moreover, the roles of the amygdala in stimulus-reinforcement learning and responding to emotional expressions and vmPFC (...)
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  37.  13
    The Rise of Note‐Taking in Early Modern Europe.Ann Blair - 2010 - Intellectual History Review 20 (3):303-316.
    The history of note?taking has only begun to be written. On the one hand, the basic functions of selecting, summarizing, storing and sorting information garnered from reading, listening, observing and thinking can be identified in most literate contexts in some form or other. On the other hand, Renaissance humanists emphasized with unprecedented success the virtues of stockpiling notes on large scales and for the long term, thanks to the availability of paper and a new abundance of books, but also to (...)
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  38.  66
    Informal Logic: An Overview.J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson - 2000 - Informal Logic 20 (2).
    In this overview article, we first explain what we take informal logic to be, discussing misconceptions and distinguishing our conception of it from competing ones; second, we briefly catalogue recent informal logic research, under 14 headings; third, we suggest four broad areas of problems and questions for future research; fourth, we describe current scholarly resources for informal logic; fifth, we discuss three implications of informal logic for philosophy in particular, and take note ofpractical consequences of a more general sort.
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  39.  6
    Humanist Methods in Natural Philosophy: The Commonplace Book.Ann Blair - 1992 - Journal of the History of Ideas 53 (4):541-551.
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  40.  20
    Errors, Efficiency, and the Interplay Between Attention and Category Learning.Mark R. Blair, Marcus R. Watson & Kimberly M. Meier - 2009 - Cognition 112 (2):330-336.
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  41. Risky Decisions and Response Reversal: Is There Evidence of Orbitofrontal Cortex Dysfunction in Psychopathic Individuals?D. G. V. Mitchell, E. Colledge & R. J. R. Blair - 2002 - Neuropsychologia 40:2013–2022.
    This study investigates the performance of psychopathic individuals on tasks believed to be sensitive to dorsolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) functioning. Psychopathic and non-psychopathic individuals, as defined by the Hare psychopathy checklist revised (PCL-R) [Hare, The Hare psychopathy checklist revised, Toronto, Ontario: Multi-Health Systems, 1991] completed a gambling task [Cognition 50 (1994) 7] and the intradimensional/extradimensional (ID/ED) shift task [Nature 380 (1996) 69]. On the gambling task, psychopathic participants showed a global tendency to choose disadvantageously. Specifically, they showed an (...)
     
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  42.  9
    Young Children's Use of Functional Information to Categorize Artifacts: Three Factors That Matter.Deborah G. Kemler Nelson, Anne Frankenfield, Catherine Morris & Elizabeth Blair - 2000 - Cognition 77 (2):133-168.
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  43.  4
    Mosaic Physics and the Search for a Pious Natural Philosophy in the Late Renaissance.Ann Blair - 2000 - Isis 91:32-58.
  44. Honor in the Military and the Possible Implication for the Traditional Separation of Jus Ad Bellum and Jus in Bello.Jacob Blair - 2011 - In Applied Ethics Series (Center for Applied Ethics and Philosophy). pp. 94-102.
    Traditional just war theory maintains that the two types of rules that govern justice in times of war, jus ad bellum (justice of war) and jus in bello (justice in war), are logically independent of one another. Call this the independence thesis. According to this thesis, a war that satisfies the ad bellum rules does not guarantee that the in bello rules will be satisfied; and a war that violates the ad bellum rules does not guarantee that the in bello (...)
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  45. Self-Defense, Proportionality, and Defensive War Against Mitigated Aggression.Jacob Blair - 2013 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):207-224.
    A nation commits mitigated aggression by threatening to kill the citizens of a victim nation if and only if they do not submit to being ruled in a non-egregiously oppressive way. Such aggression primarily threatens a nation’s common way of life . According to David Rodin, a war against mitigated aggression is automatically disproportionate, as the right of lethal self-defense only extends to protecting against being killed or enslaved. Two strategies have been adopted in response to Rodin. The first strategy (...)
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  46.  18
    Premissary Relevance.J. Anthony Blair - 1992 - Argumentation 6 (2):203-217.
    Premissary relevance is a property of arguments understood as speech act complexes. It is explicable in terms of the idea of a premise's lending support to a conclusion. Premissary relevance is a function of premises belonging to a set which authoritatively warrants an inference to a conclusion. An authoritative inference warrant will have associated with it a conditional proposition which is true— that is to say, which can be justified. The study of the Aristotelian doctrine of topoi or argument schemes (...)
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  47. Reasoning a Practical Guide for Canadian Students.Robert C. Pinto, J. Anthony Blair & Katharine Elizabeth Parr - 1993
     
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  48.  95
    Argumentation as Rational Persuasion.J. Anthony Blair - 2012 - Argumentation 26 (1):71-81.
    I argue that argumentation is not to be identified with (attempted) rational persuasion, because although rational persuasion appears to consist of arguments, some uses of arguments are not attempts at rational persuasion. However, the use of arguments in argumentative communication to try to persuade is one kind of attempt at rational persuasion. What makes it rational is that its informing ideal is to persuade on the basis of adequate grounds, grounds that make it reasonable and rational to accept the claim (...)
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  49.  37
    The Current State of Informal Logic.J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson - 1987 - Informal Logic 9 (2).
  50. Informal Logic: The First International Symposium.J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson - 1981 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 14 (4):251-253.
     
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