33 found
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Heather L. Reid [33]Heather Lynne Reid [2]
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Heather Reid
Exedra Mediterranean Center, Siracusa, Sicily
  1.  9
    Why Olympia Matters for Modern Sport.Heather L. Reid - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):159-173.
    From the modern scientific perspective, Olympia is a ruin at the far end of a fading sense of history that represents little more than the origins from which sport has continuously evolved. Quantitative measurements show continued increases in human performance, equipment efficiency and funding. But some question this athletic evolution. We worry about qualitative issues, such as virtue, meaning and beauty. The source of this contrast is a difference in values: Olympic vs. Efficiency values. Such values establish an ethos in (...)
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  2.  40
    Sport and Moral Education in Plato’s Republic.Heather L. Reid - 2007 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 34 (2):160-175.
  3.  20
    Olympic Sport and Its Lessons for Peace.Heather L. Reid - 2006 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 33 (2):205-214.
  4.  32
    Sport, Philosophy, and the Quest for Knowledge.Heather L. Reid - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (1):40-49.
  5.  8
    Responsibility, Inefficiency, and the Spirit of Sport.Heather L. Reid - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (6):22-23.
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  6.  41
    Athletic Virtue: Between East and West.Heather L. Reid - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (1):16 – 26.
    Despite the rich philosophical heritage of the East, the connection between athletics and education for character or virtue is more commonly associated with the West. Classical Eastern philosophy does focus on virtue, but it seems to exclude sport as a means of cultivation since the Confucian is uninterested in victory and the Daoist seeks passivity and avoids contention. A closer look reveals, however, that Eastern conceptions of virtue have much in common with those of Ancient Greece so often linked to (...)
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  7.  31
    Was the Roman Gladiator an Athlete?Heather L. Reid - 2006 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 33 (1):37-49.
  8.  13
    Plato's Gymnasium.Heather L. Reid - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (2):170-82.
  9.  19
    Aristotle's Pentathlete.Heather L. Reid - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (2):183-94.
  10.  19
    Wrestling with Socrates.Heather L. Reid - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (2):157-69.
  11.  9
    Boxing with Tyrants.Heather L. Reid - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (2):146-56.
  12.  7
    Olympia: Running Towards Truth.Heather L. Reid - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (2):136-45.
  13.  2
    Sport, Education, and the Meaning of Victory.Heather L. Reid - 1998 - The Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 38:26-31.
    Sport was included in ancient educational systems because it was thought to promote aretê or human excellence which could be applied to almost any endeavor in life. The goal of most modern scholastic athletic programs might be better summed up in a word: winning. Is this a sign that we have lost touch with the age-old rationale for including sport in education? I argue that it need not be by showing that we value winning precisely for the virtues associated with (...)
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  14. Looking at Beauty to Kalon in Western Greece: Selected Essays From the 2018 Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece.Heather L. Reid & Tony Leyh (eds.) - 2019 - Parnassos Press-Fonte Aretusa.
    The ancient Greek word kalon can be translated as beautiful, good, noble, or fine—yet somehow it transcends any one of those concepts. In art and literature, it can apply straightforwardly to figures like Helen or Aphrodite, or enigmatically to the pais kalos: the youthful athlete that decorates so much sympotic pottery. In the philosophy of Plato, Aristotle and Plotinus, meanwhile, it takes on an ethical, even transcendent dimension. And yet, the thread between a beautiful painting and the Platonic form of (...)
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  15.  4
    Defining Sport: Conceptions and Borderlines.Shawn E. Klein, Chad Carlson, Francisco Javier López Frías, Kevin Schieman, Heather L. Reid, John McClelland, Keith Strudler, Pam R. Sailors, Sarah Teetzel, Charlene Weaving, Chrysostomos Giannoulakis, Lindsay Pursglove, Brian Glenney, Teresa González Aja, Joan Grassbaugh Forry, Brody J. Ruihley, Andrew Billings, Coral Rae & Joey Gawrysiak (eds.) - 2016 - Lexington Books.
    This book examines influential conceptions of sport and then analyses the interplay of challenging borderline cases with the standard definitions of sport. It is meant to inspire more thought and debate on just what sport is, how it relates to other activities and human endeavors, and what we can learn about ourselves by studying sport.
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  16. Athletics and Philosophy in Ancient Greece and Rome: Contests of Virtue.Heather L. Reid - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (2):109-234.
     
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  17.  26
    Contemporary Athletics and Ancient Greek Ideals.Heather L. Reid - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (3):359-361.
  18.  14
    Ethics & Sport.Heather L. Reid - 1999 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 26 (1):113-116.
  19.  22
    Olympic Epistemology: The Athletic Roots of Philosophical Reasoning.Heather L. Reid - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 47:19-28.
    The ancient world witnessed a meaningful transition in the conception of human thought and belief. What some have called the “discovery” of the mind can also be understood as a release from dependence on oracular wisdom and mythological explanation, made possible by the invention of more reliable and democratic methods for discovering and explaining truths. During roughly the same epoch, Hellenic sport distinguished itself by developing objective mechanisms for selecting single winners from varied pools of contestants. Is there a connection? (...)
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  20.  45
    Olympic Sacrifice: A Modern Look at an Ancient Tradition: Heather L. Reid.Heather L. Reid - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 73:197-210.
    The inspiration for this paper came rather unexpectedly. In February 2006, I made the long trip from my home in Sioux City, Iowa, to Torino, Italy in order to witness the Olympic Winter Games. Barely a month later, I found myself in California at the newly-renovated Getty Villa, home to one of the world's great collections of Greco-Roman antiquities. At the Villa I attended a talk about a Roman mosaic depicting a boxing scene from Virgil's Aeneid. The tiny tiles showed (...)
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  21.  41
    Plato’s Socrates as Educator. [REVIEW]Heather L. Reid - 2003 - Teaching Philosophy 26 (2):188-192.
  22.  19
    Sages, Heroes, and The Battle for Cycling’s Soul.Heather L. Reid - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):51-66.
    Using my experience at a stage of the 2014 Giro d'Italia, I argue that de is the soul of cycling and that ancient Chinese philosophy's insight into the conditions that promote de may help the sport. I compare the relationship between sages and virtuous practitioners, to the ancient Greek relationship between heroes and athletes, both of which depend on the performance of de. I also criticize modern cycling for its focus on technology, stark commercialism, and emphasis on the individual, prescribing (...)
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  23.  10
    Sports, Virtues and Vices: Morality Plays: By Mike McNamee. Published 2007 by Routledge, London and New York.Heather L. Reid - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (2):263-265.
  24.  5
    Sports, Virtues and Vices: Morality Plays: By Mike McNamee. Published 2007 by Routledge, London and New York.Heather L. Reid - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (2):263-265.
  25.  16
    The Bloomsbury Companion to the Philosophy of Sport.Heather L. Reid - 2015 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 9 (1):83-86.
  26.  16
    The Beginnings of Professional Sport - Roubineau Milon de Crotone Ou l'Invention du Sport. Pp. 355, Ills, Maps. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 2016. Paper, €22. Isbn: 978-2-13-065369-1. [REVIEW]Heather L. Reid - 2017 - The Classical Review 67 (2):457-459.
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  27.  2
    The Ethics of Efficiency.Heather L. Reid - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 63:25-32.
    Ethics in sport demand not only that we respect ourselves and others, but also that we respect sport itself. But the question of respecting sport seems to create a kind of moral dilemma between the obligation to “play one’s best” by maximizing performance, and the obligation to follow rules and traditions that ban the use of ergogenic aids. It is often argued that bans on performance-enhancing substances, equipment, and training techniques are paternalistic and violate athletes’ liberty to rationally accept risks (...)
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  28.  2
    The Educational Value of Plato’s Early Socratic Dialogues.Heather L. Reid - 1998 - The Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 43:113-118.
    When contemplating the origins of philosophical paideia one is tempted to think of Socrates, perhaps because we feel that Socrates has been a philosophical educator to us all. But it is Plato and his literary genius that we have to thank as his dialogues preserve not just Socratic philosophy, but also the Socratic educational experience. Educators would do well to better understand Plato's pedagogical objectives in the Socratic dialogues so that we may appreciate and utilize them in our own educational (...)
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  29. The Freedom of the Long-Distance Runner.Heather L. Reid - 2007 - In Michael W. Austin (ed.), Running and Philosophy: A Marathon for the Mind. Blackwell.
     
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  30.  13
    The “Hand of God”'S: Essays in the Philosophy of Sport By Claudio M. Tamburrini. Published 2000 by Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis, Box 222, SE-405 30, Sweden. [REVIEW]Heather L. Reid - 2002 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 29 (2):182-186.
  31.  1
    The “Hand of God”?: Essays in the Philosophy of Sport.Heather L. Reid - 2002 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 29 (2):182-186.
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  32.  45
    The Political Heritage of the Olympic Games: Relevance, Risks, and Possible Rewards.Heather L. Reid - 2012 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (2):108-122.
    The Olympic movement sometimes claims that sport has nothing to do with politics, yet its goal of promoting peace is explicitly political. The Olympics' association with peace, furthermore, is inherited from the ancient version of the festival which took place in a very distant time and place. This essay examines the ancient political heritage of the Olympic Games and questions its relevance to such modern Olympic challenges as globalisation, cultural hegemony, social discrimination and environmental degradation. It suggests that these challenges (...)
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  33.  22
    The Socratic Agon: Turning Philonikia Toward Philosophia in Plato’s Dialogues.Heather L. Reid - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:173-183.
    It often surprises modern readers to find the cerebral philosopher Socrates hanging out in gymnasia and wrestling schools. We tend to downplay Socrates’ association with athletes and contest as mere literary window-dressing. I would like to suggest, to the contrary, that Plato’s depiction of Socrates as an athlete goes beyond dramatic setting and linguistic metaphor. Plato actually presents Socrates as an athlete of the soul, engaged in intellectual contest, occasionally defeating his opponents, and coaching young protégées toward victory in the (...)
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