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Heidi E. Grasswick [9]Heidi Grasswick [9]Heidi Elizabeth Grasswick [1]
  1.  59
    Scientific and Lay Communities: Earning Epistemic Trust Through Knowledge Sharing.Heidi Grasswick - 2010 - Synthese 177 (3):387-409.
    Feminist philosophers of science have been prominent amongst social epistemologists who draw attention to communal aspects of knowing. As part of this work, I focus on the need to examine the relations between scientific communities and lay communities, particularly marginalized communities, for understanding the epistemic merit of scientific practices. I draw on Naomi Scheman's argument (2001) that science earns epistemic merit by rationally grounding trust across social locations. Following this view, more turns out to be relevant to epistemic assessment than (...)
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  2.  14
    Understanding Epistemic Trust Injustices and Their Harms.Heidi Grasswick - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84:69-91.
    Much of the literature concerning epistemic injustice has focused on the variety of harms done to socially marginalized persons in their capacities as potential contributors to knowledge projects. However, in order to understand the full implications of the social nature of knowing, we must confront the circulation of knowledge and the capacity of epistemic agents to take up knowledge produced by others and make use of it. I argue that members of socially marginalized lay communities can suffer epistemic trust injustices (...)
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  3.  81
    Individuals-in-Communities: The Search for a Feminist Model of Epistemic Subjects.Heidi E. Grasswick - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (3):85-120.
    : Feminist epistemologists have found the atomistic view of knowers provided by classical epistemology woefully inadequate. An obvious alternative for feminists is Lynn Hankinson Nelson's suggestion that it is communities that know. However, I argue that Nelson's view is problematic for feminists, and I offer instead a conception of knowers as "individuals-in-communities." This conception is preferable, given the premises and goals of feminist epistemologists, because it emphasizes the relations between knowers and their communities and the relevance of these relations for (...)
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  4. Feminist Epistemology as Social Epistemology.Heidi Grasswick - 2002 - Social Epistemology 16 (3):185-196.
    More than one philosopher has expressed puzzlement at the very idea of feminist epistemology. Metaphysics and epistemology, sometimes called the 'core' areas of philosophy, are supposed to be immune to questions of value and justice. Nevertheless, many philosophers have raised epistemological questions starting from feminist-motivated moral and political concerns. The field is burgeoning; a search of the Philosopher's Index reveals that although nothing was published before 1981 that was categorized as both feminist and epistemology, soon after, the rate of publication (...)
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  5. Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science: Power in Knowledge.Heidi Grasswick - 2011 - Springer.
  6.  85
    Feminist Social Epistemology.Heidi Grasswick - 2006 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  7. From Feminist Thinking to Ecological Thinking: Determining the Bounds of Community.Heidi E. Grasswick - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):150-160.
  8.  16
    From Feminist Thinking to Ecological Thinking: Determining the Bounds of Community.Heidi E. Grasswick - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):150-160.
  9. Recognition, Responsibility, and Rights: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory.Heidi Grasswick, Cressida J. Heyes, Cheryl L. Hughes, Alison M. Jaggar, Marìa Pìa Lara, Bonnie Mann, Norah Martin, Diana Tietjens Meyers, Kate Parsons, Misha Strauss, Margaret Urban Walker, Abby Wilkerson & IrisMarion Young - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This collection of papers by prominent feminist thinkers advances the positive feminist project of remapping the moral by developing theory that acknowledges the diversity of women.
     
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  10.  27
    The Normative Failure of Fuller's Social Epistemology.Heidi E. Grasswick - 2001 - Social Epistemology 16 (2):133 – 148.
    One of the major themes of Steve Fuller's project of social epistemology is a reconciliation of the normative concerns of epistemologists with the empirical concerns of sociologists of knowledge. Fuller views social epistemologists as knowledge policy makers, who will provide direction for improvements in the cognitive division of labour. However, this paper argues that Fuller's conception of knowledge production and his approval of a panglossian approach to epistemology fail to provide the normative force he claims, and leave us unable to (...)
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  11.  18
    Questioning the Role of Epistemic Agency: A Response to Calvert-Minor.Heidi Grasswick - 2011 - Social Epistemology 25 (4):361 - 369.
    In ??Epistemological communities? and the problem of epistemic agency? (Social Epistemology 25 (4): 341?360), Chris Calvert-Minor outlines Lynn Hankinson Nelson?s theory of evidence and her claims with respect to communities as primary epistemic agents, and criticizes both Nelson and her critics (including myself) for their undue emphasis on epistemic agency. Calvert-Minor argues instead for an epistemology framed around practises rather than epistemic agents. I argue that Calvert-Minor?s criticism that epistemic agency plays too central a role in the epistemology of Nelson (...)
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  12.  93
    Book Review: Anne Fausto-Sterling. The Science and Social World of Sex and Sexuality: A Review of Sexing the Body: Gender Politics and the Construction of Sexuality New York: Basic Books, 2000; and Edward Stein. The Mismeasure of Desire: The Science, Theory, and Ethics of Sexual Orientation. [REVIEW]Heidi E. Grasswick - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (3):203-208.
  13.  31
    Climate Change Science and Responsible Trust: A Situated Approach.Heidi Grasswick - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (3):541-557.
    I adopt a situated approach to the question of what would constitute responsible trust and/or distrust in climate change science, and I identify some of the major challenges for laypersons in their attempts to know well by placing their trust in climate change experts. I examine evidence that white males, as a group of relative privilege, are more likely to distrust the institutions of climate change science than are other demographic groups, and use this example to consider specific challenges facing (...)
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  14.  15
    Mapping the Maze of Feminist Philosophy of Science.Heidi E. Grasswick - 2008 - Metascience 17 (2):231-235.
  15.  29
    Leaving Dr Pangloss Behind.Heidi Grasswick - 2002 - Social Epistemology 16 (4):377 – 382.
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  16.  11
    The Science and Social World of Sex and Sexuality.Heidi E. Grasswick - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (3):203-208.
  17.  2
    Book Review: Anne Fausto-Sterling. The Science and Social World of Sex and Sexuality: A Review of Sexing the Body: Gender Politics and the Construction of Sexuality New York: Basic Books, 2000; and Edward Stein. The Mismeasure of Desire: The Science, Theory, and Ethics of Sexual Orientation. [REVIEW]Heidi E. Grasswick - 2004 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 19 (3):203-208.
  18. Recognition, Responsibility, and Rights: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory.Iris Marion Young, Diana T. Meyers, Misha Strauss, Cressida Heyes, Kate Parsons & Heidi E. Grasswick - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In the words of Catharine MacKinnon, "a woman is not yet a name for a way of being human." In other words, women are still excluded, as authors and agents, from identifying what it is to be human and what therefore violates the dignity and integrity of humans. Recognition, Responsibility, and Rights is written in response to that failure. This collection of essays by prominent feminist thinkers advances the positive feminist project of remapping the moral landscape by developing theory that (...)
     
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