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  1.  15
    Building Theory at the Intersection of Ecological Sustainability and Strategic Management.Helen Borland, Véronique Ambrosini, Adam Lindgreen & Joëlle Vanhamme - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (2):293-307.
    This article builds theory at the intersection of ecological sustainability and strategic management literature—specifically, in relation to dynamic capabilities literature. By combining industrial organization economics–based, resource-based, and dynamic capability–based views, it is possible to develop a better understanding of the strategies that businesses may follow, depending on their managers’ assumptions about ecological sustainability. To develop innovative strategies for ecological sustainability, the dynamic capabilities framework needs to be extended. In particular, the sensing–seizing–maintaining competitiveness framework should operate not only within the boundaries (...)
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  2.  30
    Sustainability, Epistemology, Ecocentric Business, and Marketing Strategy: Ideology, Reality, and Vision. [REVIEW]Helen Borland & Adam Lindgreen - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):173-187.
    This conceptual article examines the relationship between marketing and sustainability through the dual lenses of anthropocentric and ecocentric epistemology. Using the current anthropocentric epistemology and its associated dominant social paradigm, corporate ecological sustainability in commercial practice and business school research and teaching is difficult to achieve. However, adopting an ecocentric epistemology enables the development of an alternative business and marketing approach that places equal importance on nature, the planet, and ecological sustainability as the source of human and other species’ well-being, (...)
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  3.  15
    Seeing Versus Doing: How Businesses Manage Tensions in Pursuit of Sustainability.Jay Joseph, Helen Borland, Marc Orlitzky & Adam Lindgreen - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (2):349-370.
    Management of organizational tensions can facilitate the simultaneous advancement of economic, social, and environmental priorities. The approach is based on managers identifying and managing tensions between the three priorities, by employing one of the three strategic responses. Although recent work has provided a theoretical basis for such tension acknowledgment and management, there is a dearth of empirical studies. We interviewed 32 corporate sustainability managers across 25 forestry and wood-products organizations in Australia. Study participants were divided into two groups: those considered (...)
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