Results for 'Helen Crowley'

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  1.  31
    On Your Head Be It Sworn: Oath and Virtue in Euripides'Helen.C. A. Helen - 2009 - Classical Quarterly 59:1-7.
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  2. Aristotle.T. J. Crowley - 2015 - Acumen Publishing.
    This careful and engaging introduction to Aristotle equips readers of ancient philosophy and classics with an intellectual map that will guide their further exploration within the terrains of Aristotelian philosophy and logic. The book does not seek to provide a verdict or to persuade the reader of the usefulness of Aristotle's ideas. Instead it offers a comprehensive introduction to key philosophical areas while situating the reader within the ongoing intellectual debates on Aristotle's significance and relevance. Crowley's book allows an (...)
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  3. Beach-la-Mar to Bislama: The Emergence of a National Language in Vanuatu.Terry Crowley - 1990 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Oxford Studies in Language Contact Series editors: Professor Suzanne Romaine, Merton College, Oxford and Dr Peter Mülhäusler, Linacre College, Oxford This series aims to make available a collection of research monographs which present case studies of language contact around the world. The series will consider factors which give rise to language contact and the consequences of such contact in a broad inter-disciplinary context. Given the prevalence of language contact in communities throughout the world, there are as yet insufficient studies to (...)
     
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  4.  74
    Neuroethics and National Security.Turhan Canli, Susan Brandon, William Casebeer, Philip J. Crowley, Don DuRousseau, Henry T. Greely & Alvaro Pascual-Leone - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):3 – 13.
  5. Loose Constitutivity and Armchair Philosophy.Jonathan M. Weinberg & Stephen J. Crowley - 2009 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 2 (2):177-195.
    Standard philosophical methodology which proceeds by appeal to intuitions accessible "from the armchair" has come under criticism on the basis of empirical work indicating unanticipated variability of such intuitions. Loose constitutivity---the idea that intuitions are partly, but not strictly, constitutive of the concepts that appear in them---offers an interesting line of response to this empirical challenge. On a loose constitutivist view, it is unlikely that our intuitions are incorrect across the board, since they partly fix the facts in question. But (...)
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  6.  41
    Aristotle's 'So-Called Elements'.Timothy Crowley - 2008 - Phronesis 53 (3):223-242.
    Aristotle's use of the phrase τὰ καλούμενα στοιχεȋα is usually taken as evidence that he does not really think that the things to which this phrase refers, namely, fire, air, water, and earth, are genuine elements. In this paper I question the linguistic and textual grounds for taking the phrase τὰ καλούμενα στοιχεȋα in this way. I offer a detailed examination of the significance of the phrase, and in particular I compare Aristotle's general use of the Greek participle καλούμενος (-η, (...)
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  7. How “Weak” Mindreaders Inherited the Earth.Cameron Buckner, Adam Shriver, Stephen Crowley & Colin Allen - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):140-141.
    Carruthers argues that an integrated faculty of metarepresentation evolved for mindreading and was later exapted for metacognition. A more consistent application of his approach would regard metarepresentation in mindreading with the same skeptical rigor, concluding that the “faculty” may have been entirely exapted. Given this result, the usefulness of Carruthers’ line-drawing exercise is called into question.
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  8.  10
    Directives for Retained DNA: Preferences of Adolescent Patients with Substance and Conduct Problems and Their Siblings.Marilyn Coors, Susan Mikulich-Gilbertson, Kristen Raymond, Shannon Stover, Thomas Crowley, Sandra Brown & Susan Tapert - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):77-79.
  9. Aesthetic Judgment and Cultural Relativism.Daniel J. Crowley - 1958 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 17 (2):187-193.
  10.  35
    An African Aesthetic.Daniel J. Crowley - 1966 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 24 (4):519-524.
  11.  27
    Memory, Identity, Community: The Idea of Narrative in the Human Sciences (Review). [REVIEW]Sharon Crowley - 2000 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (2):187-191.
  12.  28
    History (J.W.I.) Lee A Greek Army on the March: Soldiers and Survival in Xenophon's Anabasis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Pp. Xii + 323. £55. 9780521870689. [REVIEW]Jason Crowley - 2009 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:177-.
  13.  16
    Field Notes.Mary Crowley - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (5):p. c2.
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  14.  26
    Catholicity, Inculturation and Newman's Sensus Fidelium.Paul G. Crowley - 1992 - Heythrop Journal 33 (2):161–174.
  15.  23
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on "Neuroethics and National Security".Turhan Canli, Susan Brandon, William Casebeer, Philip J. Crowley, Don DuRousseau, Henry T. Greely & Alvaro Pascual-Leones - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):W1 – W3.
  16.  19
    The Advertising Industry's Defense of its First Amendment Rights.John H. Crowley - 1993 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 8 (1):5 – 16.
    Advertising spokespersons have been defending their industry against tobacco and alcohol advertising bans by claiming the bans will do no good. In mature categories, they say advertising does not attract new users, but merely causes people to switch brands. This article contends that such an argument is based on legal pragmatism and will eventually fail because the public does not believe it. It suggests an ethical defense based on the public's right to know.
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  17.  16
    Justice as a Frame for Health Reform.Mary Crowley - 2008 - Hastings Center Report 38 (1):3-3.
  18.  11
    History (M.R.) Christ The Bad Citizen in Classical Athens. Cambridge UP, 2006. Pp. Xi + 250. £48.00. 9780521864329.Jason Crowley - 2008 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 128:223-.
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  19.  10
    Technology, Truth and Language: The Crisis of Theological Discourse.Paul Crowley - 1991 - Heythrop Journal 32 (3):323–339.
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  20. Body, Gender, Gurlesque, Intersex.Vicki Crowley - 2008 - In Nicole Anderson & Katrina Schlunke (eds.), Cultural Theory in Everyday Practice. Oxford University Press.
  21.  10
    Review of Elisabeth A. Lloyd, Science, Politics, and Evolution[REVIEW]Stephen Crowley - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (10).
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  22.  20
    Formless: Ways in and Out of Form.Patrick Crowley & Paul Hegarty (eds.) - 2005 - Peter Lang.
    The paper in this volume challenge the concept of form and aim to set out, explore and develop different theories and examples of 'the formless'.
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  23.  5
    Pass the Jelly: Tales of Ordinary Enlightenment: A Memoir.Gary Crowley - 2009 - Sentient Publications.
    This book is both very funny and unexpectedly profound.
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  24. Roger Bacon.Theodore Crowley - 1950 - Louvain, Éditions De l'Institut Supérieur De Philosophie.
     
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  25.  15
    Sidney Hook: A Bibliography.John Dennis Crowley - 1967 - Saint Louis University.
  26. Transcendence.Theodore Crowley - 1970 - Belfast, Queen's University.
  27. How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape From a Chinese Room.William J. Rapaport - 2006 - Minds and Machines 16 (4):381-436.
    A computer can come to understand natural language the same way Helen Keller did: by using “syntactic semantics”—a theory of how syntax can suffice for semantics, i.e., how semantics for natural language can be provided by means of computational symbol manipulation. This essay considers real-life approximations of Chinese Rooms, focusing on Helen Keller’s experiences growing up deaf and blind, locked in a sort of Chinese Room yet learning how to communicate with the outside world. Using the SNePS computational (...)
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  28. Helen Frowe’s “Practical Account of Self-Defence”: A Critique.Uwe Steinhoff - 2013 - Public Reason 5 (1):87-96.
    Helen Frowe has recently offered what she calls a “practical” account of self-defense. Her account is supposed to be practical by being subjectivist about permissibility and objectivist about liability. I shall argue here that Frowe first makes up a problem that does not exist and then fails to solve it. To wit, her claim that objectivist accounts of permissibility cannot be action-guiding is wrong; and her own account of permissibility actually retains an objectivist (in the relevant sense) element. In (...)
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  29.  93
    Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room.Jason Ford - 2011 - Minds and Machines 21 (1):57-72.
    William Rapaport, in “How Helen Keller used syntactic semantics to escape from a Chinese Room,” (Rapaport 2006), argues that Helen Keller was in a sort of Chinese Room, and that her subsequent development of natural language fluency illustrates the flaws in Searle’s famous Chinese Room Argument and provides a method for developing computers that have genuine semantics (and intentionality). I contend that his argument fails. In setting the problem, Rapaport uses his own preferred definitions of semantics and syntax, (...)
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  30.  44
    O vrijednosti i bezvrijednosti humanističkih nauka: Poučci Helen Small.Iris Vidmar - 2016 - Култура (153):167-182.
    One of the most contentious question in today’s discussions on the educational policies concerns the role and values of the humanities in contemporary society and education. Many see the humanities as empty, unnecessary, inefficient, phony and worthless. This paper offers a rundown of arguments adduced to support this view, followed by an overview of Helen Small’s The Value of the Humanities, which offers an exceptionally critical and insightful analysis into the current debate over the value of the humanities. The (...)
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  31.  37
    Inbreeding, Eugenics, and Helen Dean King (1869-1955).Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie - 2007 - Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):467 - 507.
    Helen Dean King's scientific work focused on inbreeding using experimental data collected from standardized laboratory rats to elucidate problems in human heredity. The meticulous care with which she carried on her inbreeding experiments assured that her results were dependable and her theoretical explanations credible. By using her nearly homozygous rats as desired commodities, she also was granted access to venues and people otherwise unavailable to her as a woman. King's scientific career was made possible through her life experiences. She (...)
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  32.  51
    Pluralism, Social Action and the Causal Space of Human Behavior: Helen Longino: Studying Human Behavior: How Scientists Investigate Aggression and Sexuality. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2013, 256pp, $25 PB.James Tabery, Alex Preda & Helen Longino - 2014 - Metascience 23 (3):443-459.
    James Tabery Helen Longino’s Studying Human Behavior is an overdue effort at a nonpartisan evaluation of the many scientific disciplines that study the nature and nurture of human behavior, arguing for the acceptance of the strengths and weaknesses of all approaches. After years of conflict, Longino makes the pluralist case for peaceful coexistence. Her analysis of the approaches raises the following question: how are we to understand the pluralistic relationship among the peacefully coexisting approaches? Longino is ironically rather unpluralistic (...)
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  33. “Knowing Things in Common”: Sheila Jasanoff and Helen Longino on the Social Nature of Knowledge.Jaana Eigi - 2013 - Acta Baltica Historiae Et Philosophiae Scientiarum 1 (2):26-37.
    In her analysis of the politics of biotechnology, Sheila Jasanoff argued that modern democracy cannot be understood without an analysis of the ways knowledge is created and used in society. She suggested calling these ways to “know things in common” civic epistemologies. Jasanoff thus approached knowledge as fundamentally social. The focus on the social nature of knowledge allows drawing parallels with some developments in philosophy of science. In the first part of the paper, I juxtapose Jasanoff’s account with the philosopher (...)
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  34. Two Millian Arguments: Using Helen Longino’s Approach to Solve the Problems Philip Kitcher Targeted with His Argument on Freedom of Inquiry.Jaana Eigi - 2012 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 5 (1):44-63.
    Philip Kitcher argued that the freedom to pursue one's version of the good life is the main aim of Mill's argument for freedom of expression. According to Kitcher, in certain scientific fields, political and epistemological asymmetries bias research toward conclusions that threaten this most important freedom of underprivileged groups. Accordingly, Kitcher claimed that there are Millian grounds for limiting freedom of inquiry in these fields to protect the freedom of the underprivileged. -/- I explore Kitcher's argument in light of the (...)
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  35. Yes, She Was!: Reply to Ford’s “Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room”.William J. Rapaport - 2011 - Minds and Machines 21 (1):3-17.
    Ford’s Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room claims that my argument in How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape from a Chinese Room fails because Searle and I use the terms ‘syntax’ and ‘semantics’ differently, hence are at cross purposes. Ford has misunderstood me; this reply clarifies my theory.
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  36. On the Social Nature of Objectivity: Helen Longino and Justin Biddle.Jaana Eigi - 2015 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 30 (3):449-463.
    According to Helen Longino, objectivity is necessarily social as it depends on critical interactions in com- munity. Justin Biddle argues that Longino’s account presupposes individuals that are completely open to any criticism; as such individuals are in principle able to criticise their beliefs on their own, Longino’s account is not really social. In the first part of my paper I argue that even for completely open individuals, criticism for maintaining objectivity is only possible in community. In the second part (...)
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  37. Dog-Helen and Homeric Insult.Margaret Graver - 1995 - Classical Antiquity 14 (1):41-61.
    Helen's self-disparagement is an anomaly in epic diction, and this is especially true of those instances where she refers to herself as "dog" and "dog-face." This essay attempts to show that Helen's dog-language, in that it remains in conflict with other features of her characterization, has some generic significance for epic, helping to establish the superiority of epic performance over competing performance types which treated her differently. The metaphoric use of χύων and its derivatives has not been well (...)
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  38.  70
    Are We Agents at All? Helen Steward's Agency Incompatibilism.Neil Levy - 2013 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 56 (4):386-399.
    ABSTRACT In A Metaphysics for Freedom and related papers, Helen Steward advances a new argument for incompatibilism. Though she concedes that the luck objection is persuasive with regard to existing versions of libertarianism, she claims that agency itself is incompatible with determinism: we are only agents at all if we are able to settle matters concerning our movements, where settling something requires that prior to our settling it lacked sufficient conditions. She argues that genuine agents settle very fine-grained aspects (...)
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  39.  22
    I—Helen E. Longino.Helen E. Longino - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):19-35.
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  40. "Pochwała Heleny" Gorgiasza Z Leontinoi (Gorgias' "Helen").Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2012 - Studia Antyczne I Mediewistyczne 10:17-36.
    This is the introduction and the translation of Gorgias' "Helen". The speech is considered to be one of the most interesting pieces of early Greek rhetoric not only because of its rhetorical, but also because of its philosophical value. There is no doubt that it sets out the outlines of the sophistic conception of logos and (along with another Gorgias' speech Palamedes) represents the starting point for the Plato's critique of Gorgias' rhetoric in the dialogue "Gorgias'.
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  41. Elusive Freedom? A Reply to Helen Beebee.Michael Huemer - 2004 - Philosophical Review 113 (3):411-416.
    I defend my earlier argument for incompatibilism, against Helen Beebee’s reply. Beebee’s reply would allow one to have free will despite that nothing one does counts as an exercise of that freedom, and would grant one the ability to do A even when one’s doing A requires something to happen that one cannot bring about and that in fact will not happen.
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  42.  90
    The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds, Edited by Helen Beebee and Nigel Sabbarton-Leary.J. Leech - 2013 - Mind 122 (485):253-257.
    Book review of "The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds", edited by Helen Beebee and Nigel Sabbarton-Leary (Routledge, 2010).
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  43.  65
    Replies to Randolph Clarke, John Bishop, and Helen Beebee.Helen Steward - 2014 - Res Philosophica 91 (3):547-557.
    Contains the author's responses to comments by the three named authors on her book, 'A Metaphysics for Freedom'.
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  44.  49
    Helen Keller as Cognitive Scientist.Justin Leiber - 1996 - Philosophical Psychology 9 (4):419 – 440.
    Nature's experiments in isolation—the wild boy of Aveyron, Genie, their name is hardly legion—are by their nature illusive. Helen Keller, blind and deaf from her 18th month and isolated from language until well into her sixth year, presents a unique case in that every stage in her development was carefully recorded and she herself, graduate of Radcliffe College and author of 14 books, gave several careful and insightful accounts of her linguistic development and her cognitive and sensory situation. Perhaps (...)
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  45.  25
    The Helen Scene in Euripides' Troades.Michael Lloyd - 1984 - Classical Quarterly 34 (02):303-.
    Troades has often been thought to lack any coherent structure, and this has been variously attributed to its being the last play of the trilogy and to Euripides' overriding concern to impress the horrors of war upon his fellow Athenians. More recently, however, attention has been drawn to how the constant presence of Hecuba gives unity to the play and to how it is articulated by the striking entries of Cassandra, Andromache, and Helen. Cassandra and Andromache enter in mock (...)
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  46. Helen Macfarlane: A Feminist, Revolutionary Journalist, and Philosopher in Mid-Nineteenth-Century England.David Black - 2004 - Lexington Books.
    Helen Macfarlane, revolutionary social critic, feminist and Hegelian philosopher was the first English translator of Karl Marx and Fredrich Engel's theCommunist Manifesto. Her original translation is included in this edition. Marx publicly admired her as a rare and original thinker and journalist. This book recreates her intellectual and political world at a key turning point in European history.
     
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  47.  26
    On a Darkling Plain: The Art and Thought of Thomas Hardy. By Helen Singer.Helen Singer - 1947 - Ethics 58 (3):225-226.
  48.  36
    Helen S. Lang. The Order of Nature in Aristotle’s Physics: Place and the Elements. Xii + 324 Pp., Bibl., Index. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. $80. [REVIEW]Monte Johnson - 2004 - Isis 95 (4):687-688.
  49.  16
    The Bleak House of Surrogacy: Broidy V. St Helen's and Knowsley Health Authority. [REVIEW]Derek Morgan - 2001 - Feminist Legal Studies 9 (1):57-67.
    This note examines the British case of Broidy v. St Helen's andKnowsley Health Authority in which Margaret Broidy was unsuccessful in anegligence action against the defendant Health Authority following an emergency caesareanoperation in which a hysterectomy had been performed as `essential'. Of particularfeminist interest is the fact that Broidy's claim for, inter alia, the costs of asurrogacy arrangement to be carried out in California was refused on the basis that it wasnot reasonable – the chances of success of the (...)
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  50.  16
    Reading, Trauma and Literary Caregiving 1914-1918: Helen Mary Gaskell and the War Library.Sara Haslam - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-17.
    This article is about the relationship between reading, trauma and responsive literary caregiving in Britain during the First World War. Its analysis of two little-known documents describing the history of the War Library, begun by Helen Mary Gaskell in 1914, exposes a gap in the scholarship of war-time reading; generates a new narrative of "how," "when," and "why" books went to war; and foregrounds gender in its analysis of the historiography. The Library of Congress's T. W. Koch discovered Gaskell's (...)
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