Results for 'Helen I. Safa'

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  1.  9
    Enduring Traditions and New Directions in Feminist Ethnography in the Caribbean and Latin AmericaSister Jamaica: A Study of Women, Work, and Household in KingstonThe Myth of the Male Breadwinner: Women and Industrialization in the CaribbeanProducing Power: Ethnicity, Gender, and Class in a Caribbean WorkplaceWomen of Belize: Gender and Change in Central AmericaWomen and Social Movements in Latin America: Power From Below.Carla Freeman, Donna F. Murdock, A. Lynn Bolles, Helen I. Safa, Kevin Yelvington, Irma McClaurin & Lynn Stephen - 2001 - Feminist Studies 27 (2):423.
  2. Ikhvān Al-Ṣafā.Zabīḥ Allāh[From Old Catalog] Ṣafā - 1951
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  3. Nazar-I Mutafakkiran-I Islami Dar Barah- I Tabi at Khulasah I Az Ara- I Ikhvan-I Safa Va Biruni Va Ibn Sina Raji Bi-Jahan.Seyyed Hossein Nasr - 1964 - Danishgah-I Tihran.
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  4.  23
    O vrijednosti i bezvrijednosti humanističkih nauka: Poučci Helen Small.Iris Vidmar - 2016 - Култура (153):167-182.
    One of the most contentious question in today’s discussions on the educational policies concerns the role and values of the humanities in contemporary society and education. Many see the humanities as empty, unnecessary, inefficient, phony and worthless. This paper offers a rundown of arguments adduced to support this view, followed by an overview of Helen Small’s The Value of the Humanities, which offers an exceptionally critical and insightful analysis into the current debate over the value of the humanities. The (...)
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  5.  14
    I—Helen E. Longino.Helen E. Longino - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):19-35.
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  6.  17
    The Papers of Benjamin Franklin. Volume I by Benjamin Franklin; Leonard W. Labaree; Whitfield J. Bell,; Helen C. Boatfield; Helene H. Fineman; Benjamin Franklin and Italy by Antonio Pace. [REVIEW]I. Cohen - 1960 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 51:241-243.
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  7. Epistemologia a koncepcja sztuki w Pochwale Heleny i Obronie Palamedesa Gorgiasza z Leontinoi (Epistemology and the conception of techne in Gorgias' Helen and Palamedes).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 1999 - Acta Universitatis Nicolai Copernici, Historia XXXI 330:35-52.
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  8.  3
    Why I Left Canada: Reflections on Science and PoliticsLeopold Infeld Helen Infeld Lewis Pyenson.Lawrence Badash - 1979 - Isis 70 (4):638-638.
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  9. I Tachkatsʻ Imastasiratsʻ Grotsʻ Kʻagheal Bankʻ ("Ṛusail Ikhvan Al-Safa"). Hovhannēs - 2009 - "Nairi" Hratarakchʻutʻyun.
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  10. How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape From a Chinese Room.William J. Rapaport - 2006 - Minds and Machines 16 (4):381-436.
    A computer can come to understand natural language the same way Helen Keller did: by using “syntactic semantics”—a theory of how syntax can suffice for semantics, i.e., how semantics for natural language can be provided by means of computational symbol manipulation. This essay considers real-life approximations of Chinese Rooms, focusing on Helen Keller’s experiences growing up deaf and blind, locked in a sort of Chinese Room yet learning how to communicate with the outside world. Using the SNePS computational (...)
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  11. Helen Frowe’s “Practical Account of Self-Defence”: A Critique.Uwe Steinhoff - 2013 - Public Reason 5 (1):87-96.
    Helen Frowe has recently offered what she calls a “practical” account of self-defense. Her account is supposed to be practical by being subjectivist about permissibility and objectivist about liability. I shall argue here that Frowe first makes up a problem that does not exist and then fails to solve it. To wit, her claim that objectivist accounts of permissibility cannot be action-guiding is wrong; and her own account of permissibility actually retains an objectivist (in the relevant sense) element. In (...)
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  12.  86
    Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room.Jason Ford - 2011 - Minds and Machines 21 (1):57-72.
    William Rapaport, in “How Helen Keller used syntactic semantics to escape from a Chinese Room,” (Rapaport 2006), argues that Helen Keller was in a sort of Chinese Room, and that her subsequent development of natural language fluency illustrates the flaws in Searle’s famous Chinese Room Argument and provides a method for developing computers that have genuine semantics (and intentionality). I contend that his argument fails. In setting the problem, Rapaport uses his own preferred definitions of semantics and syntax, (...)
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  13.  23
    Inbreeding, Eugenics, and Helen Dean King (1869-1955).Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie - 2007 - Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):467 - 507.
    Helen Dean King's scientific work focused on inbreeding using experimental data collected from standardized laboratory rats to elucidate problems in human heredity. The meticulous care with which she carried on her inbreeding experiments assured that her results were dependable and her theoretical explanations credible. By using her nearly homozygous rats as desired commodities, she also was granted access to venues and people otherwise unavailable to her as a woman. King's scientific career was made possible through her life experiences. She (...)
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  14. “Knowing Things in Common”: Sheila Jasanoff and Helen Longino on the Social Nature of Knowledge.Jaana Eigi - 2013 - Acta Baltica Historiae Et Philosophiae Scientiarum 1 (2):26-37.
    In her analysis of the politics of biotechnology, Sheila Jasanoff argued that modern democracy cannot be understood without an analysis of the ways knowledge is created and used in society. She suggested calling these ways to “know things in common” civic epistemologies. Jasanoff thus approached knowledge as fundamentally social. The focus on the social nature of knowledge allows drawing parallels with some developments in philosophy of science. In the first part of the paper, I juxtapose Jasanoff’s account with the philosopher (...)
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  15. Two Millian Arguments: Using Helen Longino’s Approach to Solve the Problems Philip Kitcher Targeted with His Argument on Freedom of Inquiry.Jaana Eigi - 2012 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 5 (1):44-63.
    Philip Kitcher argued that the freedom to pursue one's version of the good life is the main aim of Mill's argument for freedom of expression. According to Kitcher, in certain scientific fields, political and epistemological asymmetries bias research toward conclusions that threaten this most important freedom of underprivileged groups. Accordingly, Kitcher claimed that there are Millian grounds for limiting freedom of inquiry in these fields to protect the freedom of the underprivileged. -/- I explore Kitcher's argument in light of the (...)
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  16.  64
    Are We Agents at All? Helen Steward's Agency Incompatibilism.Neil Levy - 2013 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 56 (4):386-399.
    ABSTRACT In A Metaphysics for Freedom and related papers, Helen Steward advances a new argument for incompatibilism. Though she concedes that the luck objection is persuasive with regard to existing versions of libertarianism, she claims that agency itself is incompatible with determinism: we are only agents at all if we are able to settle matters concerning our movements, where settling something requires that prior to our settling it lacked sufficient conditions. She argues that genuine agents settle very fine-grained aspects (...)
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  17. Yes, She Was! Reply to Ford’s “Helen KellerWas Never in a Chinese Room”.William J. Rapaport - 2011 - Minds and Machines 21 (1):3-17.
    Ford’s Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room claims that my argument in How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape from a Chinese Room fails because Searle and I use the terms ‘syntax’ and ‘semantics’ differently, hence are at cross purposes. Ford has misunderstood me; this reply clarifies my theory.
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  18. On the Social Nature of Objectivity: Helen Longino and Justin Biddle.Jaana Eigi - 2015 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 30 (3):449-463.
    According to Helen Longino, objectivity is necessarily social as it depends on critical interactions in com- munity. Justin Biddle argues that Longino’s account presupposes individuals that are completely open to any criticism; as such individuals are in principle able to criticise their beliefs on their own, Longino’s account is not really social. In the first part of my paper I argue that even for completely open individuals, criticism for maintaining objectivity is only possible in community. In the second part (...)
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  19. Elusive Freedom? A Reply to Helen Beebee.Michael Huemer - 2004 - Philosophical Review 113 (3):411-416.
    I defend my earlier argument for incompatibilism, against Helen Beebee’s reply. Beebee’s reply would allow one to have free will despite that nothing one does counts as an exercise of that freedom, and would grant one the ability to do A even when one’s doing A requires something to happen that one cannot bring about and that in fact will not happen.
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  20.  10
    ‘For Those with Eyes to See’: On the Hidden Meaning of the Animal Fable in the Rasāʾil Ikhwān Al-Ṣafāʾ.Godefroid de Callataÿ - 2018 - Journal of Islamic Studies 29 (3):357-391.
    Does the famous animal fable, as narrated by the Ikhwān al-Ṣafāʾ in Epistle 22 of their Rasāʾil, possess an inner meaning? The issue is not new, but it may be useful to address it again today, considering the recent, significant re-evaluation of the Epistles of the Brethren of Purity in the overall history of medieval thinking. It is also important to return to this issue since it was largely left aside by the editors of Epistle 22 who are part of (...)
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  21.  11
    “I Longed to Cherish Mirrored Reflections”: Mirroring and Black Female Subjectivity in Carrie Mae Weems's Art Against Shame.Robert R. Shane - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):500-520.
    Through staged photographs in which she herself is often the lead actor or through appropriation of historical photographs, contemporary African American artist Carrie Mae Weems deconstructs the shaming of the black female body in American visual culture and offers counter-hegemonic images of black female beauty. The mirror has been foundational in Western theories of subjectivity and discussions of beauty. In the artworks I analyze in this article, Weems tactically employs the mirror to engage the topos of shame in order to (...)
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  22.  5
    Elusive Freedom? A Reply to Helen Beebee.Michael Huemer - 2004 - Philosophical Review 113 (3):411-416.
    In “Van Inwagen’s Consequence Argument”, I offered a reformulation and defense of the Consequence Argument for incompatibilism, including a response to Lewis-style compatibilism. In a recent response, Helen Beebee defends Lewisian compatibilism against my argument. In the following, I will show why Beebee’s defense does not succeed.
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  23.  16
    The Body as Argument: Helen in Four Greek Texts.Nancy Worman - 1997 - Classical Antiquity 16 (1):151-203.
    Certain Greek texts depict Helen in a manner that connects her elusive body with the elusive maneuvers of the persuasive story. Her too-mobile body signals in these texts the obscurity of agency in the seduction scene and serves as a device for tracking the dynamics of desire. In so doing this body propels poetic narrative and gives structure to persuasive argumentation. Although the female figure in traditional texts is always the object of male representation, in this study I examine (...)
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  24.  35
    Helen and Heidegger: Disabled Dasein, Language and Others.Andrea Hurst - 2003 - South African Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):98-112.
    Both Heidegger's Being and Time and Helen Keller's The Story of my Life address the problem of what it means for humans to be optimally human. In reading these texts together, I hope to show that Helen's life-story confirms Heidegger's existential analyses to some extent, but also, importantly, poses a challenge to them with respect to the interrelated issues of disability, language and others. Heidegger's hermeneutic explication of what it means to be human is intended to uncover supposedly (...)
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  25.  15
    Inbreeding, Eugenics, and Helen Dean King.Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie - 2007 - Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):467-507.
    Helen Dean King's scientific work focused on inbreeding using experimental data collected from standardized laboratory rats to elucidate problems in human heredity. The meticulous care with which she carried on her inbreeding experiments assured that her results were dependable and her theoretical explanations credible. By using her nearly homozygous rats as desired commodities, she also was granted access to venues and people otherwise unavailable to her as a woman. King's scientific career was made possible through her life experiences. She (...)
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  26.  27
    A Dialog Between a Senator and a Scientist on Themes of Government Power, Science, Faith, Morality, and the Origin and Evolution of Life: Helen Astartian.Edward H. Sisson - unknown
    Plato, in his dialog Charmides, presents the question of how society can determine whether a person who claims superior expertise in a particular field of knowledge does, in fact, possess superior expertise. In the modern era, society tends to answer this question by funding institutions (universities) that award credentials to certain individuals, asserting that those individuals possess a particular expertise; and then other institutions (the journalistic media and government) are expected to defer to the credentials. When, however, the sequential reasoning (...)
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  27.  21
    This I Believe Ii: More Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women.Jay Allison & Dan Gediman (eds.) - 2008 - Henry Holt.
    A new collection of inspiring personal philosophies from another noteworthy group of people This second collection of This I Believe essays gathers seventyfive essayists—ranging from famous to previously unknown—completing the thought that begins the book’s title. With contributors who run the gamut from cellist Yo-Yo Ma to ordinary folks like a diner waitress, an Iraq War veteran, a farmer, a new husband, and many others, This I Believe II , like the first New York Times bestselling collection, showcases moving and (...)
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  28. Kritika, kontekst i zajednica: Veze između Wittgensteinova spisa O izvjesnosti i feminističke epistemologije: Criticism, context and community: Connections between Wittgenstein’s On and feminist epistemology.Carol Caraway - 2002 - Prolegomena 1 (2):155-162.
    In this article the conceptual connections between Wittgenstein’s On Certainty and the work of three contemporary feminist epistemologists: standpoint theorist Sandra Harding and feminist empiricists Helen Longino and Lynn Hankinson Nelson, are explored. The inquiry reveals both surprising similarities and important differences between Wittgensteinian and feminist epistemologies. Exploring these similarities and differences clarifies Wittgenstein’s epistemology and reveals the ways in which feminist epistemologists developed the themes from On Certainty.Članak istražuje pojmovne veze između Wittgensteinova spisa O izvjesnosti i rada triju (...)
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  29. I—What is a Continuant?Helen Steward - 2015 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 89 (1):109-123.
    In this paper, I explore the question what a continuant is, in the context of a very interesting suggestion recently made by Rowland Stout, as part of his attempt to develop a coherent ontology of processes. Stout claims that a continuant is best thought of as something that primarily has its properties at times, rather than atemporally—and that on this construal, processes should count as continuants. While accepting that Stout is onto something here, I reject his suggestion that we should (...)
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  30. "Pochwała Heleny" Gorgiasza Z Leontinoi (Gorgias' "Helen").Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2012 - Studia Antyczne I Mediewistyczne 10:17-36.
    This is the introduction and the translation of Gorgias' "Helen". The speech is considered to be one of the most interesting pieces of early Greek rhetoric not only because of its rhetorical, but also because of its philosophical value. There is no doubt that it sets out the outlines of the sophistic conception of logos and (along with another Gorgias' speech Palamedes) represents the starting point for the Plato's critique of Gorgias' rhetoric in the dialogue "Gorgias'.
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  31.  40
    I'm Glad I'm Not Me: Subjective Dissolution, Schizoanalysis and Post-Structuralist Ethics in the Films of Todd Haynes.Helen Darby - 2013 - Film-Philosophy 17 (1):330-347.
    This article reads a selection of films by Todd Haynes - Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story (1987), Velvet Goldmine (1998) and I'm Not There (2007) - through the post-structuralist lens of Deleuzian theorising about the self as a networked singularity rather than an essential subject. The overall aim of the piece is to consider Haynes' films as artefacts that require the participatory audience to be involved in their making. Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's concept of the schizo is addressed to (...)
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  32. Thomas Aquinas and the Problem of Nature in Physics II, I.Helen S. Lang - forthcoming - History of Philosophy Quarterly.
    This article considers the definition of nature as given by Aristotle in "Physics" II and the commentaries on it by Philoponus and Thomas Aquinas. Through Aristotle's definition and its treatment in two commentaries, we can see how each philosopher defines philosophy as an enterprise and the problems encompassed by it. I conclude that the conception of philosophy, and consequently its problems, is quite distinct in each case and should be considered as such; as a further consequence, the whole notion of (...)
     
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  33.  16
    Martin Buber's 'I and Thou'.Helen Wodehouse - 1945 - Philosophy 20 (75):17 - 30.
    Reading and re-reading the difficult and important small book I and Thou , by Professor Martin Buber, which Mr. Ronald Gregor Smith has translated with so much care and skill, and trying to make it clearer to myself in words of my own, I find myself at odds on the threshold with the translator's Introduction. He is explaining the title and the general theme of the book:— “There is, Buber shows, a radical difference between a man's attitude to other men (...)
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  34.  6
    Martin Buber's ‘I and Thou’.Helen Wodehouse - 1945 - Philosophy 20 (75):17.
    Reading and re-reading the difficult and important small book I and Thou, by Professor Martin Buber, which Mr. Ronald Gregor Smith has translated with so much care and skill, and trying to make it clearer to myself in words of my own, I find myself at odds on the threshold with the translator's Introduction. He is explaining the title and the general theme of the book:— “There is, Buber shows, a radical difference between a man's attitude to other men and (...)
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  35.  7
    III. Christian Ethics: Helen Oppenheimer.Helen Oppenheimer - 1969 - Religious Studies 5 (2):163-171.
    I have been asked to consider two questions: How Christian ‘oughts’ are related to Christian ‘is-es’, and, What does Christianity take flourishing to be? The background to these questions is that Christian ethics have traditionally been taken, both by supporters and opponents, as au ethic of creature-hood, sometimes quite crudely conceived. It is a sketch, but by no means a caricature, of a great deal of standard Christian thinking, to depict it as answering the two questions as follows: God is (...)
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  36.  27
    Computerizing Pompeii - Ministero per i Beni Culturali e Ambientali/Soprintendenza Archeologica di Pompei/IBM: Rediscovering Pompeii . Pp. xv + 287; 194 colour ills. Rome: ‘L'Erma’ di Bretschneider, 1992. Paper, L. 110,000. [REVIEW]Helen M. Parkins - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (1):136-137.
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  37. Justifying Defense Against Non-Responsible Threats and Justified Aggressors: The Liability Vs. The Rights-Infringement Account.Uwe Steinhoff - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):247-265.
    Even among those who find lethal defense against non-responsible threats, innocent aggressors, or justified aggressors justified even in one to one cases, there is a debate as to what the best explanation of this permissibility is. The contenders in this debate are the liability account, which holds that the non-responsible or justified human targets of the defensive measures are liable to attack, and the justified infringement account, which claims that the targets retain their right not to be attacked but may (...)
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  38.  82
    Amending and Defending Critical Contextual Empiricism.Kirstin Borgerson - 2011 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (3):435-449.
    In Science as Social Knowledge in 1990 and The Fate of Knowledge in 2002, Helen Longino develops an epistemological theory known as Critical Contextual Empiricism (CCE). Knowledge production, she argues, is an active, value-laden practice, evidence is context dependent and relies on background assumptions, and science is a social inquiry that, under certain conditions, produces social knowledge with contextual objectivity. While Longino’s work has been generally well-received, there have been a number of criticisms of CCE raised in the philosophical (...)
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  39. Agency Without Avoidability: Defusing a New Threat to Frankfurt's Counterexample Strategy.Seth Shabo - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (4):505-522.
    In this paper, I examine a new line of response to Frankfurt’s challenge to the traditional association of moral responsibility with the ability to do otherwise. According to this response, Frankfurt’s counterexample strategy fails, not in light of the conditions for moral responsibility per se, but in view of the conditions for action. Specifically, it is claimed, a piece of behavior counts as an action only if it is within the agent’s power to avoid performing it. In so far as (...)
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  40.  42
    Philosophical Equilibrism, Rationality, and the Commitment Challenge.Michele Palmira - 2018 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 118 (3):377-385.
    Helen Beebee (2018) defends a view of the aims of philosophy she calls ‘equilibrism’. Equilibrism denies that philosophy aims at knowledge and maintains that the collective aim of philosophy is ‘to find what equilibria there are that can withstand examination’ (Beebee 2018, p. 3). In this note, I probe equilibrism by focusing on how disagreement challenges our doxastic commitment to our own philosophical theories. Call this the Commitment Challenge. I argue that the Commitment Challenge comes in three varieties and (...)
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  41.  81
    My Way and Life's Highway: Replies to Steward, Smilansky, and Perry. [REVIEW]John Martin Fischer - 2008 - The Journal of Ethics 12 (2):167 - 189.
    I seek to reply to the thoughtful and challenging papers by Helen Steward, Saul Smilansky, and John Perry. Steward argues that agency itself requires access to alternative possibilities; I attempt to motivate my denial of this view. I believe that her view here is no more plausible than the view that it is unfair to hold someone morally responsible, unless he has genuine access to alternative possibilities. Smilansky contends that compatibilism is morally shallow, and that we can see this (...)
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  42.  88
    "Empiricism All the Way Down": A Defense of the Value-Neutrality of Science in Response to Helen Longino's Contextual Empiricism.Stéphanie Ruphy - 2006 - Perspectives on Science 14 (2):189-214.
    : A central claim of Longino's contextual empiricism is that scientific inquiry, even when "properly conducted", lacks the capacity to screen out the influence of contextual values on its results. I'll show first that Longino's attack against the epistemic integrity of science suffers from fatal empirical weaknesses. Second I'll explain why Longino's practical proposition for suppressing biases in science, drawn from her contextual empiricism, is too demanding and, therefore, unable to serve its purpose. Finally, drawing on Bourdieu's sociological analysis of (...)
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  43.  46
    Different Motivations, Similar Proposals: Objectivity in Scientific Community and Democratic Science Policy.Jaana Eigi - 2017 - Synthese 194 (12):4657-4669.
    The aim of the paper is to discuss some possible connections between philosophical proposals about the social organisation of science and developments towards a greater democratisation of science policy. I suggest that there are important similarities between one approach to objectivity in philosophy of science—Helen Longino’s account of objectivity as freedom from individual biases achieved through interaction of a variety of perspectives—and some ideas about the epistemic benefits of wider representation of various groups’ perspectives in science policy, as analysed (...)
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  44.  99
    Defending Lewis’s Local Miracle Compatibilism.Shane Oakley - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 130 (2):337-349.
    Helen Beebee has recently argued that David Lewis’s account of compatibilism, so-called local miracle compatibilism, allows for the possibility that agents in deterministic worlds have the ability to break or cause the breaking of a law of nature. Because Lewis’s LMC allows for this consequence, Beebee claims that LMC is untenable and subsequently that Lewis’s criticism of van Inwagen’s Consequence Argument for incompatibilism is substantially weakened. I review Beebee’s argument against Lewis’s thesis and argue that Beebee has not refuted (...)
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  45. Agential Settling Requires a Conscious Intention.Yishai Cohen - 2015 - Journal of Cognition and Neuroethics 3 (01):139-155.
    Helen Steward holds that an agent’s settling something does not require a conscious, full-fledged intention. Rather, sub-intentional acts can be instances of settling by the agent if that act is subordinated to the agent’s personal-level conscious systems. I argue that this position is mistaken, and that agential settling does in fact require a conscious intention. I argue for this claim by offering a case which on Steward’s position has counterintuitive implications. I consider a variety of ways in which Steward (...)
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  46.  8
    I—Peter Millican: Humes Old and New Four Fashionable Falsehoods, and One Unfashionable Truth.Peter Millican & Helen Beebee - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):163-199.
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  47.  59
    Hormone Research as an Exemplar of Underdetermination.P. D. Magnus - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 36 (3):559-567.
    Debates about the underdetermination of theory by data often turn on specific examples. Cases invoked often enough become familiar, even well worn. Since Helen Longino’s discussion of the case, the connection between prenatal hormone levels and gender-linked childhood behaviour has become one of these stock examples. However, as I argue here, the case is not genuinely underdetermined. We can easily imagine a possible experiment to decide the question. The fact that we would not perform this experiment is a moral, (...)
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  48.  22
    Sciences of the Soul and Intellect, Part I: An Arabic Critical Edition and English Translation of Epistles 32–36 Edited and Translated by Paul E. Walker, Ismail K. Poonawala, David Simonowitz and Godefroid de Callataÿ. [REVIEW]Anthony F. Shaker - 2018 - Journal of Islamic Studies 29 (1):84-87.
    © The Author. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comThis handsomely produced volume is the ninth of the OUP-IIS series titled Epistles of the Brethren of Purity. Inaugurated in 2008, the series is designed in part to replace several older Arabic editions of Rasāʾil Ikhwān al-Ṣafāʾ that have been published over the decades but which failed to identify their manuscript sources. Nineteen manuscripts in all were (...)
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    A Budé Edition of Soranus Paul Burguière, Danielle Gourevitch, Yves Malinas: Soranos d' Éphèse, Maladies des Femmes, Tome I, Livre 1. Texte Établi, Traduit Et Commenté. (Budé.) Pp. C+133 (Text Double); 22 Figs. Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1988. [REVIEW]Helen King - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (01):19-20.
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    I Believe in God.Paul Claudel, Agnés du Sarment, Helen Weaver & John O'Connor - 2005 - The Chesterton Review 31 (1/2):197-203.
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