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  1. Rape Myths: Is Elite Opinion Right and Popular Opinion Wrong?Helen Reece - 2013 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33 (3):445-473.
    England and Wales have recently experienced wide-ranging rape law reform and a galloping rape reporting rate but no comparable increase in rape convictions, leading many erstwhile law reformers to turn attention to attitudes. In essence, their argument is that reform has proved relatively ineffective because a range of agents hold ‘rape myths’. Despite the broad consensus that this approach has attracted, I argue that the regressiveness of current public attitudes towards rape has been overstated. The claim that rape myths are (...)
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  2.  9
    Divorcing Responsibly.Helen Reece - 2000 - Feminist Legal Studies 8 (1):65-91.
    In this article I argue that Part II of the Family LawAct 1996 gives expression to a new form ofresponsibility. I begin by suggesting thatresponsible behaviour has shifted from prohibiting orrequiring particular actions: we now exhibitresponsibility by our attitude towards our actions. I then examine where this new conception ofresponsibility has come from. Through an examinationof the work of post-liberal theorists, principallyMichael Sandel, I argue that a changing view ofpersonhood within post-liberal theory has led to aquestioning of the possibility of (...)
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  3.  23
    The Pitfalls of Positive Parenting.Helen Reece - 2013 - Ethics and Education 8 (1):42 - 54.
    Contemporary official parenting advice about disciplining children can be boiled down to ?Be nice?. I first expand on this claim, drawing on primarily Birth to Five and secondarily Parentchannel.tv, showing that ?Be nice? breaks down into the absence of punishment and the expansion of both positive reinforcement and leading by example, these three components comprising an approach that is popularly described as positive parenting. Second, I examine the ways in which such apparently innocuous advice could be damaging: positive parenting is (...)
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  4. Reckless Trials? The Criminalization of the Sexual Transmission of HIV.Daniel Monk, Helen Reece, C. Hunt, Tim Reynolds, H. Rishi, A. Buzian, E. Hill, G. Barker, Matthew Weait & J. Lazarus - 2009 - Radical Philosophy 156:2-6.
  5.  7
    Gender, Choice and Commitment: Women Solicitors in England and Wales and the Struggle for Equal Status, Hilary Sommerlad and Peter Sanderson.Helen Reece - 2000 - Legal Ethics 3 (1):104-110.
  6.  40
    Law and Science.Helen Reece (ed.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    This book is the first volume in the series and explores the relationship of law and science, with a particular focus on the role of science as evidence.
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  7.  16
    Rebecca Probert (Ed): Family Life and the Law: Under One Roof. [REVIEW]Helen Reece - 2008 - Feminist Legal Studies 16 (3):383-385.
  8.  11
    “Unpalatable Messages”? Feminist Analysis of United Kingdom Legislative Discourse on Stalking 1996–1997.Helen Reece - 2011 - Feminist Legal Studies 19 (3):205-230.
    North American scholarship has charted resonances between 1990s legislative and feminist discourse concerning violence against women. Feminist critique of official discourse surrounding the Protection from Harassment Act 1997 suggests that 1990s resonances did not reach the UK: however, an examination of the Hansard debates suggests this under-estimates the influence of feminist discourse. Halley’s discussion of “bad faith” helps to explain both the tendency of feminists to under-estimate their influence and why this matters. A commitment to an understanding of themselves as (...)
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  9.  17
    Volume8 No. 1 2000.Helen Reece, Divorcing Responsibly, Thérèse Murphy & Noel Whitty - 2000 - Feminist Legal Studies 8 (1):381-382.
    In this article I argue that Part II of the Family LawAct 1996 gives expression to a new form ofresponsibility. I begin by suggesting thatresponsible behaviour has shifted from prohibiting orrequiring particular actions: we now exhibitresponsibility by our attitude towards our actions. I then examine where this new conception ofresponsibility has come from. Through an examinationof the work of post-liberal theorists, principallyMichael Sandel, I argue that a changing view ofpersonhood within post-liberal theory has led to aquestioning of the possibility of (...)
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