Results for 'Helle ��rding'

697 found
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  1.  45
    Challenges in End-of-Life Decisions in the Intensive Care Unit: An Ethical Perspective. [REVIEW]Hanne Irene Jensen, Jette Ammentorp, Helle Johannessen & Helle Ørding - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):93-101.
    When making end-of-life decisions in intensive care units (ICUs), different staff groups have different roles in the decision-making process and may not always assess the situation in the same way. The aim of this study was to examine the challenges Danish nurses, intensivists, and primary physicians experience with end-of-life decisions in ICUs and how these challenges affect the decision-making process. Interviews with nurses, intensivists, and primary physicians were conducted, and data is discussed from an ethical perspective. All three groups found (...)
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  2. Hell and Vagueness.Theodore Sider - 2002 - Faith and Philosophy 19 (1):58--68.
    A certain conception of Hell is inconsistent with God's traditional attributes. My argument is novel in focusing on considerations involving vagueness. God is in charge of the selection procedure, so the selection procedure must be just; any just procedure will have borderline cases; but according to the traditional conception, the afterlife is binary and has no borderline cases.
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  3. Hell and the Problem of Evil.Andrei A. Buckareff & Allen Plug - 2013 - In Justin McBrayer & Daniel Howard-Snyder (eds.), Companion to the Problem of Evil. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 128-143.
    The case is discussed for the doctrine of hell as posing a unique problem of evil for adherents to the Abrahamic religions who endorse traditional theism. The problem is particularly acute for those who accept retributivist formulations of the doctrine of hell according to which hell is everlasting punishment for failing to satisfy some requirement. Alternatives to retributivism are discussed, including the unique difficulties that each one faces.
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  4. Hell and the God of Justice.Marilyn McCord Adams - 1975 - Religious Studies 11 (4):433 - 447.
    Christians have often held that on the day of judgment God will condemn some persons who have disobeyed him to a hell of everlasting torment and total unhappiness from which there is no hope of escape, as a punishment for their deeds up to that time. This is not the only way that hell has been or could be conceived of, but it has been the predominant conception in the Christian church throughout much of its history and it is the (...)
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  5.  40
    Hell, Heaven, Neither, or Both: The Afterlife and Sider’s Puzzle.Jeremiah Joaquin - 2019 - Sophia 58 (3):401-408.
    Theodore Sider’s puzzle in Hell and Vagueness has generated some interesting responses in the past few years. In this paper, I explore yet another possible solution out of the conundrum. This solution implies three ways of denying a binary conception of the afterlife. I argue that while these solutions might first seem tenable, they might still succumb to a Sideresque revenge puzzle.
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  6. Escaping Hell: Divine Motivation and the Problem of Hell.Andrei A. Buckareff & Allen Plug - 2005 - Religious Studies 41 (1):39-54.
    We argue that it is most rational for God, given God's character and policies, to adopt an open-door policy towards those in hell – making it possible for those in hell to escape. We argue that such a policy towards the residents of hell should issue from God's character and motivational states. In particular, God's parental love ought to motivate God to extend the provision for reconciliation with Him for an infinite amount of time.
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  7. Hell, Vagueness, and Justice: A Reply to Sider.Ted Poston - 2008 - Faith and Philosophy 25 (3):322-328.
    Ted Sider’s paper “Hell and Vagueness” challenges a certain conception of Hell by arguing that it is inconsistent with God’s justice. Sider’s inconsistencyargument works only when supplemented by additional premises. Key to Sider’s case is a premise that the properties upon which eternal destinies superveneare “a smear,” i.e., they are distributed continuously among individuals in the world. We question this premise and provide reasons to doubt it. The doubts come from two sources. The first is based on evidential considerations borrowed (...)
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  8.  58
    From Hell to Polarity: Aggressively Non-D-Linked Wh-Phrases as Polarity Items.Anastasia Giannakidou & Marcel den Dikken - manuscript
    Pesetsky’s (1987) ‘‘aggressively non-D-linked’’ wh-phrases (like who the hell; hereinafter, wh-the-hell phrases) exhibit a variety of syntactic and semantic peculiarities, including the fact that they cannot occur in situ and do not support nonecho readings when occurring in root multiple questions. While these are familiar from the literature (albeit less than fully understood), our focus will be on a previously unnoted property of wh-the-hell phrases: the fact that their distribution (in single wh-questions) matches that of polarity items (PIs). We lay (...)
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  9.  2
    Hell: The Logic of Damnation.Jerry Walls - 1992 - Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.
    Jerry L. Walls aims to demonstrate in his book Hell: The Logic of Damnation that some traditional views of hell are still defensible and can be believed with intellectual and moral integrity. Focusing on the issues from the standpoint of philosophical theology, Walls explores the doctrine of hell in relation to both the divine nature and human nature. He argues, with respect to the divine nature, that some traditional versions of the doctrine are compatible not only with God's omnipotence and (...)
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  10.  15
    Avīci Hell and Wújiān (無間) in the Cognitive Process: Observations on Some Technical Terms in the Jié Tuō Dào Lùn.Kyungrae Kim - 2016 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 44 (5):939-956.
    The text Jié tuō dào lùn, or Chinese translation of *Vimuttimagga mentions the Avīci Hell all of a sudden in the section on the cognitive process. The problematic phrase wújiān shēng Āpídìyù has been interpreted in different ways by several scholars. Japanese scholars tend to skip the phrase, or regard the term Āpídìyù as a typographic error. Given that we do not have an original text, however, the phrase needs to be understood as it is. In contrast, the English translation (...)
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  11.  63
    Hell Despite Vagueness: A Response to Sider.Matthew Konieczka - 2011 - Sophia 50 (1):221-232.
    Ted Sider argues that a binary afterlife is inconsistent with a proportionally just God because no just criterion for placing persons in such an afterlife exists. I provide a possible account whereby God can remain proportionally just and allow a binary afterlife. On my account, there is some maximum amount of people God can allow into Heaven without sacrificing some greater good. God gives to all people at least their due but chooses to allow some who do not deserve Heaven (...)
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  12.  15
    Three Tiers of CSR: An Instructive Means of Understanding and Guiding Contemporary Company Approaches to CSR?Helle K. Aggerholm & N. Leila Trapp - 2014 - Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (3):235-247.
    Heightened concern with global issues has led to shifts in corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs. To capture the distinct nature of this global focus, researchers have developed a three-generation CSR typology. In this paper, we first evaluate the usefulness of this typology for understanding corporate approaches to CSR by examining how several companies position themselves thematically in CEO introductions to sustainability reports. On the basis of this, we then evaluate the practical value of this typology for assisting those who work (...)
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  13.  96
    Hell and the Goodness of God.Wilko van Holten - 1999 - Religious Studies 35 (1):37-55.
    In this paper I contribute to the ongoing debate on hell in three ways: (1) I distinguish between three questions that play a key role in any discussion of the doctrine of hell; (2) I argue positively for the need of a doctrine of hell for Christian theism; (3) after evaluating several theological positions, I argue that the doctrine of hell should be construed as intrinsically bound up with the Christian conviction that God is love and wants to live with (...)
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  14.  69
    A Hell of a Choice: Reply to Talbott.Jerry L. Walls - 2004 - Religious Studies 40 (2):203-216.
    In this article I respond to Thomas Talbott's criticisms of the view of hell I have defended. In particular, I argue that coherent sense can be made of the choice to be eternally separated from God. Moreover, Talbott does not successfully show how God can save everyone without overriding their freedom. Finally, I argue that there is no significant sense in which sinners defeat God or sin with impunity on the view I have defended. Talbott's case that universalism necessarily follows (...)
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  15.  71
    Hell, Justice, and Freedom.Charles Seymour - 1998 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 43 (2):69-86.
  16. Dante's Hell, Aquinas's Moral Theory, and the Love of God.Eleonore Stump - 1986 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):181-198.
    ‘Abandon all hope, ye who enter here’ is, as we all recognize, the inscription over the gate of Dante's hell; but we perhaps forget what precedes that memorable line. Hell, the inscription says, was built by divine power, by the highest wisdom, and by primordial love. Those of us who remember Dante's vivid picture of Farinata in the perpetually burning tombs or Ulysses in the unending and yet unconsuming flames may be able to credit Dante's idea that Hell was constructed (...)
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  17.  25
    “Go to Hell Fucking Faggots, May You Die!” Framing the LGBT Subject in Online Comments.Fabienne Baider - 2018 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 14 (1):69-92.
    This paper reports on a manual monitoring of online representations of LGBT persons in the Republic of Cyprus for the period April 2015–February 2016. The article contextualizes the prevalence of “hate speech” in online Greek Cypriot comments against LGBT individuals, and, more generally, against non-heterosexuals. Adopting a Foucauldian position vis-à-vis the social and discursive construction of sexuality, we outline, first, the socio-historical context with a focus on LGBT rights in the Republic of Cyprus and the nationalistic project construing sexualities. We (...)
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  18.  83
    The Injustice of Hell.S. Kershnar - 2005 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 58 (2):103-123.
    This essay aims to establish two theses. First, hell is unjust. Second, God ought not (or perhaps cannot) impose hell on human beings. In support of these theses, Stephen Kershnar argues that human beings do not deserve hell because they either cannot cause an infinite amount of harm or are not responsible for doing so. Also, since humans don’t have infinitely bad characters, hell can’t be deserved on the basis of character. Since humans don’t deserve hell, God may not (or (...)
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  19.  58
    Hierocles and the Stoic Theory of Blending.Reier Helle - 2018 - Phronesis 63 (1):87-116.
    _ Source: _Volume 63, Issue 1, pp 87 - 116 In Stoic physics, blending is the relation between active pneuma and passive matter; natural bodies from rocks and logs to plants, animals and the cosmos itself are blends of pneuma and matter. Blending structures the Stoic cosmos. I develop a new interpretation of the Stoic theory of blending, based on passages from Hierocles. The theory of blending, I argue, has been misunderstood. Hierocles allows us to see in detail how the (...)
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  20. On the Problem of Hell.James Cain - 2002 - Religious Studies 38 (3):355-362.
    There is a conception of hell that holds that God punishes some people in a way that brings about endless suffering and unhappiness. An objection to this view holds that such punishment could not be just since it punishes finite sins with infinite suffering. In answer to this objection, it is shown that endless suffering, even intense suffering, is consistent with the suffering being finite. Another objection holds that such punishment is contrary to God's love. A possible response to this (...)
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  21.  12
    Modernity and the Holocaust, or, Listening to Eurydice.Julia Hell - 2010 - Theory, Culture and Society 27 (6):125-154.
    In this article, I offer a literary-critical reading of Modernity and the Holocaust, arguing that Bauman’s non-Hobbesian ethics is linked to a form of Orphic authorship. I contextualize this reading with a study of three literary authors: W.G. Sebald, Peter Weiss and Janina Bauman, and their respective versions of this post-Holocaust authorship. At stake is the drama of the forbidden gaze, the moment when Orpheus turns to look at Eurydice, killing her a second time. Using Levinas’ ethics and his scenario (...)
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  22.  3
    Machiavelli in Hell.Sebastian De Grazia - 1989 - Princeton University Press.
  23.  92
    The Problem of Hell.Jonathan L. Kvanvig - 1993 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This work develops an understanding of hell that is common to a broad variety of religious perspectives, and argues that the usual understandings of hell are incapable of solving the problem of hell. Kvanvig develops a philosophical account of hell which does not depend on a retributive model and argues that it is adequate on both philosophical and theological grounds.
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  24. The Problem of Hell: A Problem of Evil for Christians.Marilyn McCord Adams - 1993 - In Eleonore Stump & Norman Kretzmann (eds.), Reasoned Faith: Essays in Philosophical Theology in Honor of Norman Kretzmann. Cornell University Press.
     
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  25.  19
    Hell and Hope for Salvation.Germain Grisez & Peter F. Ryan - 2014 - New Blackfriars 95 (1059):606-615.
  26.  22
    Universalism, Hell, and the Fate of the Ignorant.Stephen T. Davis - 1990 - Modern Theology 6 (2):173-186.
  27.  7
    Cognitive Control Ability Mediates Prediction Costs in Monolinguals and Bilinguals.Megan Zirnstein, Janet G. van Hell & Judith F. Kroll - 2018 - Cognition 176:87-106.
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  28.  29
    A Hell of a Dilemma: Rejoinder to Talbott.Jerry L. Walls - 2004 - Religious Studies 40 (2):225-227.
    In this brief rejoinder to Talbott's reply, I argue that his clarifications pose a dilemma for him: he must either modify his account of unbearable misery, or give up his claim that all sinners must reach a point where they can resist God no farther. (Published Online April 21 2004).
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  29.  67
    Rights and Parliamentarism.Stig Kanger & Helle Kanger - 1966 - Theoria 32 (2):85-115.
  30.  20
    Hell and the Private Language Argument: Sartre and Wittgenstein on Self-Consciousness, the Body, and Others.Kathleen Wider - 1987 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 18 (2):120-132.
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  31.  86
    On Choosing Hell.Charles Seymour - 1997 - Religious Studies 33 (3):249-266.
    Most contemporary philosophers who defend the compatibility of hell with the divine goodness do so by arguing that the damned freely choose hell. Thomas Talbott denies that such a choice is possible, on the grounds that God in his goodness would remove any 'ignorance, deception, or bondage to desire' which would motivate a person to choose eternal misery. My strategy is to turn the tables on Talbott and ask why God would not remove the motives we have for any sin (...)
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  32.  5
    The Marriage of Heaven and Hell.William Blake - 1975 - American Chemical Society.
    The Marriage of Heaven and Hell represents Blake's first full-scale attempt to present his philosophic message. In it he expresses his extreme humanist views through a system in which Angels and Devils change places, Good becomes Evil, Heaven is Hell. The 27 colour plates are the work of Blake himself, with commentary and introduction by Sir Geoffrey Keynes.
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  33.  6
    To Hell with Culture.Herbert Read - 1965 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 24 (1):130-131.
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  34.  5
    Literary Semiotics and Cognitive Semantics.Helle M. Davidsen - 2007 - Semiotica 2007 (165):337-349.
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  35.  68
    Mad as Hell or Scared Stiff? The Effects of Value Conflict and Emotions on Potential Whistle-Blowers.Erika Henik - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (1):111-119.
    Existing whistle-blowing models rely on “cold” economic calculations and cost-benefit analyses to explain the judgments and actions of potential whistle-blowers. I argue that “hot” cognitions – value conflict and emotions – should be added to these models. I propose a model of the whistle-blowing decision process that highlights the reciprocal influence of “hot” and “cold” cognitions and advocate research that explores how value conflict and emotions inform reporting decisions. I draw on the cognitive appraisal approach to emotions and on the (...)
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  36.  25
    The Growth of Iq Among Estonian Schoolchildren From Ages 7 to 19.Helle Pullmann, Jüri Allik & Richard Lynn - 2004 - Journal of Biosocial Science 36 (6):735-740.
    The Standard Progressive Matrices test was standardized in Estonia on a representative sample of 4874 schoolchildren aged from 7 to 19 years. When the IQ of Estonian children was expressed in relation to British and Icelandic norms, both demonstrated a similar sigmoid relationship. The youngest Estonian group scored higher than the British and Icelandic norms: after first grade, the score fell below 100 and remained lower until age 12, and after that age it increased above the mean level of these (...)
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  37.  40
    When and Why Do People Avoid Unknown Probabilities in Decisions Under Uncertainty? Testing Some Predictions From Optimal Foraging Theory.Catrin Rode, Leda Cosmides, Wolfgang Hell & John Tooby - 1999 - Cognition 72 (3):269-304.
  38.  49
    Hell in Amsterdam: Reflections on Camus's The Fall.Philip L. Quinn - 1991 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 16 (1):89-103.
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  39.  35
    Avoiding Epistemic Hell: Levi on Pragmatism and Inconsistency.Erik J. Olsson - 2003 - Synthese 135 (1):119 - 140.
    Isaac Levi has claimed that our reliance on the testimony of others, and on the testimony of the senses, commonly produces inconsistency in our set of full beliefs. This happens if what is reported is inconsistent with what we believe to be the case. Drawing on a conception of the role of beliefs in inquiry going back to Dewey, Levi has maintained that the inconsistent belief corpus is a state of ``epistemic hell'': it is useless as a basis for inquiry (...)
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  40.  8
    Avoiding Epistemic Hell: Levi on Pragmatism and Inconsistency.Erik J. Olsson - 2003 - Synthese 135 (1):119-140.
    Isaac Levi has claimed that our reliance on the testimony of others, and on the testimony of the senses, commonly produces inconsistency in our set of full beliefs. This happens if what is reported is inconsistent with what we believe to be the case. Drawing on a conception of the role of beliefs in inquiry going back to Dewey, Levi has maintained that the inconsistent belief corpus is a state of "epistemic hell": it is useless as a basis for inquiry (...)
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  41.  11
    Hell on Earth : Hannah Arendt in the Face of Hitler.Jacob Rogozinski - 1993 - In Ari Hirvonen & Janne Porttikivi (eds.), Philosophy Today. Routledge. pp. 257-274.
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  42. The Problem of Hell.Jonathan L. Kvanvig - 1993 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 37 (2):118-120.
     
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  43. Escaping Hell but Not Heaven.Andrei A. Buckareff & Allen Plug - 2015 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 77 (3):247-253.
    Benjamin Matheson has recently critiqued the escapist account of hell that we have defended. In this paper we respond to Matheson. Building on some of our work in defense of escapism that Matheson does not discuss we show that the threat posed by Matheson’s critique is chimerical. We begin by summarizing our escapist theory of hell. Next, we summarize both Matheson’s central thesis and the main arguments offered in its defense. We then respond to those arguments.
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  44. Heaven and Hell.Michael Murray - 1999 - In Reason for the Hope Within. Eerdmans. pp. 289--317.
     
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  45.  4
    Formation of R&D Policy in a Small Country in a Changing World.Helle Martinson - 2001 - In Rein Vihalemm (ed.), Estonian Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 63--76.
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  46.  66
    Hell, Threshold Deontology, and Abortion.Stephen Kershnar - 2010 - Philosophia Christi 12 (1):79-101.
    In this paper, I argue that Threshold-Hell Christianity conflicts with the pro-life position on abortion. The specific type of Christianity is that which also accepts threshold deontology and the existence of hell. Threshold deontology is the view that ordinarily moral duties consist of non-consequentialist side-constraints on the pursuit of the good but that in some cases these side-constraints are overridden. My strategy is to establish that a person who brings about an abortion guarantees that the aborted individual goes to heaven (...)
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  47.  14
    Bi-Directional Evidence Linking Sentence Production and Comprehension: A Cross-Modality Structural Priming Study.Kaitlyn A. Litcofsky & Janet G. Van Hell - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  48. The Road to Hell: Intentions and Propositional Attitude Ascription.Jennifer M. Saul - 1999 - Mind and Language 14 (3):356–375.
  49.  5
    Rights and Parliamentarism.Stig Kanger & Helle Kanger - 1971 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (1):183-183.
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  50.  1
    A. Schutz and F. Kaufmann: Sociology Between Science and Interpretation.Ingeborg Katharina Helling - 1984 - Human Studies 7 (1-4):141-161.
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