Results for 'Helle H. Kristensen'

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  1. The Blind Hens' Challenge: Does It Undermine the View That Only Welfare Matters in Our Dealings with Animals?Peter Sandøe, Paul M. Hocking, Bjorn Förkman, Kirsty Haldane, Helle H. Kristensen & Clare Palmer - 2014 - Environmental Values 23 (6):727-742.
    Animal ethicists have recently debated the ethical questions raised by disenhancing animals to improve their welfare. Here, we focus on the particular case of breeding hens for commercial egg-laying systems to become blind, in order to benefit their welfare. Many people find breeding blind hens intuitively repellent, yet ‘welfare-only’ positions appear to be committed to endorsing this possibility if it produces welfare gains. We call this the ‘Blind Hens’ Challenge’. In this paper, we argue that there are both empirical and (...)
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  2.  89
    Argument is War... And War is Hell: Philosophy, Education, and Metaphors for Argumentation.Daniel H. Cohen - 1995 - Informal Logic 17 (2):177-188.
    The claim that argumentation has no proper role in either philosophy or education, and especially not in philosophical education, flies in the face of both conventional wisdom and traditional pedagogy. There is, however, something to be said for it because it is really only provocative against a certain philosophical backdrop. Our understanding of the concept "argument" is both reflected by and molded by the specific metaphor that argument-is-war, something with winners and losers, offensive and defensive moments, and an essentially adversarial (...)
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  3. Does Organic Farming Face Distinctive Livestock Welfare Issues.A. H. Fjelsted, M. Vaarst & E. Steen Kristensen - 2001 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14:275-299.
     
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  4.  14
    Knut Helle, Ed., The Cambridge History of Scandinavia, 1: Prehistory to 1520. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Pp. Xx, 872 Plus 63 Black-and-White Plates; 7 Black-and-White Figures, Tables, and 15 Maps. $160. [REVIEW]Michael H. Gelting - 2006 - Speculum 81 (2):526-529.
  5.  16
    Nucleation of the Thermal F.C.C.→H.C.P. Transformation.A. W. Sleeswyk, J. N. Helle & A. P. Von Rosenstiel - 1964 - Philosophical Magazine 9 (101):891-896.
  6.  12
    Tinder Use and Romantic Relationship Formations: A Large-Scale Longitudinal Study.Eilin K. Erevik, Joakim H. Kristensen, Torbjørn Torsheim, Øystein Vedaa & Ståle Pallesen - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  7.  19
    H. Jerome Keisler. Theory of Models with Generalized Atomic Formulas. The Journal of Symbolic Logic, Vol. 25 No. 1 , Pp. 1–26. [REVIEW]Martin Helling - 1969 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 34 (4):651-651.
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  8. Review: H. Jerome Keisler, Unions of Relational Systems; Jan Mycielski, On Unions of Denumerable Models. [REVIEW]Martin Helling - 1968 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 33 (2):287-287.
  9.  15
    The Harrowing of Hell. [REVIEW]H. J. Rose - 1932 - The Classical Review 46 (5):230-231.
  10.  16
    Jerome Keisler H.. Unions of Relational Systems. Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 15 , Pp. 540–545.Mycielski Jan. On Unions of Denumerable Models. Algébra I Logika. Séminar, Vol. 4 No 2 , Pp. 57–58. [REVIEW]Martin Helling - 1968 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 33 (2):287-287.
  11.  4
    Bicycle Cinema: Machine Identity and the Moving Image.Lars Kristensen - 2017 - Thesis Eleven 138 (1):65-80.
    This paper examines the relationship between identities and the bicycle as portrayed in films. The analysis finds that taking the viewpoint of the bicycle emancipates the bicycle from being subjected to closure, as the constructionists would have it, and thus articulates the differences with which the bicycle can communicate to its rider. The paper examines the bicycle as depicted in three films: Premium Rush, A Sunday in Hell and Life on Earth. It engages with the concept of ‘interpretative flexibility’ and (...)
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  12.  8
    Handling the Inpatient's Hospital ‘Career’ - Are Nurses Laying the Groundwork for Healthy Meal and Nutritional Care Transitions?Line H. Krogh, Anne Marie Beck, Niels H. Kristensen & Mette W. Hansen - 2019 - Nursing Inquiry 26 (1):e12262.
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  13.  27
    Ethical Aspects of Clinical Decision-Making.I. Kollemorten, C. Strandberg, B. M. Thomsen, O. Wiberg, T. Windfeld-Schmidt, V. Binder, L. Elsborg, C. Hendriksen, E. Kristensen, J. R. Madsen, M. K. Rasmussen, L. Willumsen, H. R. Wulff & P. Riis - 1981 - Journal of Medical Ethics 7 (2):67-69.
    The aim of the present investigation was to describe and to classify significant ethical problems encountered by the members of the staff during the daily clinical work at a hospital medical department. A set of definitions was prepared for the purpose, including the definition of a 'significant ethical problem'. During a three month period 426 inpatients and 173 outpatients were admitted. Significant ethical problems were encountered during the management of 106 in-patients (25 per cent) and 9 out-patients (5 per cent). (...)
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  14. Über die Grenzen der exakten Erfassung der Qualität "hell".H. KÖnig - 1965 - Dialectica 19 (1):70.
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  15. Host Publication Information.Sverre Raffnsøe, Alain Beaulieu, Sam Binkley, Patricia Clough, Jens Erik Kristensen, Sven Opitz, Jyoti Puri, Alan Rosenberg, Marius T. Gudmand-Høyer & Ditte Vilstrup Holm - 2013 - Foucault Studies 15:1-3.
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  16.  43
    Concerning 'The Science of Art': Commentary on Ramachandran and Hirstein.E. H. Gombrich - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (8-9):8-9.
    To the historian of art, it is evident that the two authors’ notion of ‘art’ is of very recent date, and not shared by everybody. They claim: ‘The purpose of art, surely, is not merely to depict or represent reality -- for that can be accomplished very easily with a camera -- but to enhance, transcend, or even to distort reality’ . They do not explain how one could photograph Paradise or Hell, the Creation of the World, the Passion of (...)
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  17.  33
    Universalism and Autonomy: Towards a Comparative Defense of Universalism.Eric H. Reitan - 2001 - Faith and Philosophy 18 (2):222-240.
    In arecent article, Michael Murray critiques several versions of universalism-that is, the doctrine that in the end all persons are saved. Of particular interest to Murray is Thomas Talbott’s version of universalism (called SU1 by Murray), which puts forward a strategy for ensuring universal salvation that purports to preserve the autonomy of the creatures saved. Murray argues that, on the contrary, the approach put forward in SU1 is not autonomy-preserving at all. I argue that this approach preserves the autonomy of (...)
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  18.  8
    A Modern, Rational Jeremiad.David H. Smith - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (5):45-47.
    I have been a Daniel Callahan reader for over thirty years. My first published review was of Abortion: Law, Choice, and Morality. Callahan's latest book, The Five Horsemen of the Modern World: Climate, Food, Water, Disease, and Obesity, is a sustained and detailed explanation of a series of challenges facing humankind in this century. Callahan's prognosis is bleak, his analyses credible, and while hope is not lost, the moral of the story is that we had better get our act together (...)
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  19. Hell and Vagueness.Theodore Sider - 2002 - Faith and Philosophy 19 (1):58--68.
    A certain conception of Hell is inconsistent with God's traditional attributes. My argument is novel in focusing on considerations involving vagueness. God is in charge of the selection procedure, so the selection procedure must be just; any just procedure will have borderline cases; but according to the traditional conception, the afterlife is binary and has no borderline cases.
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  20. L'enfer est-il éternel?Bernard Sesboüé - 1999 - Recherches de Science Religieuse 87 (2):189-206.
    Commençant par rappeler les objections traditionnelles ou habituelles à l'Enfer de la part des meilleurs croyants , l'auteur évoque d'abord les raisons qui militent en faveur de l'Enfer, notamment dans les propos même de Jésus : opposition entre le bien et le mal, intransigeance à l'égard du mal, langage pédagogique des paraboles, propos qui paraissent surtout contradictoires. Une aporie surgissant de l'enseignement même de jésus, l'auteur examine quelques théories pour en sortir pour examiner ensuite les implications de la liberté créée (...)
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  21.  52
    The Poetry of Jeroen Mettes.Samuel Vriezen & Steve Pearce - 2012 - Continent 2 (1):22-28.
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 22–28. Jeroen Mettes burst onto the Dutch poetry scene twice. First, in 2005, when he became a strong presence on the nascent Dutch poetry blogosphere overnight as he embarked on his critical project Dichtersalfabet (Poet’s Alphabet). And again in 2011, when to great critical acclaim (and some bafflement) his complete writings were published – almost five years after his far too early death. 2005 was the year in which Dutch poetry blogging exploded. That year saw the foundation (...)
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  22. Hell and the Problem of Evil.Andrei A. Buckareff & Allen Plug - 2013 - In Justin McBrayer & Daniel Howard-Snyder (eds.), Companion to the Problem of Evil. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 128-143.
    The case is discussed for the doctrine of hell as posing a unique problem of evil for adherents to the Abrahamic religions who endorse traditional theism. The problem is particularly acute for those who accept retributivist formulations of the doctrine of hell according to which hell is everlasting punishment for failing to satisfy some requirement. Alternatives to retributivism are discussed, including the unique difficulties that each one faces.
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  23. Hell and the God of Justice.Marilyn McCord Adams - 1975 - Religious Studies 11 (4):433 - 447.
    Christians have often held that on the day of judgment God will condemn some persons who have disobeyed him to a hell of everlasting torment and total unhappiness from which there is no hope of escape, as a punishment for their deeds up to that time. This is not the only way that hell has been or could be conceived of, but it has been the predominant conception in the Christian church throughout much of its history and it is the (...)
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  24.  37
    Hell, Heaven, Neither, or Both: The Afterlife and Sider’s Puzzle.Jeremiah Joaquin - 2019 - Sophia 58 (3):401-408.
    Theodore Sider’s puzzle in Hell and Vagueness has generated some interesting responses in the past few years. In this paper, I explore yet another possible solution out of the conundrum. This solution implies three ways of denying a binary conception of the afterlife. I argue that while these solutions might first seem tenable, they might still succumb to a Sideresque revenge puzzle.
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  25.  28
    Liberalism: H. J. McCloskey.H. J. Mccloskey - 1974 - Philosophy 49 (187):13-32.
    Liberalism is commonly believed, especially by its exponents, to be opposed to interference by way of enforcing value judgments or concerning itself with the individual's morality. My concern is to show that this is not so and that liberalism is all the better for this. Many elements have contributed to liberal thought as we know it today, the major elements being the liberalism of which Locke is the most celebrated exponent, which is based upon a belief in natural, human rights; (...)
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  26. Escaping Hell: Divine Motivation and the Problem of Hell.Andrei A. Buckareff & Allen Plug - 2005 - Religious Studies 41 (1):39-54.
    We argue that it is most rational for God, given God's character and policies, to adopt an open-door policy towards those in hell – making it possible for those in hell to escape. We argue that such a policy towards the residents of hell should issue from God's character and motivational states. In particular, God's parental love ought to motivate God to extend the provision for reconciliation with Him for an infinite amount of time.
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  27. Hell, Vagueness, and Justice: A Reply to Sider.Ted Poston - 2008 - Faith and Philosophy 25 (3):322-328.
    Ted Sider’s paper “Hell and Vagueness” challenges a certain conception of Hell by arguing that it is inconsistent with God’s justice. Sider’s inconsistencyargument works only when supplemented by additional premises. Key to Sider’s case is a premise that the properties upon which eternal destinies superveneare “a smear,” i.e., they are distributed continuously among individuals in the world. We question this premise and provide reasons to doubt it. The doubts come from two sources. The first is based on evidential considerations borrowed (...)
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  28.  58
    From Hell to Polarity: Aggressively Non-D-Linked Wh-Phrases as Polarity Items.Anastasia Giannakidou & Marcel den Dikken - manuscript
    Pesetsky’s (1987) ‘‘aggressively non-D-linked’’ wh-phrases (like who the hell; hereinafter, wh-the-hell phrases) exhibit a variety of syntactic and semantic peculiarities, including the fact that they cannot occur in situ and do not support nonecho readings when occurring in root multiple questions. While these are familiar from the literature (albeit less than fully understood), our focus will be on a previously unnoted property of wh-the-hell phrases: the fact that their distribution (in single wh-questions) matches that of polarity items (PIs). We lay (...)
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  29.  2
    Hell: The Logic of Damnation.Jerry Walls - 1992 - Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.
    Jerry L. Walls aims to demonstrate in his book Hell: The Logic of Damnation that some traditional views of hell are still defensible and can be believed with intellectual and moral integrity. Focusing on the issues from the standpoint of philosophical theology, Walls explores the doctrine of hell in relation to both the divine nature and human nature. He argues, with respect to the divine nature, that some traditional versions of the doctrine are compatible not only with God's omnipotence and (...)
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  30.  91
    Global Bioethics: The Collapse of Consensus : Edited by H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr.H. Tristram Engelhardt (ed.) - 2006 - M & M Scrivener Press.
    This collection of essays, Global Bioethics: The Collapse of Consensus, deals with the issue of the repeated failure of attempts to derive a universal set of ...
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  31.  69
    A Hell of a Choice: Reply to Talbott.Jerry L. Walls - 2004 - Religious Studies 40 (2):203-216.
    In this article I respond to Thomas Talbott's criticisms of the view of hell I have defended. In particular, I argue that coherent sense can be made of the choice to be eternally separated from God. Moreover, Talbott does not successfully show how God can save everyone without overriding their freedom. Finally, I argue that there is no significant sense in which sinners defeat God or sin with impunity on the view I have defended. Talbott's case that universalism necessarily follows (...)
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  32.  13
    H. E. Armstrong and the Teaching of Science, 1880-1930.W. H. Brock - 1974 - British Journal of Educational Studies 22 (1):119-120.
  33.  15
    Avīci Hell and Wújiān (無間) in the Cognitive Process: Observations on Some Technical Terms in the Jié Tuō Dào Lùn.Kyungrae Kim - 2016 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 44 (5):939-956.
    The text Jié tuō dào lùn, or Chinese translation of *Vimuttimagga mentions the Avīci Hell all of a sudden in the section on the cognitive process. The problematic phrase wújiān shēng Āpídìyù has been interpreted in different ways by several scholars. Japanese scholars tend to skip the phrase, or regard the term Āpídìyù as a typographic error. Given that we do not have an original text, however, the phrase needs to be understood as it is. In contrast, the English translation (...)
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  34.  34
    J. H. Hexter, Neo-Whiggism And Early Stuart Historiography.William H. Dray - 1987 - History and Theory 26 (2):133-149.
    J. H. Hexter, an American historian of early seventeenth-century history, terms himself whiggish and claims whiggishness is returning after the misguided popularity of Marxism. The distinction "whiggish" is more elusive than his claim suggests, and the accuracy of its application to Hexter's claim is unclear. Three characteristics commonly assigned to whig interpretation by its critics can be seen as reflections of broader, unresolved historical issues. These are: attention to political and constitutional issues; a tendency to refer to the present in (...)
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  35.  27
    Response by H. H. Pattee to Jon Umerez’s Paper: “Where Does Pattee’s “How Does a Molecule Become a Message?” Belong in the History of Biosemiotics?”. [REVIEW]H. H. Pattee - 2009 - Biosemiotics 2 (3):291-302.
    Umerez’s analysis made me aware of the fundamental differences in the culture of physics and molecular biology and the culture of semiotics from which the new field of biosemiotics arose. These cultures also view histories differently. Considering the evolutionary span and the many hierarchical levels of organization that their models must cover, models at different levels will require different observables and different meanings for common words, like symbol, interpretation, and language. These models as well as their histories should be viewed (...)
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  36.  63
    Hell Despite Vagueness: A Response to Sider.Matthew Konieczka - 2011 - Sophia 50 (1):221-232.
    Ted Sider argues that a binary afterlife is inconsistent with a proportionally just God because no just criterion for placing persons in such an afterlife exists. I provide a possible account whereby God can remain proportionally just and allow a binary afterlife. On my account, there is some maximum amount of people God can allow into Heaven without sacrificing some greater good. God gives to all people at least their due but chooses to allow some who do not deserve Heaven (...)
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  37.  15
    Three Tiers of CSR: An Instructive Means of Understanding and Guiding Contemporary Company Approaches to CSR?Helle K. Aggerholm & N. Leila Trapp - 2014 - Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (3):235-247.
    Heightened concern with global issues has led to shifts in corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs. To capture the distinct nature of this global focus, researchers have developed a three-generation CSR typology. In this paper, we first evaluate the usefulness of this typology for understanding corporate approaches to CSR by examining how several companies position themselves thematically in CEO introductions to sustainability reports. On the basis of this, we then evaluate the practical value of this typology for assisting those who work (...)
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  38.  13
    William H. Bragg's Corpuscular Theory of X-Rays and Γ-Rays.Roger H. Stuewer - 1971 - British Journal for the History of Science 5 (3):258-281.
    The modern corpuscular theory of radiation was born in 1905 when Einstein advanced his light quantum hypothesis; and the steps by which Einstein's hypothesis, after years of profound scepticism, was finally and fully vindicated by Arthur Compton's 1922 scattering experiments constitutes one of the most stimulating chapters in the history of recent physics. To begin to appreciate the complexity of this chapter, however, it is only necessary to emphasize an elementary but very significant point, namely, that while Einstein based his (...)
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  39. WADDINGTON, C. H. - "The Ethical Animal". [REVIEW]C. H. Whiteley - 1962 - Mind 71:136.
  40.  95
    Hell and the Goodness of God.Wilko van Holten - 1999 - Religious Studies 35 (1):37-55.
    In this paper I contribute to the ongoing debate on hell in three ways: (1) I distinguish between three questions that play a key role in any discussion of the doctrine of hell; (2) I argue positively for the need of a doctrine of hell for Christian theism; (3) after evaluating several theological positions, I argue that the doctrine of hell should be construed as intrinsically bound up with the Christian conviction that God is love and wants to live with (...)
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  41.  28
    II. Human Flourishing: H. MEYNELL.H. Meynell - 1969 - Religious Studies 5 (2):147-154.
    Miss G. E. M. Anscombe has said that, in order for progress to be made in ethics, we must have some determinate idea of ‘human flourishing.’ I want to cite in what follows the work of a number of writers in the psychiatric field who seem to me to throw light on just what it is for a human individual to flourish, for a human community to flourish, and for a human individual to flourish in relation to or in spite (...)
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  42.  71
    Hell, Justice, and Freedom.Charles Seymour - 1998 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 43 (2):69-86.
  43.  74
    Belief ‘In’ and Belief ‘That’1: H. H. PRICE.H. H. Price - 1965 - Religious Studies 1 (1):5-27.
    Epistemologists have not usually had much to say about believing ‘in’, though ever since Plato's time they have been interested in believing ‘that’. Students of religion, on the other hand, have been greatly concerned with belief ‘in’, and many of them, I think, would maintain that it is something quite different from belief ‘that’. Surely belief ‘in’ is an attitude to a person, whether human or divine, while belief ‘that’ is just an attitude to a proposition? Could any difference be (...)
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  44.  23
    Micro-Composition1: D. H. Mellor.D. H. Mellor - 2008 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 62:65-80.
    Entities of many kinds, not just material things, have been credited with parts. Armstrong, for example, has taken propositions and properties to be parts of their conjunctions, sets to be parts of sets that include them, and geographical regions and events to be parts of regions and events that contain them. The justification for bringing all these diverse relations under a single ‘part–whole’ concept is that they share all or most of the formal features articulated in mereology. But the concept (...)
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  45.  18
    Hell and Hope for Salvation.Germain Grisez & Peter F. Ryan - 2014 - New Blackfriars 95 (1059):606-615.
  46.  21
    T. H. Huxley on Education.Cyril Bibby & T. H. Huxley - 1972 - British Journal of Educational Studies 20 (3):352-353.
  47.  21
    Review of H. Joas, Die Kreativität des Handelns. [REVIEW]H. G. Callaway - 1995 - Philasophical Quarterly (Scotland) 45 (179):247-249.
  48.  26
    Max H. Fisch: Rigorous Humanist.Edward H. Madden - 1986 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 22 (4):375 - 396.
  49. Towards a Systemic Research Methodology in Agriculture: Rethinking the Role of Values in Science.Hugo Fjelsted Alrøe & Erik Steen Kristensen - 2002 - Agriculture and Human Values 19 (1):3-23.
    The recent drastic development of agriculture, together with the growing societal interest in agricultural practices and their consequences, pose a challenge to agricultural science. There is a need for rethinking the general methodology of agricultural research. This paper takes some steps towards developing a systemic research methodology that can meet this challenge – a general self-reflexive methodology that forms a basis for doing holistic or (with a better term) wholeness-oriented research and provides appropriate criteria of scientific quality.From a philosophy of (...)
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  50. Dante's Hell, Aquinas's Moral Theory, and the Love of God.Eleonore Stump - 1986 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):181-198.
    ‘Abandon all hope, ye who enter here’ is, as we all recognize, the inscription over the gate of Dante's hell; but we perhaps forget what precedes that memorable line. Hell, the inscription says, was built by divine power, by the highest wisdom, and by primordial love. Those of us who remember Dante's vivid picture of Farinata in the perpetually burning tombs or Ulysses in the unending and yet unconsuming flames may be able to credit Dante's idea that Hell was constructed (...)
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