18 found
Order:
  1. The Brute Within: Appetitive Desire in Plato and Aristotle.Hendrik Lorenz - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Hendrik Lorenz presents a comprehensive study of Plato's and Aristotle's conceptions of non-rational desire. They see this as something that humans share with animals, and which aims primarily at the pleasures of food, drink, and sex. Lorenz explores the cognitive resources that both philosophers make available for the explanation of such desires, and what they take rationality to add to the motivational structure of human beings. In doing so, he finds conceptions of the mind that are coherent and deeply integrated (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   59 citations  
  2. The Assimilation of Sense to Sense-Object in Aristotle.Hendrik Lorenz - 2007 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 33:179-220.
  3. Virtue of Character in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.Hendrik Lorenz - 2009 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 37:177 - 212.
  4. Ancient Theories of Soul.Hendrik Lorenz - unknown - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Ancient philosophical theories of soul are in many respects sensitive to ways of speaking and thinking about the soul psuchê] that are not specifically philosophical or theoretical. We therefore begin with what the word ‘soul’ meant to speakers of Classical Greek, and what it would have been natural to think about and associate with the soul. We then turn to various Presocratic thinkers, and to the philosophical theories that are our primary concern, those of Plato (first in the Phaedo, then (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  5.  46
    Natural Goals of Actions in Aristotle.Hendrik Lorenz - 2015 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (4):583--600.
    ABSTRACT:I argue that there are, according to Aristotle, two importantly different kinds of goals or ends in the domain of human agency and that one of these two kinds has been frequently, though not universally, overlooked. Apart from psychological goals, goals that agents adopt as their purposes, there are also, I submit, goals that actions have by being the kinds of actions they are and, in some cases, by occurring in the circumstances in which they do. These latter goals belong (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6.  51
    Aristotle’s Empiricist Theory of Doxastic Knowledge.Hendrik Lorenz & Benjamin Morison - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (4):431-464.
    Aristotle takes practical wisdom and arts or crafts to be forms of knowledge which, we argue, can usefully be thought of as ‘empiricist’. This empiricism has two key features: knowledge does not rest on grasping unobservable natures or essences; and knowledge does not rest on grasping logical relations that hold among propositions. Instead, knowledge rests on observation, memory, experience and everyday uses of reason. While Aristotle’s conception of theoretical knowledge does require grasping unobservable essences and logical relations that hold among (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Virtue of Character in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.Hendrik Lorenz - 2009 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Volume 37. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  8. Desire and Reason in Plato's Republic.Hendrik Lorenz - 2004 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 27:83-116.
  9. The Analysis of the Soul in Plato's Republic.Hendrik Lorenz - 2006 - In Gerasimos Xenophon Santas (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Plato's Republic. Blackwell. pp. 146--165.
  10. Nicomachean Ethics VII. 4 : Plain and Qualified Akrasia.Hendrik Lorenz - 2009 - In Carlo Natali (ed.), Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11. Posidonius on the Nature and Treatment of the Emotions.Hendrik Lorenz - 2011 - In James V. Allen, Eyjólfur Kjalar Emilsson, Wolfgang-Rainer Mann & Benjamin Morison (eds.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy: Essays in Memory of Michael Frede, vol. 40. NY: Oxford University Press. pp. 189-211.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Desire and Reason in Plato's Republic.Hendrik Lorenz - 2004 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Xxvii: Winter 2004. Clarendon Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13.  33
    Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2008.05.41.Hendrik Lorenz - manuscript
    The Brute Within proceeds in three parts, the first two (amounting to half the book) on Plato and the third on Aristotle. Each part, as well as the book itself, has an Introduction in which Lorenz helpfully signals what he is up to; the author frequently (though sometimes repetitively) summarizes his argument as he goes along. There is no mistaking his central claims: that in both Plato and Aristotle there are three types of desires--reason, spirit and appetite--such that the last (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  12
    Knowledge, and Inquiry in Aristotle.Hendrik Lorenz - 2013 - In Frisbee Sheffield & James Warren (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 290.
  15. Non-Rational Practical Cognition in Plato and Aristotle.Hendrik Lorenz - 2000
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  34
    Philosophiehistorie als Rezeptionsgeschichte: Die Reaktion auf Aristoteles' De Anima-Noetik: Der fruhe Hellenismus (review).Hendrik Lorenz - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):122-123.
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Pavel Gregorić, Aristotle on the Common Sense.Hendrik Lorenz - 2009 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science:225-231.
  18.  66
    Plato’s Utopia Recast—His Later Ethics and Politics. [REVIEW]Hendrik Lorenz - 2004 - Philosophical Review 113 (4):560-566.
    Plato’s Utopia Recast is an exceptionally rich and ambitious book. Its central text is the Laws, and it inherits from that dialogue a focus on ethical and political theory. It also, however, operates on the assumption that the Laws is interconnected, more or less systematically, with other later dialogues. The Republic contains its own metaphysical, epistemological, and psychological theories, which provide support and philosophical context to its theory of justice. The Laws, by contrast, is devoted almost exclusively to ethics and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark