13 found
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  1.  24
    The Relevance Effect and Conditionals.Niels Skovgaard-Olsen, Henrik Singmann & Karl Christoph Klauer - 2016 - Cognition 150:26-36.
    More than a decade of research has found strong evidence for P(if A, then C) = P(C|A) (“the Equation”). We argue, however, that this hypothesis provides an overly simplified picture due to its inability to account for relevance. We manipulated relevance in the evaluation of the probability and acceptability of indicative conditionals and found that relevance moderates the effect of P(C|A). This corroborates the Default and Penalty Hypothesis put forward in this paper. Finally, the probability and acceptability of concessive conditionals (...)
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  2. Relevance and Reason Relations.Niels Skovgaard‐Olsen, Henrik Singmann & Karl Christoph Klauer - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S5):1202-1215.
    This paper examines precursors and consequents of perceived relevance of a proposition A for a proposition C. In Experiment 1, we test Spohn's assumption that ∆P = P − P is a good predictor of ratings of perceived relevance and reason relations, and we examine whether it is a better predictor than the difference measure − P). In Experiment 2, we examine the effects of relevance on probabilistic coherence in Cruz, Baratgin, Oaksford, and Over's uncertain “and-to-if” inferences. The results suggest (...)
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  3.  7
    New Normative Standards of Conditional Reasoning and the Dual-Source Model.Henrik Singmann, Karl Christoph Klauer & David Over - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  4.  19
    Conditionals and Inferential Connections: Toward a New Semantics.Igor Douven, Shira Elqayam, Henrik Singmann & Janneke van Wijnbergen-Huitink - forthcoming - Thinking and Reasoning:1-41.
    In previous published research, we investigated experimentally what role the presence and strength of an inferential connection between a conditional’s antecedent and consequent plays in how people process that conditional. Our analysis showed the strength of that connection to be strongly predictive of whether participants evaluated the conditional as true, false, or neither true nor false. In this article, we re-analyse the data from our previous research, now focussing on the semantics of conditionals rather than on how they are processed. (...)
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  5.  56
    Deductive and Inductive Conditional Inferences: Two Modes of Reasoning.Henrik Singmann & Karl Christoph Klauer - 2011 - Thinking and Reasoning 17 (3):247 - 281.
    A number of single- and dual-process theories provide competing explanations as to how reasoners evaluate conditional arguments. Some of these theories are typically linked to different instructions?namely deductive and inductive instructions. To assess whether responses under both instructions can be explained by a single process, or if they reflect two modes of conditional reasoning, we re-analysed four experiments that used both deductive and inductive instructions for conditional inference tasks. Our re-analysis provided evidence consistent with a single process. In two new (...)
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  6.  35
    A New Angle on the Knobe Effect: Intentionality Correlates with Blame, Not with Praise.Frank Hindriks, Igor Douven & Henrik Singmann - 2016 - Mind and Language 31 (2):204-220.
    In a celebrated experiment, Joshua Knobe showed that people are much more prone to attribute intentionality to an agent for a side effect of a given act when that side effect is harmful than when it is beneficial. This asymmetry has become known as ‘the Knobe Effect’. According to Knobe's Moral Valence Explanation, bad effects trigger the attributions of intentionality, whereas good effects do not. Many others believe that the Knobe Effect is best explained in terms of the high amount (...)
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  7. Conditionals and Inferential Connections: A Hypothetical Inferential Theory.Igor Douven, Shira Elqayam, Henrik Singmann & Janneke van Wijngaarden-Huitink - 2018 - Cognitive Psychology 101:50-81.
  8.  3
    Turn Around to Have a Look? Spatial Referencing in Dorsal Vs. Frontal Settings in Cross-Linguistic Comparison.Sieghard Beller, Henrik Singmann, Lisa Hüther & Andrea Bender - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  9.  8
    On the Measurement of Criterion Noise in Signal Detection Theory: The Case of Recognition Memory.David Kellen, Karl Christoph Klauer & Henrik Singmann - 2012 - Psychological Review 119 (3):457-479.
  10.  10
    On the Measurement of Criterion Noise in Signal Detection Theory: Reply to Benjamin.David Kellen, Karl Christoph Klauer & Henrik Singmann - 2013 - Psychological Review 120 (3):727-730.
  11.  6
    Two Distinct Mechanisms of Selection in Working Memory: Additive Last-Item and Retro-Cue Benefits.Marcel Niklaus, Henrik Singmann & Klaus Oberauer - 2019 - Cognition 183:282-302.
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  12.  12
    Corrigendum to “The Relevance Effect and Conditionals” [Cognition 150 26–36].Niels Skovgaard-Olsen, Henrik Singmann & Karl Christoph Klauer - 2018 - Cognition 170:338.
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  13. A New Probabilistic Explanation of the Modus Ponens–Modus Tollens Asymmetry.Stephan Hartmann, Benjamin Eva & Henrik Singmann - 2019 - In CogSci 2019 Proceedings. Montreal, Québec, Kanada: pp. 289–294.
    A consistent finding in research on conditional reasoning is that individuals are more likely to endorse the valid modus ponens (MP) inference than the equally valid modus tollens (MT) inference. This pattern holds for both abstract task and probabilistic task. The existing explanation for this phenomenon within a Bayesian framework (e.g., Oaksford & Chater, 2008) accounts for this asymmetry by assuming separate probability distributions for both MP and MT. We propose a novel explanation within a computational-level Bayesian account of reasoning (...)
     
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