Results for 'Henry (of Ghent)'

172 found
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  1.  12
    Henry of Ghent: Proceedings of the International Colloquium on the Occasion of the 700th Anniversary of His Death (1293). [REVIEW]Henry (of Ghent), W. Vanhamel & Belgique) Centre de Wulf-Mansion (Louvain-la-Neuve (eds.) - 1996 - Leuven Univ Pr.
    TRANSCENDENTAL THOUGHT IN HENRY OF GHENT JAN A. AERTSEN (K6LN) 1. Introduction: Henry as a "transcendental" philosopher (J. Paulus) "If it is proper to an ...
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  2. Henry of Ghent's Summa: The Questions on God's Existence and Essence, (Articles 21-24).Henry (of Ghent) - 2005 - Peeters.
    This volume offers a translation with introduction and notes of Henry of Ghent's questions on the being and essence of God from his Summa of Ordinary Questions (Summa quaestionum ordinarium). These questions form the heart of Henry's philosophy of God, especially his "new way" of proving the existence of God and his claim that God is the first object known by the human intellect.
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  3.  1
    Henry of Ghent's Summa of Ordinary Questions: Article One: On the Possibility of Knowing.Henricus (Gandavensis), Henry (of Ghent) & Henry of Ghent - 2008 - St. Augustine's Press.
  4. Henry of Ghent on Real Relations and the Trinity: The Case for Numerical Sameness Without Identity.Scott M. Williams - 2012 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 79 (1):109-148.
    I argue that there is a hitherto unrecognized connection between Henry of Ghent’s general theory of real relations and his Trinitarian theology, namely the notion of numerical sameness without identity. A real relation (relatio) is numerically the same thing (res) as its absolute (non-relative) foundation, without being identical to its foundation. This not only holds for creaturely real relations but also for the divine persons’ distinguishing real relations. A divine person who is constituted by a real relation (relatio) (...)
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  5.  75
    Henry of Ghent on the Reality of Non-Existing Possibles – Revisited.Richard Cross - 2010 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 92 (2):115-132.
    According to a well-known interpretation, Henry of Ghent holds that possible but non-existent essences – items merely with what Henry labels ‘ esse essentiae ’ – have some reality external to the divine mind, but short of actual existence ( esse existentiae ). I argue that this reading of Henry is mistaken. Furthermore, Henry identifies any essence, considered independently of its existence as a universal concept or as instantiated in a particular as an item that (...)
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  6.  18
    Henry of Ghent's Voluntarist Account of Weakness of Will.Tobias Hoffmann - 2008 - In Weakness of Will from Plato to the Present. Catholic University of America Press.
    According to Henry of Ghent, akrasia (incontinence or weakness of will) does not presuppose, but rather produces a cognitive defect. By tracing akratic actions and other evil actions to a corruption in the will rather than to a cognitive defect, Henry wants to safeguard their freedom. Though the will is able to reject what the intellect judges as best here and now, strength and freedom of the will increase to the degree that one adheres more firmly to (...)
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  7. Henry of Ghent and Duns Scotus on the Knowledge of Being.Steven P. Marrone - 1988 - Speculum 63 (1):22-57.
    The idea of a special connection between the thought of John Duns Scotus and that of his forebear, Henry of Ghent, goes back to the time of Duns himself, and in the modern scholarly world it is as old as the critical study of medieval philosophy. Moreover in the last four decades there has been a proliferation of articles claiming that one cannot understand Duns until one has mastered the work of Henry. Nowhere has the connection between (...)
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  8.  48
    Henry of Ghent and the Twilight of Divine Illumination.Robert Pasnau - 1995 - Review of Metaphysics 49 (1):49 - 75.
    The first doctrine Peckham mentions as being under attack is of undoubtedly the TDI, according to which human beings are illuminated by "the unchangeable light" so as to attain the "eternal rules." This language of light and illumination is of course most closely associated with Augustine, but it permeates the entire Christian medieval tradition. Until Aquinas's time the TDI had played a prominent role in all the most influential medieval theories of knowledge, including those of Anselm, Albert the Great, Roger (...)
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  9.  7
    Henry of Ghent.Pasquale Porro - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  10.  14
    Henry of Ghent on the Reality of Non-Existing Possibles – Revisited.Richard Cross - 2010 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 92 (2):115-132.
  11.  25
    Henry of Ghent and John Duns Scotus on Skepticism and the Possibility of Naturally Acquired Knowledge.Martin Pickavé - 2010 - In Henrik Lagerlund (ed.), Rethinking the History of Skepticism: The Missing Medieval Background. Brill. pp. 103--61.
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  12. Giles of Rome, Henry of Ghent, and Godfrey of Fontaines on Whether to See God Is to Love Him.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2013 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 80:57-76.
    Although Giles of Rome, Henry of Ghent, and Godfrey of Fontaines disagree with each other profoundly over the relationship between the intellect and the will, they all think that someone who sees God must also love him in the ordinary course of events. However, Godfrey rejects a central thesis argued for by both Henry and Giles, namely that by God’s absolute power there could be such vision without love. The debate is not about the ability to freely (...)
     
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  13.  20
    Henry of Ghent's Teaching on Modes and its Influence in the Fourteenth Century.Isabel Iribarren - 2002 - Mediaeval Studies 64 (1):111-129.
  14.  22
    Henry of Ghent on Internal Sensation.J. V. Brown - 1972 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 10 (1):15-28.
  15.  15
    Henry of Ghent.Jerome V. Brown - 1984 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 30:310-314.
  16.  75
    Henry of Ghent’s Argument for Divine Illumination Reconsidered.Patrick J. Connolly - 2015 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 89 (1):47-68.
    In this paper I offer a new approach to Henry of Ghent's argument for divine illumination. Normally, Henry is criticized for adhering to a theory of divine illumination and failing to accept rediscovered Aristotelian approaches to cognition and epistemology. I argue that these critiques are mistaken. On my view, Henry was a proponent of Aristotelianism. But Henry discovered a tension between Aristotle's views on teleology and the nature of knowledge, on the one hand, and various (...)
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  17.  87
    Henry of Ghent on Teaching Theology.Joke Spruyt - 2011 - Vivarium 49 (1-3):165-183.
    This paper aims to explain Henry of Ghent's views on what kind of language is appropriate in theology, and why. It concentrates on a number of questions of the Summa quaestionum ordinariarum , which are devoted to his take on how theologians should explain their discipline to students, and to the meaningfulness in general of theological language. The paper delves into the technical terms sensus and insinuare , and compares Henry's account with H.P. Grice's views on (speaker-)meaning (...)
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  18.  21
    Henry of Ghent on Divine Illumination.Markus L. Führer - 1998 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 3 (1):69-85.
    This essay examines Henry of Ghent's reaction to the Thomistic criticism of the Au-gustinian theory of divine illumination. By grounding epistemology in the psychology of Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas made divine illumination appear to be an unwieldy theory incorrect in its basic assumptions. Even though Henry reworked the Augustinian theory, he did not completely reject the Aristotelian-Thomistic epistemology. Unlike so many of his predecessors, Henry did not attempt to avoid difficult questions raised by the fallibility of sense (...)
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  19.  1
    A Companion to Henry of Ghent.Gordon Anthony Wilson (ed.) - 2010 - Brill.
    The volume addresses the historical context of Henry, e.g. his writings and his participation in the events of 1277; examines Henry’s theology, metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics; and studies Henry’s influence on John Duns Scotus and Pico della Mirandola.
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  20. Henry of Ghent's Influence on John Duns Scotus's Metaphysics.Tobias Hoffmann - 2011 - In Gordon A. Wilson (ed.), The Brill Companion to Henry of Ghent. Brill.
    This chapter emphasizes Duns Scotus’s indebtedness to Henry of Ghent with respect to the major themes of his metaphysics: his univocal notion of being, his view of being qua being as the subject of metaphysics, his metaphysical proof of God's existence, and his notion of being as a quidditative rather than existential notion.
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  21.  4
    Henry of Ghent: Metaphysics and the Trinity.Juan Carlos Flores - 2006 - Leuven University Press.
    His rich and multifaceted thought influenced many different traditions; he has been seen as an eclectic. This book elucidates Henry of Ghent's philosophical and theological system with special reference to his Trinitarian writings.
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  22.  11
    Henry of Ghent and the Transformation of Scholastic Thought: Studies in Memory of Jos Decorte.J. Decorte, Guy Guldentops & Carlos G. Steel (eds.) - 2003 - Leuven University Press.
    Throws light on the particular renewal of the theological and philosophical tradition which Henry of Ghent brought about and elucidates various aspects of his metaphysics and epistemology ethics, and theology.
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  23.  15
    Studies on Henry of Ghent - The Relevance of Henry's Concept of Relation.Jos Decorte - 1997 - Recherches de Philosophie 64 (1):230-238.
    This modest contribution has been occasioned by the publication of the Proceedings of an international colloquium held at the De Wulf-Mansion Centre of the Institute of Philosophy in commemoration of the seven-hundredth anniversary of the death of Henry of Ghent. This colloquium had a twofold purpose: «first to establish a status quaestionis of the different fields of research concerning Henry’s doctrines and the critical edition of his work and, second, to provide a forum for specialists to exchange (...)
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  24.  22
    Henry of Ghent’s “Summa of Ordinary Questions” Articles Six to Ten on Theology. Translated and Annotated by Roland J. Teske, SJ. [REVIEW]Franklin T. Harkins - 2013 - Augustinian Studies 44 (1):184-187.
  25.  9
    Studies on Henry of Ghent.Jos Decorte - 1997 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 64 (1):230-238.
    This modest contribution has been occasioned by the publication of the Proceedings of an international colloquium held at the De Wulf-Mansion Centre of the Institute of Philosophy in commemoration of the seven-hundredth anniversary of the death of Henry of Ghent. This colloquium had a twofold purpose: «first to establish a status quaestionis of the different fields of research concerning Henry’s doctrines and the critical edition of his work and, second, to provide a forum for specialists to exchange (...)
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  26.  9
    Henry of Ghent, Duns Scotus and Gianfrancesco Pico on Illumination.Charles B. Schmitt - 1963 - Mediaeval Studies 25 (1):231-258.
  27.  47
    Henry of Ghent’s Metaphysical Argument for the Existence of God.Roland J. Teske - 2005 - Modern Schoolman 83 (1):19-38.
  28.  37
    Henry of Ghent’s Criticism of the Aristotelian Arguments for God’s Existence.Roland J. Teske - 2005 - Modern Schoolman 82 (2):83-99.
  29. Quodlibetal Questions on Moral Problems.Henry (of Ghent), Henricus Gandavensis (O. S. M.) & Henry of Ghent - 2005 - Marquette University Press.
  30.  3
    Henry of Ghent on Divine Law, Natural Law and Human Law.Marialucrezia Leone - 2014 - In Guy Guldentops & Andreas Speer (eds.), Das Gesetz - the Law - la Loi. De Gruyter. pp. 383-398.
  31.  70
    Incarnation, Indwelling, and the Vision of God: Henry of Ghent and Some Franciscans.Richard Cross - 1999 - Franciscan Studies 57 (1):79 - 130.
    According to Henry of Ghent (d. 1293), it is impossible for the second person of the Trinity to assume into unity of person an irrational nature (e.g., a stone nature), or to assume a rational nature that does not enjoy the beatific vision. He argues that the assumption of a nature to a divine person entails both that the nature has the sort of powers that could exercise supernatural activities and that these powers are exercised. Henry’s Franciscan (...)
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  32. Henry of Ghent: "Opera Omnia Vols. V and XIV: Quodlibets I & X". [REVIEW]Stephen D. Dumont - 1984 - The Thomist 48 (3):470.
  33.  52
    The Reality of Nonexisting Possibles According to Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and Godfrey of Fontaines.John F. Wippel - 1981 - Review of Metaphysics 34 (4):729 - 758.
    IN THIS study I shall concentrate on three leading philosophical and theological thinkers of the thirteenth century: Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and Godfrey of Fontaines. Of these, Thomas Aquinas is surely the best known. But I have selected these three because their discussions of nonexisting possibles are sufficiently different from one another to illustrate some of the major solutions proposed to this issue at that time.
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  34.  31
    Divine Production in Late Medieval Trinitarian Theology: Henry of Ghent, Duns Scotus, and William Ockham.Jt Paasch - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    This book examines the central ideas that defined the debate about divine production in the Trinity in the late 13th and early 14th centuries, namely those of Henry of Ghent, John Duns Scotus, and William Ockham. Their discussions are significant for the history of trinitarian theology and the history of philosophy.
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  35.  7
    Henry of Ghent: Lectura Ordinaria Super Sacram Scripturam. [REVIEW]Jerome V. Brown - 1984 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 30:310-314.
  36.  6
    Henry of Ghent and the New Way to God (III).Anton C. Pegis - 1971 - Mediaeval Studies 33 (1):158-179.
  37.  13
    Henry of Ghent as Defender of Human Heroism.Raymond Macken - 1993 - Mediaevalia: Textos E Estudos 3:25-45.
  38.  4
    Henry of Ghent’s Summa, Articles 53–55: On the Divine Persons. Trans. Roland J. Teske, S.J. Milwaukee, WI: Marquette University Press, 2015. Pp. 351. ISBN: 978-0-87462-263-8. [REVIEW]Steven P. Marrone - 2018 - Speculum 93 (2):513-514.
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  39.  19
    Henry of Ghent and the Unity of Man.Armand Maurer - 1948 - Mediaeval Studies 10 (1):1-20.
  40.  34
    Henry of Ghent , Summa of Ordinary Questions: Articles Six to Ten on Theology , Trans. Roland J. Teske, SJ. Reviewed By.Stephen Boulter - 2013 - Philosophy in Review 33 (3):199–202.
  41. Henry of Ghent.Jerome V. Brown - 1984 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 30:310-314.
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  42.  45
    Change and Contradiction in Henry of Ghent.Simo Knuuttila - 2017 - Vivarium 55 (1-3):22-35.
    Hugh of Novocastro, Landolfo Caracciolo, John Baconthorpe, and some other medieval authors argued that there are real contradictions in nature. The background of this early fourteenth-century theory was the Aristotelian question of how to determine the instant of change between p and ~p. The argument was that these are simultaneously true at the temporal instant of change if it is an instant of changing. The author’s aim is to discuss the background of this view in Henry of Ghent’s (...)
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  43. Henry of Ghent.G. Graham White - 1996 - In T. Mautner (ed.), The Penguin Dictionary of Philosophy. Penguin Books.
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  44.  8
    Henry of Ghent's "Quodlibet I:" Initial Departures From Thomas Aquinas.Gordon A. Wilson - 1999 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 16 (2):167 - 180.
  45.  26
    Henry of Ghent's Quodlibet VII as a Source for Richard of Mediavilla's Quaestio Privilegii Papae Martini.Gordon Wilson - 1993 - Franciscan Studies 53 (1):97-120.
  46.  90
    John Duns Scotus on Henry of Ghent's Arguments for Divine Illumination: The Statement of the Case.Jerome V. Brown - 1976 - Vivarium 14 (2):94-113.
  47.  24
    Intellect and Knowing in Henry of Ghent (Continuation).J. V. Brown - 1975 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 37 (4):692 - 710.
  48. Quodlibetal Questions on Free Will.HENRY OF GHENT - 1993
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  49.  16
    Sensation in Henry of Ghent: A late mediaeval Aristotelian — Augustinian synthesis.Jerome V. Brown - 1971 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 53 (3):238.
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  50. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word.Scott M. Williams - 2010 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 77 (1):35-81.
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. If (...)
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