22 found
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  1.  44
    Innovation in Innovation: The Triple Helix of University-Industry-Government Relations.Henry Etzkowitz - 2003 - Social Science Information 42 (3):293-337.
    Innovation is increasingly based upon a “Triple Helix” of university-industry-government interactions. The increased importance of knowledge and the role of the university in incubation of technology-based firms has given it a more prominent place in the institutional firmament. The entrepreneurial university takes a proactive stance in putting knowledge to use and in broadening the input into the creation of academic knowledge. Thus it operates according to an interactive rather than a linear model of innovation. As firms raise their technological level, (...)
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  2. The Endless Transition: A “Triple Helix” of University–Industry–Government Relations.Henry Etzkowitz & Loet Leydesdorff - 1998 - Minerva 36 (3):203-208.
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  3.  54
    Entrepreneurial Scientists and Entrepreneurial Universities in American Academic Science.Henry Etzkowitz - 1983 - Minerva 21 (2-3):198-233.
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  4.  17
    Normative Change in Science and the Birth of the Triple Helix.Henry Etzkowitz - 2011 - Social Science Information 50 (3-4):549-568.
    A process of normative change in academic science makes spin-off entrepreneurship compatible with the advancement of knowledge. A parallel process of normative change in industrial science produces a creative tension between organizational and scientific goals that enhances the attainment of both objectives. The creation of hybrid organizations mediating between university–industry and university–government brings these institutional spheres into closer contiguity. The emergence of triadic interactions and ‘taking the role of the other’ among university–industry–government in the transition from an industrial to a (...)
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  5.  24
    The Role of Research Centres in the Collectivisation of Academic Science.Henry Etzkowitz & Carol Kemelgor - 1998 - Minerva 36 (3):271-288.
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  6.  25
    Anatomy of the Entrepreneurial University.Henry Etzkowitz - 2013 - Social Science Information 52 (3):486-511.
    This article analyzes the evolution of the entrepreneurial university from a narrow focus on capturing the commercializable results of the ‘meandering stream of basic research’ to a broader interest in firm formation and regional economic development. No longer limited to schools like MIT, specialized for that purpose, entrepreneurial aspirations have spread to the academic mainstream. Academic involvement in technology transfer, firm formation and regional development signifies the transition from a research to an entrepreneurial university as the academic ideal. As universities (...)
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  7.  16
    Individual Investigators and Their Research Groups.Henry Etzkowitz - 1992 - Minerva 30 (1):28-50.
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  8.  17
    Profiting From Knowledge: Organisational Innovations and the Evolution of Academic Norms. [REVIEW]Henry Etzkowitz & Lois S. Peters - 1991 - Minerva 29 (2):133-166.
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  9.  17
    Conflicts of Interest and Commitment in Academic Science in the United States.Henry Etzkowitz - 1996 - Minerva 34 (3):259-277.
    An interest in economic development has been extended to a set of research universities which since the late nineteenth century had been established, or had transformed themselves, to focus upon discipline-based fundamental investigations.21 The land-grant model was reformulated, from agricultural research and extension, to entrepreneurial transfers of science-based industrial technology by faculty members and university administrators.The norms of science, a set of values and incentives for proper institutional conduct,22 have been revised as an unintended consequence of the second revolution. This (...)
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  10.  22
    StartX and the ‘Paradox of Success’: Filling the Gap in Stanford’s Entrepreneurial Culture.Henry Etzkowitz - 2013 - Social Science Information 52 (4):605-627.
    Stanford University’s legendary success in technology transfer, based upon a relatively small group of serial faculty entrepreneurs, masked unrealized potential residing in the underutilized inventions of less entrepreneurially experienced faculty and students. An optimum academic entrepreneurship and technology-transfer regime matches various levels of inventor interest and involvement with appropriate organizational competence and support. The ‘Paradox of Success’ is that great organizational success in licensing, or other activities, may reduce the motivation to further advancement, in the Stanford case, introducing support structures (...)
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  11.  12
    Enterprises From Science: The Origins of Science-Based Regional Economic Development. [REVIEW]Henry Etzkowitz - 1993 - Minerva 31 (3):326-360.
  12.  20
    Knowledge as Property: The Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Debate Over Academic Patent Policy. [REVIEW]Henry Etzkowitz - 1994 - Minerva 32 (4):383-421.
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  13.  22
    Sociology and Praxis.Henry Etzkowitz - 1971 - Social Theory and Practice 1 (3):1-9.
  14.  14
    Gender Inequality in Science: A Universal Condition? [REVIEW]Henry Etzkowitz & Carol Kemelgor - 2001 - Minerva 39 (2):239-257.
  15.  48
    Responses to 'Pathologies of Science'.Sven Andersson, Elazar Barkan, Kenneth Caneva, Randall Collins, Stephen Downes, Henry Etzkowitz, Steve Fuller, David Gorman, Frederick Grinnell, David Hollinger, Anne Holmquest & Charles Willard - 1987 - Social Epistemology 1 (3):249-281.
  16.  11
    Counter-Cyclical Public Venture Capital: Debt-Funding as an Anti-Austerity Innovation Strategy.Alex Etzkowitz & Henry Etzkowitz - 2017 - Social Science Information 56 (3):477-495.
    This article outlines a counter-cyclical innovation strategy to achieve prosperity, derived from an innovative project, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. We identify an ‘innovation paradox’ in that the very point in the business cycle, when legislators are tempted to view austerity as a cure for economic downturns and to reduce innovation spend, is when an increase is most needed to create new industries and jobs and innovate out of recession or depression. It is both desirable and possible that policymakers (...)
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  17. From Conflict to Confluence of Interest : The Co-Evolution of Academic Entrepreneurship and Intellectual Property Rights.Henry Etzkowitz - 2010 - In Thomas H. Murray & Josephine Johnston (eds.), Trust and Integrity in Biomedical Research: The Case of Financial Conflicts of Interest. Johns Hopkins University Press.
  18. Profit From Knowledge: Organizational Innovations and Normative Change in American Universities.Henry Etzkowitz & Lois Peters - 1991 - Minerva 29 (2):133-166.
     
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  19.  12
    Silicon Valley at Risk? Sustainability of a Global Innovation Icon: An Introduction to the Special Issue.Henry Etzkowitz - 2013 - Social Science Information 52 (4):515-538.
    The increasing dependence of Silicon Valley on external sources of human capital and technological innovation is a potential Achilles’ heel if competitive regions achieve ‘stickiness’ and retain these assets. Silicon Valley developed in a successive triple helix format, each helix building upon and reinforcing the other. A single helix university development model morphed into a dual helix university–industry symbiotic relationship that became a triple helix university–industry–government format through the provision of government funding, sporadically in the pre-war and consistently in the (...)
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  20.  73
    Women in Science: A Fair Shake? [REVIEW]Henry Etzkowitz & Namrata Gupta - 2006 - Minerva 44 (2):185-199.
  21.  9
    Whither the University? The Novum Trivium and the Transition From Industrial to Knowledge Society.Henry Etzkowitz, Marina Ranga & James Dzisah - 2012 - Social Science Information 51 (2):143-164.
    Beyond the Bologna Process key objective of achieving a common structure of the European tertiary educational format is the fundamental issue of the changing content of higher education. The highly specialized curricula of the Industrial Society no longer fully meet the needs of an emerging Knowledge Society that requires citizens with entrepreneurial and inter-cultural capabilities to innovate and respond to change in an increasingly inter-connected world. In this article we propose an innovative approach to undergraduate education called the Novum Trivium, (...)
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  22.  42
    Overcoming Isolation: Women's Dilemmas in American Academic Science. [REVIEW]Carol Kemelgor & Henry Etzkowitz - 2001 - Minerva 39 (2):153-174.
    Science is an intensely social activity. Professional relationships are essential forscientific success and mentors areindispensable for professional growth. Despitethe scientific ethos of universalism andinclusion, American women scientists frequentlyexperience isolation and exclusion at some timeduring their academic career. By contrast,male scientists enjoy informal but crucialsocial networks. Female scientists developnecessary strategies and defences, but manyleave or achieve less success in science whendeprived of necessary interpersonalconnections. There is indication that changewithin departments is occurring, but this isdependent upon institutional leadership.
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