Results for 'Henry S. Bellisle'

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  1.  85
    David Leech: The Hammer of the Cartesians: Henry More’s Philosophy of Spirit and the Origins of Modern Atheism.John Henry - 2015 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 77 (3):267-271.
    Henry More (1614–1687), the most influential of the so-called Cambridge Platonists, and arguably the leading philosophically-inclined theologian in late seventeenth-century England, has come in for renewed attention lately. He was the subject of a detailed intellectual biography in 2003 by Robert Crocker, and in 2012 Jasper Reid published a philosophically penetrating and enlightening study of More’s metaphysics (Crocker 2003; Reid 2012). David Leech’s study of More’s idiosyncratic concept of immaterial spirit—and the role that it plays in his philosophy and (...)
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  2.  44
    A Cambridge Platonist's Materialism: Henry More and the Concept of Soul.John Henry - 1986 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 49:172-195.
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  3.  11
    Essay Review: Henry More and Newton's Gravity, Henry More: Magic, Religion and Experiment.J. Henry - 1993 - History of Science 31 (1):83-97.
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  4.  12
    Science in Defense of Liberal Religion: A Study of Henry More's Attempt to Link Seventeenth Century Religion with Science. [REVIEW]P. L. S. - 1934 - Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):82-83.
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  5.  1
    Essay Review: Henry More and Newton's Gravity, Henry More: Magic, Religion and ExperimentHenry More: Magic, Religion and Experiment. HallA. Rupert . Pp. Xii + 304. £30.00. [REVIEW]John Henry - 1993 - History of Science 31 (1):83-97.
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  6. Henry J. Merry, "Montesquieu's System of Natural Government". [REVIEW]Paul B. Henry - 1971 - Theory and Decision 2 (2):217.
     
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  7. Henry More and Newton's Gravity.John Henry - 1993 - History of Science 31:83-97.
  8.  11
    The Ilumination Theory Of St. Augustine.Henry S. Bellisle - 1930 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 6:106-117.
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  9. The Illumination Theory of St. Augustine.Henry S. Bellisle - 1930 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 6:106.
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  10.  10
    Francesco Patrizi da Cherso's Concept of Space and its Later Influence.John Henry - 1979 - Annals of Science 36 (6):549-573.
    This study considers the contribution of Francesco Patrizi da Cherso to the development of the concepts of void space and an infinite universe. Patrizi plays a greater role in the development of these concepts than any other single figure in the sixteenth century, and yet his work has been almost totally overlooked. I have outlined his views on space in terms of two major aspects of his philosophical attitude: on the one hand, he was a devoted Platonist and sought always (...)
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  11. The Orthodox Foundation of Religion Long Since Collected by That Iudicious and Elegant Man, Mr. Henry Ainsworth, for the Benefit of His Private Company, and Now Divulged for the Publike Good of All That Desire to Know That Cornerstone, Christ Jesus Crucified.Henry Ainsworth & W. S. - 1641 - Printed by R.C. For M. Sparke, Junior.
     
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  12.  4
    Classics of Religious Devotion. Augustine's Confessions.Guide for the Perplexed.Imitation of Christ.Pilgrim's Progress.Journal.Out of My Life and Thought. [REVIEW]H. W. S., John Wild, Maimonides, Beryl D. Cohon, Thomas A. Kempis, Willard L. Sperry, John Bunyan'S., Perry Miller, John Woolman, Henry J. Cadbury, Albert Schweitzer & Frederick M. Eliot - 1951 - Journal of Philosophy 48 (7):223.
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  13. The Failure of Himmler's Positive EugenicsOf Pure Blood.Lucy S. Dawidowicz, Marc Hillel, Clarissa Henry & Eric Mossbacher - 1977 - Hastings Center Report 7 (5):43.
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  14.  36
    Gravity and De Gravitatione: The Development of Newton's Ideas on Action at a Distance.John Henry - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):11-27.
    This paper is in three sections. The first establishes that Newton, in spite of a well-known passage in a letter to Richard Bentley of 1692, did believe in action at a distance. Many readers may see this merely as an act of supererogation, since it is so patently obvious that he did. However, there has been a long history among Newton scholars of allowing the letter to Bentley to over-ride all of Newton’s other pronouncements in favour of action at a (...)
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  15. Aristotle's Pluralistic Realism.Devin Henry - 2011 - The Monist 94 (2):197-220.
    In this paper I explore Aristotle’s views on natural kinds and the compatibility of pluralism and realism, a topic that has generated considerable interest among contemporary philosophers. I argue that, when it came to zoology, Aristotle denied that there is only one way of organizing the diversity of the living world into natural kinds that will yield a single, unified system of classification. Instead, living things can be grouped and regrouped into various cross-cutting kinds on the basis of objective similarities (...)
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  16. How Sexist is Aristotle's Developmantal Biology?Devin Henry - 2007 - Phronesis 52 (3):251-69.
    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the level of gender bias in Aristotle’s Generation of Animals while exercising due care in the analysis of its arguments. I argue that while the GA theory is clearly sexist, the traditional interpretation fails to diagnose the problem correctly. The traditional interpretation focuses on three main sources of evidence: (1) Aristotle’s claim that the female is, as it were, a “disabled” (πεπηρωμένον) male; (2) the claim at GA IV.3, 767b6-8 that females are (...)
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  17. Aristotle’s Generation of Animals.Devin Henry - 2009 - In Georgios Anagnostopoulos (ed.), A Companion to Aristotle. Blackwell-Wiley.
    A general article discussing philosophical issues arising in connection with Aristotle's "Generation of Animals" (Chapter from Blackwell's Companion to Aristotle).
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  18. Optimality and Teleology in Aristotle's Natural Science.Devin Henry - manuscript
    In this paper I examine the role of optimality reasoning in Aristotle’s natural science. By “optimality reasoning” I mean reasoning that appeals to some conception of “what is best” in order to explain why things are the way they are. We are first introduced to this pattern of reasoning in the famous passage at Phaedo 97b8-98a2, where (Plato’s) Socrates invokes “what is best” as a cause (aitia) of things in nature. This passage can be seen as the intellectual ancestor of (...)
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  19.  37
    Children's Capacity to Agree to Psychological Research: Knowledge of Risks and Benefits and Voluntariness.Rona Abramovitch, Jonathan L. Freedman, Kate Henry & Michelle Van Brunschot - 1995 - Ethics and Behavior 5 (1):25 – 48.
    A series of studies investigated the capacity of children between the ages of 7 and 12 to give free and informed consent to participation in psychological research. Children were reasonably accurate in describing the purpose of studies, but many did not understand the possible benefits or especially the possible risks of participating. In several studies children's consent was not affected by the knowledge that their parents had given their permission or by the parents saying that they would not be upset (...)
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  20.  49
    A Sharp Eye for Kinds: Collection and Division in Plato's Late Dialogues.Devin Henry - 2011 - In Michael Frede, James V. Allen, Eyjólfur Kjalar Emilsson, Wolfgang-Rainer Mann & Benjamin Morison (eds.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 229-55.
    This paper focuses on two methodological questions that arise from Plato’s account of collection and division. First, what place does the method of collection and division occupy in Plato’s account of philosophical inquiry? Second, do collection and division in fact constitute a formal “method” (as most scholars assume) or are they simply informal techniques that the philosopher has in her toolkit for accomplishing different philosophical tasks? I argue that Plato sees collection and division as useful tools for achieving two distinct (...)
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  21.  8
    Idempotency in Whitehead's Universal Algebra.Granville C. Henry & Robert J. Valenza - 1993 - Philosophia Mathematica 1 (2):157-172.
    Alfred North Whitehead 's treatise Universal Algebra classifies algebras as either non-numerical or numerical according to whether they satisfy the law of idempotency, a + a = a. We undertake a technical critique of this classification scheme and examine how its flaws may reflect certain mathematical and philosophical biases in Whitehead 's outlook. We argue further that Whitehead 's presumption of immutable foundations for mathematics and his early commitment to the priority of objects over relations may in part account for (...)
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  22. Bridging the Gap Between Aristotle's Science and Ethics.Devin Henry & Karen Margrethe Nielsen (eds.) - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book consolidates emerging research on Aristotle's science and ethics in order to explore the extent to which the concepts, methods, and practices he developed for scientific inquiry and explanation are used to investigate moral phenomena. Each chapter shows, in a different way, that Aristotle's ethics is much more like a science than it is typically represented. The upshot of this is twofold. First, uncovering the links between Aristotle's science and ethics promises to open up new and innovative directions for (...)
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  23. Forms of Concrescence: Alfred North Whitehead's Philosophy and Computer Programming Structures.Granville C. Henry - 1994 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 30 (3):727-738.
     
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  24. Saint Anselm's de 'Grammatico'.D. P. Henry - 1960 - Philosophical Quarterly 10 (39):115-126.
  25. Baker's Dictionary of Christian Ethics.Carl F. H. Henry (ed.) - 1973 - Grand Rapids: Baker Book House.
     
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  26.  13
    Le'sniewski's Ontology and Some Medieval Logicians.Desmond Henry - 1969 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 10 (3):324-326.
  27.  13
    “Mama's Got a Brand-New Bag”: Angela Davis's Blues Legacies.Renea Henry - 1998 - Radical Philosophy Review 1 (2):146-149.
  28.  17
    Saint Anselm's Nonsense.Desmond Paul Henry - 1963 - Mind 72 (285):51-61.
  29.  10
    Getting the Message in Montaigne's.Patrick Henry - 2000 - Philosophy and Literature 24 (1).
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  30. How We Affect Each Other. Michel Henry's 'Pathos-With' and the Enactive Approach to Intersubjectivity.Hanne De Jaegher - 2015 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 22 (1-2).
    What makes it possible to affect one another, to move and be moved by another person? Why do some of our encounters transform us? The experience of moving one another points to the inter-affective in intersubjectivity. Inter-affection is hard to account for under a cognitivist banner, and has not received much attention in embodied work on intersubjectivity. I propose that understanding inter-affection needs a combination of insights into self-affection, embodiment, and interaction processes. I start from Michel Henry's radically immanent (...)
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  31.  38
    From the “Metaphysics of the Individual” to the Critique of Society: On the Practical Significance of Michel Henry's Phenomenology of Life. [REVIEW]Michael Staudigl - 2012 - Continental Philosophy Review 45 (3):339-361.
    This essay explores the practical significance of Michel Henry’s “material phenomenology.” Commencing with an exposition of his most basic philosophical intuition, i.e., his insight that transcendental affectivity is the primordial mode of revelation of our selfhood, the essay then brings to light how this intuition also establishes our relation to both the world and others. Animated by a radical form of the phenomenological reduction, Henry’s material phenomenology brackets the exterior world in a bid to reach the concrete interior (...)
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  32.  36
    Auto-Affectivity and Michel Henry's Material Phenomenology.Brian Harding - 2012 - Philosophical Forum 43 (1):91-100.
    This paper provides an introduction and overview of Michel Henry's work, with particular emphasis on his understanding of auto-affectivity. It concludes by pointing to some objections or questions sympathetic phenomenologists may have for his work.
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  33.  27
    What About Non-Human Life? An "Ecological" Reading of Michel Henry's Critique of Technology.Christina M. Gschwandtner - 2012 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 20 (2):116-138.
    This paper takes its departure from Michel Henry’s criticism of a technological view that “extends its reign to the whole planet, sowing desolation and ruin everywhere” ( I am the Truth , 271). It argues that although Henry’s critique of technology is helpful and important, it does not go far enough, inasmuch as it excludes all non-human beings from the Truth of “Life” he advocates against the destructive truths of technology and therefore cannot fully articulate the way in (...)
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  34.  1
    The Aesthetic Experience of Kandinsky’s Abstract Art: A Polemic with Henry’s Phenomenological Analysis.Anna Ziółkowska-Juś - forthcoming - Estetika.
    The French phenomenologist Michel Henry sees a similarity between the primordial experience of what he calls ‘Life’ and the aesthetic experience occasioned by Wassily Kandinsky’s abstract art. The triple aim of this essay is to explain and assess how Henry interprets Kandinsky’s abstract art and theory; what the consequences of his interpretation mean for the theory of the experience of abstract art; and what doubts and questions emerge from Henry’s interpretations of Kandinsky’s theory and practice. Despite its (...)
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  35.  2
    Discerning Subordination and Inviolability: A Comment on Kamm's Intricate Ethics: Henry S. Richardson.Henry S. Richardson - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (1):81-91.
    Frances Kamm has for some time now been a foremost champion of non-consequentialist ethics. One of her most powerful non-consequentialist themes has been the idea of inviolability. Morality's prohibitions, she argues, confer on persons the status of inviolability. This thought helps articulate a rationale for moral prohibitions that will resist the protean threat posed by the consequentialist argument that anyone should surely be willing to violate a constraint if doing so will minimize the overall number of such violations. As Kamm (...)
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  36. Logos and Immanence in Michel Henry's Phenomenology.José Ruiz Fernández - 2009 - Studia Phaenomenologica 9:83-95.
    In this paper, I will reflect on the place of language within Michel Henry’s phenomenology. I will claim that Michel Henry’s position provokes an architectonic problem in his conception of phenomenology and I will discuss how he tried to solve it. At the end of the essay, I will try to clarify what I believe to be the ultimate root of that problem involving language.
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  37. Michel Henry’s Critique of the Limits of Intuition.Jeffrey Hanson - 2009 - Studia Phaenomenologica 9:97-111.
    Intuition is surely a theme of singular importance to phenomenology, and Henry writes sometimes as if intuition should receive extensive attention from phenomenologists. However, he devotes relatively little attention to the problem of intuition himself. Instead he off ers a complex critique of intuition and the central place it enjoys in phenomenological speculation. This article reconstructs Henry’s critique and raises some questions for his counterintuitive theory of intuition. While Henry cannot make a place for the traditional sort (...)
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  38.  48
    Michel Henry’s Concept of Life.Simon Jarvis - 2009 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (3):361 - 375.
    This paper attempts to specify the force of Michel Henry?s concept of life. It suggests that the phenomenological clarity of Henry?s concept of life is nevertheless accompanied by a certain ambiguity about the relationship between phenomenological description of life, on the one hand, and the value or pathos which is attached to ?life? in Henry?s work, on the other. The article pursues this relationship by showing how Henry?s account of life?s value is developed through two subsidiary (...)
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  39.  37
    The Paradox and Limits of Michel Henry’s Concept of Transcendence.Jean‐François Lavigne - 2009 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (3):377 - 388.
    Henry?s concept of transcendence is highly paradoxical. Most often it seems as though he had simply borrowed Husserl?s classical description of intentionality, as the act of aiming?at?something as an independent object, at something given or posited by consciousness outside itself, in the status of a worldly outwardness. This determination of transcendence belongs to Henry?s usual critique of what he calls the ?ontological monism? of classical metaphysics and ?historical phenomenology?. Nevertheless, when Henry endeavours to define the ontological difference (...)
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  40.  64
    Michel Henry's Phenomenology of Aesthetic Experience and Husserlian Intentionality.Jeremy H. Smith - 2006 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (2):191-219.
    In Voir l'invisible Michel Henry applies his philosophy of autoaffection (which is both inspired by, and critical of, Husserl) to the realm of aesthetics. Henry claims that autoaffection, as non-objective experience, is essential not only to self-experience, but also to the experience of objects and their qualities. Intentionality tempts us to experience objects merely from the 'outside', but aesthetic experience returns us to the inner life of objects as a lived experience. On the basis of an examination of (...)
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  41.  8
    Heidegger and the Ontological Status of the Body A Confrontation with Michel Henry's Phenomenology of the Flesh.Jaime Llorente - 2016 - Ideas Y Valores 65 (162):261-289.
    Se examina la posición de M. Heidegger sobre el sentido ontológico de la corporalidad, como respuesta a la interpelación de aquello que se le presenta al Dasein debido a su constitución abierta al mundo. Esto lleva a preguntarse sobre la actuación corporal y técnica sobre el mundo, y sobre los otros, o al problema del cuerpo animal. Se confronta finalmente la perspectiva heideggeriana con la teoría del cuerpo subjetivo o trascendental de M. Henry, donde la apertura ontológica es reemplazada (...)
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  42.  33
    From Life to Existence: A Reconsideration of the Question of Intentionality in Michel Henry's Ethics.Frédéric Seyler - 2012 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 20 (2):98-115.
    Michel Henry has renewed our understanding of life as immanent affectivity: life cannot be reduced to what can be made visible; it is – as immanent and as affectivity – radically invisible. However, if life (la vie) is radically immanent, the living (le vivant ) has nonetheless to relate to the world: it has to exist . But, since existence requires and includes intentional components, human reality – being both living and existing – implies that immanence and intentionality be (...)
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  43.  1
    Studies on Henry of Ghent - The Relevance of Henry's Concept of Relation.Jos Decorte - 1997 - Recherches de Philosophie 64 (1):230-238.
    This modest contribution has been occasioned by the publication of the Proceedings of an international colloquium held at the De Wulf-Mansion Centre of the Institute of Philosophy in commemoration of the seven-hundredth anniversary of the death of Henry of Ghent. This colloquium had a twofold purpose: «first to establish a status quaestionis of the different fields of research concerning Henry’s doctrines and the critical edition of his work and, second, to provide a forum for specialists to exchange ideas (...)
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  44. Institutionally Divided Moral Responsibility*: HENRY S. RICHARDSON.Henry S. Richardson - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (2):218-249.
    I am going to be discussing a mode of moral responsibility that anglophone philosophers have largely neglected. It is a type of responsibility that looks to the future rather than the past. Because this forward-looking moral responsibility is relatively unfamiliar in the lexicon of analytic philosophy, many of my locutions will initially strike many readers as odd. As a matter of everyday speech, however, the notion of forward-looking moral responsibility is perfectly familiar. Today, for instance, I said I would be (...)
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  45.  16
    Fichte in 1804: A Radical Phenomenology of Life? On a Possible Comparison Between the 1804 Wissenschaftslehre and Michel Henry's Phenomenology. [REVIEW]Frédéric Seyler - 2014 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 28 (3):295-304.
    If the phenomenological movement is irreducibly tied to Husserl’s groundbreaking lifework, it has, like all philosophical currents, outer boundaries. At one end of the spectrum, Fichte’s Berlin lectures in 1804 represent not only the most accomplished and systematic version of his theory of knowing, or Wissenschaftslehre; they also contain what Fichte himself designated as Phänomenologie or as theory of appearing, Erscheinungslehre. At the other end, as one of the most prominent and challenging outcomes of contemporary phenomenology, we find Henry’s (...)
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  46.  14
    From Marx to Christianity, and Back: Michel Henry's Philosophy of Reality.Ruud Welten - 2005 - Bijdragen 66 (4):415-431.
    In the 1990s, the French phenomenologist philosopher Michel Henry gets interested in Christianity – but does not join the theological debate. Inspired by Marx – who is usually considered an atheist thinker – Henry develops a radical phenomenology of immanent self-affection. In this paper, I want to explore Henry’s writings on Marx to find out how Henry understands and constructs relations between Marx’ philosophy of reality on the one hand, and Christianity on the other.
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  47.  3
    Science and the Arts in William Henry's Research Into Inflammable Air During the Early Nineteenth Century.Leslie Tomory - 2014 - Annals of Science 71 (1):1-21.
    Historians have explored the continuities between science and the arts in the Industrial Revolution, with much recent historiography emphasizing the hybrid nature of the activities of men of science around 1800. Chemistry in particular displayed this sort of hybridity between the philosophical and practical because the materials under investigation were important across the research spectrum. Inflammable gases were an example of such hybrid objects: pneumatic chemists through the eighteenth century investigated them, and in the process created knowledge, processes and instruments (...)
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  48. Michel Henry's Reflections on Marxian Philosophy.Ladislav Hohos - 2010 - Filozofia 65 (9):833-844.
    The paper deals with M. Henry’s interpretation of Marxian philosophy in the frame of his phenomenology of life. Its aim is to show the relevance of Henry’s interpretation for the global crisis of capitalism in our times. Henry argues that economic questions in Marx’s Capital, first of all his theory of surplus value, is closely connected with the historical issues in his German ideology. Attention is also paid to Marx’s thesis about the science becoming a direct production (...)
     
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  49.  4
    Subjectivity and Living Work in Michel Henry’s Phenomenology of Life.Myriam Díaz Erbetta - 2017 - Cinta de Moebio 60:254-267.
    Resumen: A partir de sus análisis en torno a la realidad económica y social en el pensamiento de Marx, el filósofo francés Michel Henry propone que el fundamento de la economía es la subjetividad, o más bien la vida, pues es el trabajo, en cuanto “praxis viviente”, lo que define la realidad. El trabajo viviente produce y mantiene en el ser a los otros elementos de la economía, es el único que produce valor. El trabajo de cada sujeto, bajo (...)
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  50.  2
    Jewish and Post-Christian Interpretations of Hegel: Emil Fackenheim and Henry S. Harris.George di Giovanni - 2009 - The Owl of Minerva 40 (2):221-237.
    Despite the radically different interests that motivate Emil Fackenheim’s and Henry Harris’s respective interpretations of Hegel, the two have significant points of commonality. They in fact come the closest precisely at points where they seem to differ most. The need and the possibility of ‘reconciliation’ is the theme that animates both interpretations, and both also agree in their assessment of Hegel’s treatment of ‘evil.’ There are nevertheless crucial differences separating the two, which the essay details. The essay concludes wondering, (...)
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