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  1.  33
    Is Divine Relativity Possible?: Charles Hartshorne on God’s Sympathy with the World.Henry Simoni-Wastila - 1999 - Process Studies 28 (1/2):98-116.
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  2.  13
    Particularity and Pluralism: William James and the Metaphysical "End" of God.Henry Simoni-Wastila - 1999 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 20 (1):31 - 65.
  3.  15
    Inclusive Infinity and Radical Particularity: Hegel, Hartshorne and Nishida. [REVIEW]Henry Simoni-Wastila - 2002 - Sophia 41 (1):33-54.
    Three writers who utilize a similar metaphysics to understand the relationship between Ultimate Reality and conventional reality are compared. The metaphysics of what I call an inclusive Infinity is the common thread employed in comparing the thought of Hegel, Hartshorne and Nishida. I contrast the concept of inclusive Infinity with that of radical particularity and argue that people are private centers of conscious awareness who cannot be encompassed within an infinity or totality. Because of the individuality and uniqueness of particulars, (...)
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  4. Inclusive Infinity and Radical Particularity.Henry Simoni-Wastila - 1998 - The Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 36:193-198.
    God, or in Nishida’s case Buddha-nature, is frequently conceptualized as relating to the world by including it within the Infinite. Particular elements within the world are not seen as existing in absolute differentiation or total negation from Spirit, God, or Absolute Non-Being. The Many are not excluded but are, on the contrary, included within the One. The logic by which the One includes the Many is a logic of manifold unity, or, as Hegel quite confidently puts it, true infinity as (...)
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  5. Inclusive Infinity and Radical Particularity.Henry Simoni-Wastila - 1998 - The Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 5:109-114.
    God, or in Nishida's case Buddha-nature, is frequently conceptualized as relating to the world by including it within the Infinite. Particular elements within the world are not seen as existing in absolute differentiation or total negation from Spirit, God, or Absolute Non-Being. The Many are not excluded but are, on the contrary, included within the One. The logic by which the One includes the Many is a logic of manifold unity, or, as Hegel quite confidently puts it, true infinity as (...)
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  6.  35
    Māyā and Radical Particularity: Can Particular Persons Be One with Brahman? [REVIEW]Henry Simoni-Wastila - 2002 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 6 (1):1-18.
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  7.  39
    Particularity and Consciousness: Wittgenstein and Nagel on Privacy, Beetles and Bats.Henry Simoni-Wastila - 2000 - Philosophy Today 44 (4):415-425.
  8. William James on Intersubjectivity and the Absolute. A Further Contribution to URAM Studies of James (URAM Monographs No. 1, Pp. 48-77). [REVIEW]Henry Simoni-Wastila - 2003 - Ultimate Reality and Meaning 26 (1):3-21.
     
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  9.  18
    Letters to the Editor.W. F. Vallicella, Virginia Held, John Davenport, John J. Stuhr, John McCumber, Celia Wolf-Devine, Albert Cinelli, Henry Simoni-Wastila, Eugene Kelly & Brian Leiter - 1997 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 71 (2):107 - 122.
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