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  1.  49
    Ordinary Language in Memoriam.Herman Tennessen - 1965 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 8 (1-4):225 – 248.
    Taking as a point of departure a recently published collection of representative contributions from various philosophers who claim to ?proceed from ordinary language?, this article examines ordinary language philosophy in the light of some of the claims made by these philosophers. The claims are criticized mainly for failing to account for the variability of the use of terms in respect both of depth of intention and special contexts. These factors are such as to render the claims in question false when (...)
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  2.  48
    What Should We Say?Herman Tennessen - 1959 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 2 (1-4):265 – 290.
    Preliminary summaries of a few empirio?semantical investigations1 concerning such sentences as: can we say x, should we ever (ordinarily) say x, x is self?evident (tautological, contradictory, nonsensical), P does not know what be is talking about, x is voluntary (involuntary) and: that is no excuse.
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  3.  29
    Rejoinder to Naess.Herman Tennessen - 1973 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 16 (1-4):417 – 418.
  4.  28
    On Worthwhile Hypotheses.Herman Tennessen - 1959 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 2 (1-4):183 – 198.
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  5.  78
    History is Science.Herman Tennessen - 1969 - The Monist 53 (1):116-133.
    It is commonplace that whenever a metahistorian attempts to rule out some more or less general approaches to history, or certain methods, procedures as being impossible in history: “it just can’t be done!”—then, invariably, there is another metahistorian who will point to some historians who did just that, which allegedly could not be done. Equally predictable are the objections to such “contrary cases,” viz.: “That isn’t history!” What is it then? It may be religion, metaphysics, Spengler-ism, Toynbeeism,—or worse: social science, (...)
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  6.  88
    Knowledge Versus Survival.Herman Tennessen - 1973 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 16 (1-4):407 – 414.
    Our biological survival is often taken as an argument in favour of the validity of our present conceptual scheme and cognitive frame of reference. A twofold counterargument is offered: (1) Given any notion of ?knowledge?, ?insight?, etc. within our present scheme, it is possible, even plausible, that such ?knowledge? and ?insight? be extended and perfected beyond what is beneficial to the survival of mankind; (2) The alleged link between survival and veridicality is not logical but contingent and tenuously tangential. Since (...)
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  7.  91
    Whereof One has Been Silent, Thereof One May Have to Speak.Herman Tennessen - 1961 - Journal of Philosophy 58 (10):263-274.
  8.  63
    Evidence and Illustration.Herman Tennessen - 1959 - Synthese 11 (3):274 - 276.
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  9.  53
    Logical Oddities and Locutional Scarcities.Herman Tennessen - 1959 - Synthese 11 (4):369 - 388.
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  10.  16
    Knowledge "V." Survival.Herman Tennessen - 1973 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 16:407.
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  11.  10
    History is Science: Preliminary Remarks Towards an Empirical, Experimentally Oriented, Behavioural Science of History.Herman Tennessen - 1969 - The Monist 53 (1):116-133.
    It is commonplace that whenever a metahistorian attempts to rule out some more or less general approaches to history, or certain methods, procedures as being impossible in history: “it just can’t be done!”—then, invariably, there is another metahistorian who will point to some historians who did just that, which allegedly could not be done. Equally predictable are the objections to such “contrary cases,” viz.: “That isn’t history!” What is it then? It may be religion, metaphysics, Spengler-ism, Toynbeeism,—or worse: social science, (...)
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  12.  20
    Metaphysics and the Beguilement of Everyday Speech.Herman Tennessen - 1975 - Proceedings of the XVth World Congress of Philosophy 5:597-600.
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  13.  27
    Note on Confusion of Evidence and Illustration in Descriptive Definitions.Herman Tennessen - 1959 - Journal of Philosophy 56 (18):733-735.
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  14. On the Conceptual Absurdity of 'Conceptual Absurdity'.Herman Tennessen - 1974 - Philosophical Forum 5 (4):584.
  15. Problems of Knowledge: Essays at Unriddling Some Perplexing Nexus of Knowledge Notions.Herman Tennessen - 1980 - Van Gorcum.
     
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  16.  23
    Qualms About Otto Neurath’s Cabby Language.Herman Tennessen - 1982 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 16 (1):385-398.
    Otto Neurath's everyday "cabby"-language would only have preserved its appearance of a conceptual (etc.) system-neutrality to the extent at which it were to retain its semantic amorphousness as well as its user's shallow pragmatic mtentions. This (pseudo) neutrality would be irretrievably lost the moment the constituent parts of the everyday "cabby"-language were to be precised to a degree which transcended all conceivable pragmatic mtentions reasonably attributable to a cabman or to any other everyday speaker-. Dilemma: Either we settle for a (...)
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  17.  6
    Qualms About Otto Neurath’s Cabby Language.Herman Tennessen - 1982 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 16 (1):385-398.
    Otto Neurath's everyday "cabby"-language would only have preserved its appearance of a conceptual system-neutrality to the extent at which it were to retain its semantic amorphousness as well as its user's shallow pragmatic mtentions. This neutrality would be irretrievably lost the moment the constituent parts of the everyday "cabby"-language were to be precised to a degree which transcended all conceivable pragmatic mtentions reasonably attributable to a cabman or to any other everyday speaker-. Dilemma: Either we settle for a semantically and (...)
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  18.  14
    Science of History and Notions of Personality.Herman Tennessen - 1970 - In Hermann Bondi, Wolfgang Yourgrau & Allen duPont Breck (eds.), Physics, Logic, and History. New York: Plenum Press. pp. 59--77.
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  19.  68
    ‘The System of Private Enterprise’, an Empirio-Semantical Analysis of a Slogan.Herman Tennessen - 1959 - Synthese 11 (1):72 - 83.
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