Results for 'Heta H��yry'

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  1.  16
    Considerable Life Extension and Three Views on the Meaning of Life.Matti H.?? Yry - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):21.
  2.  8
    Rationality and the Genetic Challenge Revisited.Matti H.?? Yry - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (3):468.
  3.  6
    Bioethics and Political Ideology: The Case of Active Voluntary Euthanasia.Heta H.Äyry - 1997 - Bioethics 11 (3-4):271-276.
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  4.  99
    Liberalism and Legal Moralism: The Hart‐Devlin Debate and Beyond.Heta Häyry - 1991 - Ratio Juris 4 (2):202-218.
    .The legitimate impact of common morality on legal restrictions has been continuously discussed within the Western philosophy of law since Lord Patrick Devlin in the late 1950s presented his moralistic arguments against some liberal conclusions drawn by the English Committee on Homosexual Offences and Prostitution in their public report. Devlin's arguments were subsequently identified and refuted by Richard Wollheim, H. L. A. Hart and Ronald Dworkin, but in a way that later provoked further argument. In particular the attack against anti‐moralistic (...)
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  5.  75
    A Commentary on Eugene Thacker’s "Cosmic Pessimism".Gary J. Shipley & Nicola Masciandaro - 2012 - Continent 2 (2):76-81.
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 76–81 Comments on Eugene Thacker’s “Cosmic Pessimism” Nicola Masciandaro Anything you look forward to will destroy you, as it already has. —Vernon Howard In pessimism, the first axiom is a long, low, funereal sigh. The cosmicity of the sigh resides in its profound negative singularity. Moving via endless auto-releasement, it achieves the remote. “ Oltre la spera che piú larga gira / passa ’l sospiro ch’esce del mio core ” [Beyond the sphere that circles widest / penetrates (...)
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  6.  2
    The Nordic Data Imaginary.Heta Tarkkala, Karoliina Snell & Aaro Tupasela - 2020 - Big Data and Society 7 (1).
    The Nordic countries aim to have a unique place within the European and global health data economy. They have extensive nationally maintained and centralized health data records, as well as numerous biobanks where data from individuals can be connected based on personal identification numbers. Much of this phenomenon can be attributed to the emergence and development of the Nordic welfare state, where Nordic countries sought to systematically collect large amounts of population data to guide decision making and improve the health (...)
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  7.  4
    Questioning the Rhetoric of a ‘Willing Population’ in Finnish Biobanking.Heta Tarkkala & Karoliina Snell - 2019 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 15 (1):1-11.
    According to surveys and opinion polls, citizens in Nordic welfare societies have positive, supportive attitudes towards medical research and biobanking. In Finland, it was expected that this would result in the active biobank participation of patients and citizens. Indeed, public support has been rhetorically utilised as a unique societal factor and advantage in the promotion of Finnish biobanks, underlining the potential Finland offers for the international biomedical enterprise. In this paper, we critically analyse the use of notions such as ‘willing (...)
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  8.  28
    Liberalism: H. J. McCloskey.H. J. Mccloskey - 1974 - Philosophy 49 (187):13-32.
    Liberalism is commonly believed, especially by its exponents, to be opposed to interference by way of enforcing value judgments or concerning itself with the individual's morality. My concern is to show that this is not so and that liberalism is all the better for this. Many elements have contributed to liberal thought as we know it today, the major elements being the liberalism of which Locke is the most celebrated exponent, which is based upon a belief in natural, human rights; (...)
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  9.  19
    Finnish Physicians’ Attitudes Towards Active Euthanasia Have Become More Positive Over the Last 10 Years.Pekka Louhiala, Heta Enkovaara, Hannu Halila, Heikki Pälve & Jukka Vänskä - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (4):353-355.
  10.  21
    Academic Well-Being, Mathematics Performance, and Educational Aspirations in Lower Secondary Education: Changes Within a School Year.Anna Widlund, Heta Tuominen & Johan Korhonen - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  11.  30
    The Limits of Medical Paternalism.Paula Boddington & Heta Hayry - 1993 - Philosophical Quarterly 43 (171):263.
    The Limits of Medical Paternalism defines and morally assesses paternalistic interventions, especially in the context of modern medicine and health care, particular emphasis is given to the analysis of the conceptual background of the paternalism issue. In this book an anti-paternalistic view is presented and defended.
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  12.  91
    Global Bioethics: The Collapse of Consensus : Edited by H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr.H. Tristram Engelhardt (ed.) - 2006 - M & M Scrivener Press.
    This collection of essays, Global Bioethics: The Collapse of Consensus, deals with the issue of the repeated failure of attempts to derive a universal set of ...
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  13.  13
    H. E. Armstrong and the Teaching of Science, 1880-1930.W. H. Brock - 1974 - British Journal of Educational Studies 22 (1):119-120.
  14.  34
    J. H. Hexter, Neo-Whiggism And Early Stuart Historiography.William H. Dray - 1987 - History and Theory 26 (2):133-149.
    J. H. Hexter, an American historian of early seventeenth-century history, terms himself whiggish and claims whiggishness is returning after the misguided popularity of Marxism. The distinction "whiggish" is more elusive than his claim suggests, and the accuracy of its application to Hexter's claim is unclear. Three characteristics commonly assigned to whig interpretation by its critics can be seen as reflections of broader, unresolved historical issues. These are: attention to political and constitutional issues; a tendency to refer to the present in (...)
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  15.  23
    The Limits of Medical Paternalism.Heta Häyry - 1991 - Routledge.
    _The Limits of Medical Paternalism_ defines and morally assesses paternalistic interventions, especially in the context of modern medicine and health care, particular emphasis is given to the analysis of the conceptual background of the paternalism issue. In this book an anti-paternalistic view is presented and defended.
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  16.  27
    Response by H. H. Pattee to Jon Umerez’s Paper: “Where Does Pattee’s “How Does a Molecule Become a Message?” Belong in the History of Biosemiotics?”. [REVIEW]H. H. Pattee - 2009 - Biosemiotics 2 (3):291-302.
    Umerez’s analysis made me aware of the fundamental differences in the culture of physics and molecular biology and the culture of semiotics from which the new field of biosemiotics arose. These cultures also view histories differently. Considering the evolutionary span and the many hierarchical levels of organization that their models must cover, models at different levels will require different observables and different meanings for common words, like symbol, interpretation, and language. These models as well as their histories should be viewed (...)
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  17.  13
    William H. Bragg's Corpuscular Theory of X-Rays and Γ-Rays.Roger H. Stuewer - 1971 - British Journal for the History of Science 5 (3):258-281.
    The modern corpuscular theory of radiation was born in 1905 when Einstein advanced his light quantum hypothesis; and the steps by which Einstein's hypothesis, after years of profound scepticism, was finally and fully vindicated by Arthur Compton's 1922 scattering experiments constitutes one of the most stimulating chapters in the history of recent physics. To begin to appreciate the complexity of this chapter, however, it is only necessary to emphasize an elementary but very significant point, namely, that while Einstein based his (...)
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  18. WADDINGTON, C. H. - "The Ethical Animal". [REVIEW]C. H. Whiteley - 1962 - Mind 71:136.
  19.  28
    II. Human Flourishing: H. MEYNELL.H. Meynell - 1969 - Religious Studies 5 (2):147-154.
    Miss G. E. M. Anscombe has said that, in order for progress to be made in ethics, we must have some determinate idea of ‘human flourishing.’ I want to cite in what follows the work of a number of writers in the psychiatric field who seem to me to throw light on just what it is for a human individual to flourish, for a human community to flourish, and for a human individual to flourish in relation to or in spite (...)
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  20.  23
    Micro-Composition1: D. H. Mellor.D. H. Mellor - 2008 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 62:65-80.
    Entities of many kinds, not just material things, have been credited with parts. Armstrong, for example, has taken propositions and properties to be parts of their conjunctions, sets to be parts of sets that include them, and geographical regions and events to be parts of regions and events that contain them. The justification for bringing all these diverse relations under a single ‘part–whole’ concept is that they share all or most of the formal features articulated in mereology. But the concept (...)
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  21.  74
    Belief ‘In’ and Belief ‘That’1: H. H. PRICE.H. H. Price - 1965 - Religious Studies 1 (1):5-27.
    Epistemologists have not usually had much to say about believing ‘in’, though ever since Plato's time they have been interested in believing ‘that’. Students of religion, on the other hand, have been greatly concerned with belief ‘in’, and many of them, I think, would maintain that it is something quite different from belief ‘that’. Surely belief ‘in’ is an attitude to a person, whether human or divine, while belief ‘that’ is just an attitude to a proposition? Could any difference be (...)
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  22.  21
    Review of H. Joas, Die Kreativität des Handelns. [REVIEW]H. G. Callaway - 1995 - Philasophical Quarterly (Scotland) 45 (179):247-249.
  23.  15
    A Threat Like No Other Threat, George Berkeley Against the Freethinkers.Timo Airaksinen & Heta Gylling - 2017 - History of European Ideas 43 (6):598-613.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, our purpose is to show what George Berkeley really said about ethics and the background conditions of religious life. The point is that true happiness is only possible in a religious sense; it means happiness in afterlife. The major threat to this is freethinking, or what we see as emerging enlightened modernism. His rather quixotic fix against freethinking shows the man as he is behind all the conventional panegyrics. He is a real Anglican soldier who anticipated but (...)
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  24.  27
    Utilitarianism, Human Rights and the Redistribution of Health Through Preventive Medical Measures.Heta Häyry & Matti Häyry - 1989 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (1):43-52.
  25.  30
    Autonomy Revisited.Heta Aleksandra Gylling - 2004 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (1):41-46.
    One of the core issues in medical ethics has been and still is autonomy, people's right to make their own self-regarding choices in situations where more than one option is available. Depending on the case, these choices may be influenced by personal life history, one's ethical and other values, and one's future expectancies. A professional soccer player may risk an operation, which for a less athletic individual would represent an unnecessary risk that might jeopardize her ability to even walk. Saying (...)
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  26.  21
    T. H. Huxley on Education.Cyril Bibby & T. H. Huxley - 1972 - British Journal of Educational Studies 20 (3):352-353.
  27.  26
    Max H. Fisch: Rigorous Humanist.Edward H. Madden - 1986 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 22 (4):375 - 396.
  28.  30
    Moral Obligation After the Death of God: Critical Reflections on Concerns From Immanuel Kant, G. W. F. Hegel, and Elizabeth Anscombe: H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr. [REVIEW]H. Tristram Engelhardt - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (2):317-340.
    Once God is no longer recognized as the ground and the enforcer of morality, the character and force of morality undergoes a significant change, a point made by G.E.M. Anscombe in her observation that without God the significance of morality is changed, as the word criminal would be changed if there were no criminal law and criminal courts. There is no longer in principle a God's-eye perspective from which one can envisage setting moral pluralism aside. In addition, it becomes impossible (...)
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  29.  8
    Aids Now.Heta Häyry & Matti Hayry - 1987 - Bioethics 1 (4):339–356.
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  30.  8
    Old Age, Painting, and Gerontology.Heta Kauppinen - 1988 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 22 (2):87.
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  31.  61
    Obedience to Rules and Berkeley's Theological Utilitarianism.Matti Häyry & Heta Häyry - 1994 - Utilitas 6 (2):233.
    According to what one might call ‘indirect” forms of utilitarian thinking, the proper end of all human action is the greatest happiness of the greatest number of individuals, but due to the fallibility of moral agents this end cannot, and must not, be directly pursued. Instead, according to at least one version of the indirect theory, moral agents have a duty to act in conformity with a set of general rules which, in their turn, have been designed to promote the (...)
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  32. The Problem of Life After Death: H. H. PRICE.H. H. Price - 1968 - Religious Studies 3 (2):447-459.
    May I first say, Mr Chairman, that I regard it as a great honour to have been invited to take part in this Conference? I speak to you as a philosopher who happens to be interested both in religion and in psychical research. But I am afraid I am going to discuss some questions which it is ‘not done’ to talk about.
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  33.  58
    Transcendental Tense: D.H. Mellor.D. H. Mellor - 1998 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):29–44.
    [D. H. Mellor] Kant's claim that our knowledge of time is transcendental in his sense, while false of time itself, is true of tenses, i.e. of the locations of events and other temporal entities in McTaggart's A series. This fact can easily, and I think only, be explained by taking time itself to be real but tenseless. /// [J. R. Lucas] Mellor's argument from Kant fails. The difficulties in his first Antinomy are due to topological confusions, not the tensed nature (...)
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  34.  29
    A Multidimensional PERMA-H Positive Education Model, General Satisfaction of School Life, and Character Strengths Use in Hong Kong Senior Primary School Students: Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Path Analysis Using the APASO-II.Man K. Lai, Cynthia Leung, Sylvia Y. C. Kwok, Anna N. N. Hui, Herman H. M. Lo, Janet T. Y. Leung & Cherry H. L. Tam - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  35.  24
    Thespis. Ritual, Myth and Drama in the Ancient Near East. By T. H. Gaster. Pp. Xv + 498. New York: Henry Schuman, 1950. $8.50. [REVIEW]H. J. Rose - 1952 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 72:145-145.
  36.  55
    Wittgenstein 1929–1931: H. D. P. Lee.H. D. P. Lee - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (208):211-220.
    The following brief memoir of Wittgenstein needs a few preliminary words of explanation. Among those who attended his lectures and discussions in the years it covers was D. G. James, who later became Professor of English at Bristol University and then Vice-Chancellor of Southampton University. I met him both in Bristol and Southampton, and on one occasion suggested to him that some of us who had known Wittgenstein, but who had not become professional philosophers, might write down our recollections of (...)
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  37.  31
    The Aroma of Coffee: H. O. Mounce.H. O. Mounce - 1989 - Philosophy 64 (248):159-173.
    My title has been taken from the following passage in Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations : Describe the aroma of coffee—why can't it be done? Do we lack the words? And for what are words lacking?—But how do we get the idea that such a description must after all be possible? Have you ever felt the lack of such a description? Have you tried to describe the aroma and not succeeded?
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  38.  17
    Reply to Professor Miles: H. MEYNELL.H. Meynell - 1969 - Religious Studies 5 (2):161-162.
  39. Aristotle: The Nicomachean Ethics. A Commentary by the Late H. H. JOACHIM. By Charles Wegener.H. H. Joachim & D. A. Rees - 1951 - Ethics 62 (4):300-301.
     
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  40.  45
    The Reduction of Society: D. H. Mellor.D. H. Mellor - 1982 - Philosophy 57 (219):51-75.
    How does the study of society relate to the study of the people it comprises? This longstanding question is partly one of method, but mainly one of fact, of how independent the objects of these two studies, societies and people, are. It is commonly put as a question of reduction, and I shall tackle it in that form: does sociology reduce in principle to individual psychology? I follow custom in calling the claim that it does ‘individualism’ and its denial ‘holism’.
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  41.  14
    Sparta. By H. Michell. Pp. Viii + 348. Cambridge: University Press, 1952. 35s.H. W. Stubbs & H. Michell - 1953 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:170-171.
  42.  22
    Art and Real Life: H. O. Mounce.H. O. Mounce - 1980 - Philosophy 55 (212):183-192.
    In 1954 F. R. Leavis wrote to the Times Literary Supplement taking issue with one of its reviewers. The reviewer had contrasted Leavis's approach to Shakespeare with that of Empson and Bradley. The latter, the reviewer had said, ‘like the plain man, or the audience in a theatre, cannot help considering the situation [in one of Shakespeare's plays] as “actual” and the characters as “real”’. Leavis, the reviewer had implied, treats the situation and characters somewhat differently.
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  43.  13
    Issues in Contemporary Legal Philosophy: The Influence of H.L.A. Hart.H. L. A. Hart & Ruth Gavison (eds.) - 1987 - Oxford University Press.
    This is a collection of essays on themes of legal philosophy which have all been generated or affected by Hart's work. The topics covered include legal theory, responsibility, and enforcement of morals, with contributions from Ronald Dworkin, Rolf Sartorius, Neil MacCormach, David Lyons, Kent Greenawalt, Michael Moore, Joseph Raz, and C.L. Ten, among others.
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  44.  7
    Should the Decisions of Ethics Committees Be Based on Community Values?Heta Häyry - 1998 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 1 (1):57-60.
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  45.  28
    Bioethics and Political Ideology: The Case of Active Voluntary Euthanasia.Heta Hayry - 1997 - Bioethics 11 (3-4):271-276.
  46.  37
    The Philosophy of T. H. Green.H. Sidgwick - 1901 - Mind 10 (37):18-29.
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  47.  3
    Striving for Success but at What Cost? Subject-Specific Achievement Goal Orientation Profiles, Perceived Cost, and Academic Well-Being.Heta Tuominen, Henriikka Juntunen & Markku Niemivirta - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  48. Taking Property Rights Seriously: The Case of Climate Change: Jonathan H. Adler.Jonathan H. Adler - 2009 - Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (2):296-316.
    The dominant approach to environmental policy endorsed by conservative and libertarian policy thinkers, so-called “free market environmentalism”, is grounded in the recognition and protection of property rights in environmental resources. Despite this normative commitment to property rights, most self-described FME advocates adopt a utilitarian, welfare-maximization approach to climate change policy, arguing that the costs of mitigation measures could outweigh the costs of climate change itself. Yet even if anthropogenic climate change is decidedly less than catastrophic, human-induced climate change is likely (...)
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  49.  29
    Law's Halo: DONALD H. REGAN.Donald H. Regan - 1986 - Social Philosophy and Policy 4 (1):15-30.
    Like many people these days, I believe there is no general moral obligation to obey the law. I shall explain why there is no such moral obligation – and I shall clarify what I mean when I say there is no moral obligation to obey the law – as we proceed. But also like many people, I am unhappy with a position that would say there was no moral obligation to obey the law and then say no more about the (...)
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  50.  90
    Nature and Natural Authority in Bentham*: J. H. Burns.J. H. Burns - 1993 - Utilitas 5 (2):209-219.
    My object in this paper is to suggest a few reflections on some themes in Bentham's work which others as well as I have noted, without perhaps developing them as fully as might with advantage be done. There will be nothing like full development in the limited compass of what is said here, but what is said may at least indicate possible directions for further exploration. The greater part of the paper will be concerned with the notion of natural authority; (...)
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