Results for 'Hierarchical labels'

998 found
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  1.  30
    Labels as Features (Not Names) for Infant Categorization: A Neurocomputational Approach.Valentina Gliozzi, Julien Mayor, Jon-Fan Hu & Kim Plunkett - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (4):709-738.
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  2.  21
    Product Differentiation Via Corporate Social Responsibility: Consumer Priorities and the Mediating Role of Food Labels.Marco Costanigro, Oana Deselnicu & Dawn Thilmany McFadden - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (3):597-609.
    This article examines quantitatively the determinants of purchase decisions based on corporate social responsibility, adopting a hierarchical conceptual model of decision making where the key factors are personal concern, information availability and financial considerations. We use best–worst methods to assess consumer priorities for CSR activities in milk production; and elicit consumer interpretation of four labels in terms of CSR and other outcomes. We then elicit willingness to pay for the labels, and estimate regression models to determine how (...)
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  3.  9
    Population-Genetic Trees, Maps, and Narratives of the Great Human Diasporas.Marianne Sommer - 2015 - History of the Human Sciences 28 (5):108-145.
    From the 1960s, mathematical and computational tools have been developed to arrive at human population trees from various kinds of serological and molecular data. Focusing on the work of the Italian-born population geneticist Luigi Luca Cavalli-Sforza, I follow the practices of tree-building and mapping from the early blood-group studies to the current genetic admixture research. I argue that the visual language of the tree is paralleled in the narrative of the human diasporas, and I show how the tree was actually (...)
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  4.  29
    Hospitality as Openness to the Other: Levinas, Derrida and the Indian Hospitality Ethos.Siby K. George - 2009 - Journal of Human Values 15 (1):29-47.
    In contemporary discourses on cosmo-political hospitality, contributions of Derrida, and especially of Levinas, have special significance on account of the vision, scale and relevance of their discussions on the theme, in the context of an increasingly globalizing international scene, and the consequent global encounter with diversity. The article strives to read the Indian hospitality tradition and ethos, articulated in several of India's culturally significant texts, and available in some way as a cultural practice even to this day , through the (...)
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  5.  94
    Music Cognition as a Window to the World.Mark Reybrouck - 2011 - Semiotics:55-62.
    Worldviews are windows to the world. They can be static in referring to visual connotations as suggested by their name, but they can hold a dynamic and genetic view as well. As such, they imply a fundamental cognitive orientation, involving selection, interpretation and interaction with the world. What matters, in this view, is a kind of sense-making or semiotization of the world. -/- The semiotization of the “sonic world”, accordingly, can be approached from different epistemological positions: is music reducible to (...)
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  6. Particle Labels and the Theory of Indistinguishable Particles in Quantum Mechanics.Michael Redhead & Paul Teller - 1992 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (2):201-218.
    We extend the work of French and Redhead [1988] further examining the relation of quantum statistics to the assumption that quantum entities have the sort of identity generally assumed for physical objects, more specifically an identity which makes them susceptible to being thought of as conceptually individuatable and labelable even though they cannot be experimentally distinguished. We also further examine the relation of such hypothesized identity of quantum entities to the Principle of the Identity of Indiscernibles. We conclude that although (...)
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  7.  50
    New Labels for Old Ideas: Predictive Processing and the Interpretation of Neural Signals.Rosa Cao - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 11 (3):517-546.
    Philosophical proponents of predictive processing cast the novelty of predictive models of perception in terms of differences in the functional role and information content of neural signals. However, they fail to provide constraints on how the crucial semantic mapping from signals to their informational contents is determined. Beyond a novel interpretative gloss on neural signals, they have little new to say about the causal structure of the system, or even what statistical information is carried by the signals. That means that (...)
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  8.  34
    Labels Can Override Perceptual Categories in Early Infancy.Kim Plunkett, Jon-Fan Hu & Leslie B. Cohen - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):665-681.
  9.  34
    Hierarchical Bayesian Models of Delusion.Daniel Williams - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 61:129-147.
  10.  54
    Hierarchical Analyses of Unfree Action.Irving Thalberg - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):211 - 226.
    Metaphysicians, ethical theorists and philosophers of law squabble endlessly about what it is for a person to act — or perhaps even to ‘will’ — more or less freely. A vital issue in this controversy is how we should analyse two obvious but surprisingly problematical contrasts. The first antithesis is between things we do because we are forced, and deeds we perform because we want to — sometimes after having discovered preponderant reasons in their favour. The other polarity is more (...)
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  11.  88
    Hierarchical Propositions.Bruno Whittle - 2017 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 46 (2):215-231.
    The notion of a proposition is central to philosophy. But it is subject to paradoxes. A natural response is a hierarchical account and, ever since Russell proposed his theory of types in 1908, this has been the strategy of choice. But in this paper I raise a problem for such accounts. While this does not seem to have been recognized before, it would seem to render existing such accounts inadequate. The main purpose of the paper, however, is to provide (...)
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  12.  17
    Hierarchical Minds and the Perception/Cognition Distinction.Daniel Williams - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy:1-23.
    ABSTRACTRecent research in cognitive and computational neuroscience portrays the neocortex as a hierarchically structured prediction machine. Several theorists have drawn on this research to challe...
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  13.  37
    Labels and the Treatment of Animals: Archival and Experimental Cases.Heather D. Craft, D. W. Rajecki & Jeffrey Lee Rasmussen - 1993 - Society and Animals 1 (1):45-60.
    The proposition that sheer labels or categories are important in people's reactions to the treatment of animals was supported by evidence from two sources. First, print archives showed that in the real world animals with a great deal in common such as dolphins and tuna in the same nets; cats and dogs, and pigs and goats in the same laboratories; and native and feral species in the same parks are viewed or treated quite differently by humans. Second, original experiments (...)
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  14.  7
    Hierarchical Structure in Sequence Processing: How to Measure It and Determine Its Neural Implementation.Julia Uddén, Mauricio de Jesus Dias Martins, Willem Zuidema & W. Tecumseh Fitch - 2020 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (3):910-924.
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  15. Hierarchical Maximization of Two Kinds of Expected Utility.Paul Weirich - 1988 - Philosophy of Science 55 (4):560-582.
    Causal decision theory produces decision instability in cases such as Death in Damascus where a decision itself provides evidence concerning the utility of options. Several authors have proposed ways of handling this instability. William Harper (1985 and 1986) advances one of the most elegant proposals. He recommends maximizing causal expected utility among the options that are causally ratifiable. Unfortunately, Harper's proposal imposes certain restrictions; for instance, the restriction that mixed strategies are freely available. To obtain a completely general method of (...)
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  16.  29
    Food Labels, Genetic Information, and the Right Not to Know.Michele Loi - 2014 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (4):323-344.
    This paper explores the analogy between food label information and genetic information, in order to defend the right not to know judgmental nutritional information, such as the one conveyed by traffic light labels and other, more aggressive, recent proposals. Traffic light labeling judges the nutritional quality of food by means of colored flags on the front pack . It involves a simplification of the link between food quality and health outcomes. Unlike GDAs ,1 it does not present the consumer (...)
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  17.  18
    Verbal Labels Facilitate Tactile Perception.Tally McCormick Miller, Timo Torsten Schmidt, Felix Blankenburg & Friedemann Pulvermüller - 2018 - Cognition 171:172-179.
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  18.  18
    Hierarchical Active Inference: A Theory of Motivated Control.Giovanni Pezzulo, Francesco Rigoli & Karl J. Friston - 2018 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 22 (4):294-306.
  19.  39
    On Labels and Issues: The Lysenko Controversy and the Cold War.William deJong-Lambert & Nikolai Krementsov - 2012 - Journal of the History of Biology 45 (3):373-388.
  20.  99
    The Hierarchical Abuse of Power in Work Organizations.Donald Vredenburgh & Yael Brender - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (12):1337-1347.
    Although much theoretical and empirical research has examined organizational power, virtually none has addressed the hierarchical abuse of power in organizations. Managers' incentives and discretion and subordinates' dependencies define the abuse of power as an important organizational issue. This paper offers a conceptualization and process model to help further theoretical and applied understanding, and it considers the ethical nature of power abuse. Two dimensions, disrespect for individual dignity and interference with job performance or deserved rewards, conceptualize the interpersonal abuse (...)
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  21.  65
    A Hierarchical Model of Temporal Perception.Ernst Pöppel - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (2):56-61.
  22.  5
    Clustering, Hierarchical Organization, and the Topography of Abstract and Concrete Nouns.Joshua Troche, Sebastian Crutch & Jamie Reilly - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  23. Hierarchical Control or Individuals' Moral Autonomy? Addressing a Fundamental Tension in the Management of Business Ethics.Patrick Maclagan - 2007 - Business Ethics 16 (1):48–61.
    There is a fundamental tension in business ethics between the apparent need to ensure ethical conduct through hierarchical control, and the encouragement of individuals' potential for autonomous moral judgement. In philosophical terms, these positions are consequentialist and Kantian, respectively. This paper assumes the former to be the dominant position in practice, and probably in theory also, but regards it as a misplaced extension of the more general managerial tendency to seek and maintain control over employees. While the functions of (...)
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  24.  23
    Food Labels, Autonomy, and the Right to Know.Matteo Bonotti - 2014 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (4):301-321.
    The Italian government recently criticized the UK’s “traffic light” food labelling system for unfairly discriminating against some traditional Italian foods such as mozzarella, Parma ham, and Parmesan cheese . This type of labelling highlights the percentages of fat, saturated fat, salt, sugar, and calories of each food and classifies them by using red, amber, and green colors depending on the level of each nutrient. While it is true that some Italian foods do contain a high level of fat or salt (...)
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  25.  24
    Separating Hierarchical Relations and Word Order in Language Production: Is Proximity Concord Syntactic or Linear?Gabriella Vigliocco & Janet Nicol - 1998 - Cognition 68 (1):B13-B29.
  26.  50
    Particles, Particle Labels, and Quanta: The Toll of Unacknowledged Metaphysics. [REVIEW]Michael Redhead & Paul Teller - 1991 - Foundations of Physics 21 (1):43-62.
    The practice of describing multiparticle quantum systems in terms of labeled particles indicates that we think of quantum entities as individuatable. The labels, together with particle indistinguishability, create the need for symmetrization or antisymmetrization (or, in principle, higher-order symmetries), which in turn results in “surplus formal structure” in the formalism, formal structure which corresponds to nothing in the real world. We argue that these facts show quanta to be unindividuatable entities, things in principle incapable of supporting labels, and (...)
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  27.  39
    Hierarchical Models of Behavior and Prefrontal Function.Matthew M. Botvinick - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (5):201.
  28.  9
    Mathematical Generality, Letter-Labels, and All That.F. Acerbi - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (1):27-75.
    This article focusses on the generality of the entities involved in a geometric proof of the kind found in ancient Greek treatises: it shows that the standard modern translation of Greek mathematical propositions falsifies crucial syntactical elements, and employs an incorrect conception of the denotative letters in a Greek geometric proof; epigraphic evidence is adduced to show that these denotative letters are ‘letter-labels’. On this basis, the article explores the consequences of seeing that a Greek mathematical proposition is fully (...)
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  29.  27
    Hierarchical Process Memory: Memory as an Integral Component of Information Processing.Uri Hasson, Janice Chen & Christopher J. Honey - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (6):304-313.
  30.  60
    Hierarchical Inconsistencies: A Critical Assessment of Justification.Juozas Kasputis - 2019 - Economic Thought 8 (2):1-12.
    The existential insecurity of human beings has induced them to create protective spheres of symbols: myths, religions, values, belief systems, theories, etc. Rationality is one of the key factors contributing to the construction of civilisation in technical and symbolic terms. As Hankiss has emphasised, protective spheres of symbols may collapse – thus causing a profound social crisis. Social and political transformations had a tremendous impact at the end of the 20th century. As a result, management theories have been revised in (...)
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  31.  6
    Labels for Animal Husbandry Systems Meet Consumer Preferences: Results From a Meta-Analysis of Consumer Studies.Meike Janssen, Manika Rödiger & Ulrich Hamm - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (6):1071-1100.
    Political decision-makers in the European Union are currently discussing the introduction of a mandatory uniform labelling scheme for meat and milk that provides information on husbandry systems similar to the already existent labelling scheme in the EU egg market. The objective of this paper was to assess whether such information is relevant to consumers when buying meat and milk. The paper was based on a systematic synthesis of 53 scientific journal articles on empirical consumer studies. The review revealed that consumers (...)
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  32.  8
    Hierarchical Structure in Sequence Processing: How to Measure It and Determine Its Neural Implementation.Julia Uddén, Mauricio Jesus Dias Martins, Willem Zuidema & W. Tecumseh Fitch - 2020 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (3):910-924.
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  33.  18
    Labels of Origin for Food, the New Economy and Opportunities for Rural Development in the US.Jim Bingen - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (4):543-552.
    This paper draws upon the events surrounding two small United States Department of Agriculture-funded projects in order to explore some preliminary ideas about the influence of corporations in US policy-making through federal advisory committees created by the 1972 Federal Advisory Committee Act. Following a synopsis of the political controversy created by the efforts of these projects to generate more discussion of geographical indications in the US, this paper outlines a path for further analysis of the relationships between members of advisory (...)
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  34. Content and Misrepresentation in Hierarchical Generative Models.Alex Kiefer & Jakob Hohwy - 2018 - Synthese 195 (6):2387-2415.
    In this paper, we consider how certain longstanding philosophical questions about mental representation may be answered on the assumption that cognitive and perceptual systems implement hierarchical generative models, such as those discussed within the prediction error minimization framework. We build on existing treatments of representation via structural resemblance, such as those in Gładziejewski :559–582, 2016) and Gładziejewski and Miłkowski, to argue for a representationalist interpretation of the PEM framework. We further motivate the proposed approach to content by arguing that (...)
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  35.  28
    Hierarchical Categorical Perception in Sensing and Cognitive Processes.Luis Emilio Bruni - 2008 - Biosemiotics 1 (1):113-130.
    This article considers categorical perception (CP) as a crucial process involved in all sort of communication throughout the biological hierarchy, i.e. in all of biosemiosis. Until now, there has been consideration of CP exclusively within the functional cycle of perception–cognition–action and it has not been considered the possibility to extend this kind of phenomena to the mere physiological level. To generalise the notion of CP in this sense, I have proposed to distinguish between categorical perception (CP) and categorical sensing (CS) (...)
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  36.  66
    Hierarchical Structures.Stanley N. Salthe - 2012 - Axiomathes 22 (3):355 - 383.
    This paper compares the two known logical forms of hierarchy, both of which have been used in models of natural phenomena, including the biological. I contrast their general properties, internal formal relations, modes of growth (emergence) in applications to the natural world, criteria for applying them, the complexities that they embody, their dynamical relations in applied models, and their informational relations and semiotic aspects.
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  37.  17
    Hierarchical Motive Structures and Their Role in Moral Choices.Richard P. Bagozzi, Leslie E. Sekerka & Vanessa Hill - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S4):461 - 486.
    Leader-managers face a myriad of competing values when they engage in ethical decision-making. Few studies help us understand why certain reasons for action are justified, taking precedence over others when people choose to respond to an ethical dilemma. To help address this matter we began with a qualitative approach to disclose leader-managers' moral motives when they decide to address a work-related ethical dilemma. One hundred and nine military officers were asked to provide their reasons for taking action, justifications of their (...)
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  38.  12
    A Hierarchical Model of Inhibitory Control.Jeggan Tiego, Renee Testa, Mark A. Bellgrove, Christos Pantelis & Sarah Whittle - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  39.  16
    Governance of Eco-Labels: Expert Opinion and Media Coverage.Pavel Castka & Charles J. Corbett - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (2):309-326.
    “Eco-labels” are an increasingly important form of private regulation for sustainability in areas such as carbon emissions, water consumption, ethical sourcing, or organic produce. The growing interest and popularity of eco-labels has also been coupled with growing concerns about their credibility, in part because the standard-setting and conformity assessment practices that eco-labels adopt exhibit striking differences. In this paper, we assess which assurance practices contribute to eco-labels being perceived as better governed, in the eyes of experts (...)
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  40. A Hierarchical Framework for Levels of Reality: Understanding Through Representation. [REVIEW]Stanley N. Salthe - 2009 - Axiomathes 19 (1):87-99.
    Levels of reality reflect one kind of complexity, which can be modeled using a specification hierarchy. Levels emerged during the Big Bang, as physical degrees of freedom became increasingly fixed as the expanding universe developed, and new degrees of freedom associated with higher levels opened up locally, requiring new descriptive semantics. History became embodied in higher level entities, which are increasingly individuated, aggregate patterns of lower level entities. Development is an epigenetic trajectory from vaguer to more definite and individuated embodiment, (...)
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  41. The Limitations of Hierarchical Organization.Angela Potochnik & Brian McGill - 2012 - Philosophy of Science 79 (1):120-140.
    The concept of hierarchical organization is commonplace in science. Subatomic particles compose atoms, which compose molecules; cells compose tissues, which compose organs, which compose organisms; etc. Hierarchical organization is particularly prominent in ecology, a field of research explicitly arranged around levels of ecological organization. The concept of levels of organization is also central to a variety of debates in philosophy of science. Yet many difficulties plague the concept of discrete hierarchical levels. In this paper, we show how (...)
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  42.  2
    Hierarchical Organization in Ordered Domains: Estimating the Dates of Events.Janellen Huttenlocher, Larry Hedges & Vincent Prohaska - 1988 - Psychological Review 95 (4):471-484.
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  43.  43
    Learning by Imitation: A Hierarchical Approach.Richard W. Byrne & Anne E. Russon - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):667-684.
    To explain social learning without invoking the cognitively complex concept of imitation, many learning mechanisms have been proposed. Borrowing an idea used routinely in cognitive psychology, we argue that most of these alternatives can be subsumed under a single process, priming, in which input increases the activation of stored internal representations. Imitation itself has generally been seen as a This has diverted much research towards the all-or-none question of whether an animal can imitate, with disappointingly inconclusive results. In the great (...)
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  44. Hierarchical Consequentialism.Re'em Segev - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (3):309-330.
    The paper considers a hierarchical theory that combines concern for two values: individual well-being – as a fundamental, first-order value – and (distributive) fairness – as a high-order value that its exclusive function is to complete the value of individual well-being by resolving internal clashes within it that occur in interpersonal conflicts. The argument for this unique conception of high-order fairness is that fairness is morally significant in itself only regarding what matters – individual well-being – and when it (...)
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  45.  25
    The Hierarchical Iterative Identification Algorithm for Multi-Input-Output-Error Systems with Autoregressive Noise.Jiling Ding - 2017 - Complexity:1-11.
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  46.  14
    Hierarchical Beam Search for Solving Most Relevant Explanation in Bayesian Networks.Xiaoyuan Zhu & Changhe Yuan - 2017 - Journal of Applied Logic 22:3-13.
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  47.  31
    The Role of Quality Labels in Market-Driven Animal Welfare.Lennart Ravn Heerwagen, Morten Raun Mørkbak, Sigrid Denver, Peter Sandøe & Tove Christensen - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (1):67-84.
    In policy-making the consumption of specially labelled products, and its role in improving the welfare of livestock, has attracted considerable attention. There is in many countries a diverse market for animal welfare-friendly products which is potentially confusing and may lack transparency. We ask whether special quality labels that involve medium levels of animal welfare, as compared with labels promoting premium levels of animal welfare, have a role to play in promoting improvements in animal welfare. The Danish pork market (...)
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  48.  9
    Hierarchical Organization in Visual Working Memory: From Global Ensemble to Individual Object Structure.Qi-Yang Nie, Hermann J. Müller & Markus Conci - 2017 - Cognition 159:85-96.
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  49.  2
    Beyond Hierarchical Oppositions: A Feminist Critique of Karen Barad’s Agential Realism.Caroline Braunmühl - 2018 - Feminist Theory 19 (2):223-240.
    The article contributes to the debate on new materialism commenced by Sara Ahmed. Taking up Lena Gunnarsson’s argument that erasing distinctions is no effective antidote to dualistic theorising, the article argues that Karen Barad’s theory is problematic on this count. Whereas Barad dilutes the theoretical distinction between mind and matter as well as that between the animate and the inanimate, the contention here is that it is ethically and politically vital to hold on to a notion of subjectivity understood in (...)
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  50.  16
    Ethnic Labels and Philosophy.Jorge J. E. Gracia - 1999 - Philosophy Today 43 (9999):42-49.
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