45 found
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  1. The Patient in the Family: An Ethics of Medicine and Families.Hilde Lindemann Nelson & James Lindemann Nelson - 1995 - Routledge.
    The Patient in the Family diagnoses the ways in which the worlds of home and hospital misunderstand each other. The authors explore how medicine, through its new reproductive technologies, is altering the stucture of families, how families can participate more fully in medical decision-making, and how to understand the impact on families of medical advances to extend life but not vitality.
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  2.  1
    Stories and Their Limits: Narrative Approaches to Bioethics.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1997 - Routledge.
    First published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  3.  44
    What Child Is This?Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 2002 - Hastings Center Report 32 (6):29-38.
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  4. The Atrocity Paradigm: A Theory of Evil.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):213-215.
  5.  3
    The Patient in the Family an Ethics of Medicine and Families.Hilde Lindemann Nelson, Hilde Lindemann & James Lindemann Nelson - 1995 - Routledge.
    The Patient in the Family diagnoses the ways in which the worlds of home and hospital misunderstand each other. The authors explore how medicine, through its new reproductive technologies, is altering the structure of families, how families can participate more fully in medical decision-making, and how to understand the impact on families when medical advances extend life but not vitality.
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  6.  68
    Rehabilitating Care.Hilde Lindemann Nelson & Alisa L. Carse - 1996 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 6 (1):19-35.
    : The feminist ethic of care has often been criticized for its inability to address four problems--the problem of exploitation as it threatens care givers, the problem of sustaining care-giver integrity, the dangers of conceiving the mother-child dyad normatively as a paradigm for human relationships, and the problem of securing social justice on a broad scale among relative strangers. We argue that there are resources within the ethic of care for addressing each of these problems, and we sketch strategies for (...)
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  7. Identity and Free Agency.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 2001 - In Peggy DesAutels & JoAnne Waugh (eds.), Feminists Doing Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield.
  8.  38
    Advance Care Planning Priorities for Ethical and Empirical Research.Joan M. Teno, Hilde Lindemann Nelson & Joanne Lynn - 1994 - Hastings Center Report 24 (6):32-36.
  9.  58
    Cutting Motherhood in Two: Some Suspicions Concerning Surrogacy.Hilde Lindemann Nelson & James Lindemann Nelson - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (3):85-94.
    Surrogate motherhood-at least if carefully structured to protect the interests of the women involved-seems defensible along standard liberal lines which place great stress on free agreements as moral bedrocks. But feminist theories have tended to be suspicious about the importance assigned to this notion by mainstream ethics, and in this paper, we develop implications of those suspicions for surrogacy. We argue that the practice is inconsistent with duties parents owe to children and that it compromises the freedom of surrogates to (...)
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  10.  7
    Feminist Bioethics: Where We've Been, Where We 'Re Going'.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 2000 - Metaphilosophy 31 (5):492-508.
  11. Fluid Families: The Role of Children in Custody Arrangements.Elise Le Robinson, Hilde Lindemann Nelson & James Lindemann Nelson - 1997 - In Hilde Lindemann (ed.), Feminism and Families. Routledge.
  12.  31
    Resistance and Insubordination.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1995 - Hypatia 10 (2):23 - 40.
    I introduce the notion of the counterstory: a story that contributes to the moral self-definition of its teller by undermining a dominant story, undoing it and retelling it in such a way as to invite new interpretations and conclusions. Counterstories can be told anywhere, but particularly when told within chosen communities, they permit their tellers to reenter, as full citizens, the communities of place whose goods have been only imperfectly available to its marginalized members.
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  13.  24
    The Architect and the Bee: Some Reflections on Postmortem Pregnancy.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1994 - Bioethics 8 (3):247–267.
    ABSTRACTDo physicians have a duty to sustain the pregnancies of women who die during the first or second trimester? Physicians cannot simply assume that the woman would have wished the pregnancy to continue, nor is it clear that the state has any interest in fetal life before viability. The conditions for beneficence‐based duties of fetal rescue will often be unmet, both because sustaining the pregnancy is not always a clear gain to the born child and because it may impose a (...)
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  14. Feminism and Families.Hilde Lindemann Nelson (ed.) - 1996 - Routledge.
    A ground-breaking volume of all new essays covering the conjunction of two topics--feminism and families--that, for all their centrality in our culture, have not been adequately examined in light of one another. While the family has suffered feminist neglect, most women _are_ in fact members of families, living their lives within the social context of families, even at a time when the concept of "family" has become bewilderingly unstable. The intersection of families and feminism is thus one in need of (...)
     
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  15.  1
    Meaning and Medicine: A Reader in the Philosophy of Health Care.James Lindemann Nelson & Hilde Lindemann Nelson (eds.) - 1999 - Routledge.
    Most available resources for teachers and students in biomedical ethics are based on a notion of medicine and of how to understand and illuminate its ethical problems that is at least two decades old. Meaning and Medicine dramatically expands the repertoire of resources for teachers and students of bioethics. In addition to providing fresh perspectives on both traditional and emerging questions in bioethics, this Reader focuses on questions in social philosophy, epistemology, and metaphysics as they are raised by developments in (...)
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  16.  6
    Preferences and Other Moral Sources.Hilde Lindemann Nelson & James Lindemann Nelson - 1994 - Hastings Center Report 24 (6):19-21.
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  17.  28
    Before He Wakes.Hilde Lindemann Nelson & Daniel Callahan - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (4):15-16.
  18.  5
    Guided by Intimates.James Lindemann Nelson & Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (5):14-15.
  19.  13
    Pictures of Persons and the Good of Hospice Care.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
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  20.  3
    Context: Backward, Sideways, and Forward.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1999 - HEC Forum 11 (1):16-26.
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  21.  79
    Recognition, Responsibility, and Rights: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory.Robin N. Fiore & Hilde Lindemann Nelson (eds.) - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This collection of papers by prominent feminist thinkers advances the positive feminist project of remapping the moral by developing theory that acknowledges the diversity of women.
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  22. At the Center.James Lindemann Nelson & Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (4).
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  23. Feminism and Families.Hilde Lindemann Nelson (ed.) - 1996 - Routledge.
    A ground-breaking volume of all new essays covering the conjunction of two topics--feminism and families--that, for all their centrality in our culture, have not been adequately examined in light of one another. While the family has suffered feminist neglect, most women _are_ in fact members of families, living their lives within the social context of families, even at a time when the concept of "family" has become bewilderingly unstable. The intersection of families and feminism is thus one in need of (...)
     
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  24. Injured Identities, Narrative Repair.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 2000 - Dissertation, Fordham University
    I defend the view that a person's identity is injured when a powerful social group views the members of her own, less powerful group as unworthy of full moral respect, and in consequence unjustly prevents her from occupying valuable social roles or entering into desirable relationships that are themselves identity constituting. We may call this harm deprivation of opportunity. Further, a person's identity is injured when she endorses, as a portion of her self-concept, a dominant group's dismissive or exploitative understanding (...)
     
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  25. The Patient and the Family.Hilde Lindemann Nelson, James Lindemann Nelson & Hugh LaFollettek - 1997 - Bioethics 11 (2):175-176.
     
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  26.  42
    Damaged Bodies, Damaged Identities.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 2004 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 11 (1):7-11.
    In this essay I examine Margaret Edson’s Pulitzer prizewinning play, Wit, to explore the numerous connections drawn there between damage to bodies and damage to identities. In the course of this exploration I aim to get clearer about the kinds of illness, injury, or medical interventions that damage patients’ identities; how the damage is inflicted; and what might be done to repair identities that have been damaged in these ways. I argue that just as bodily illness and injury can damage (...)
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  27.  22
    Feminism, Social Policy, and Long-Acting Contraception.Hilde Lindemann Nelson & James Lindemann Nelson - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (1):30-32.
  28.  86
    Sophie Doesn't: Families and Counterstories of Self-Trust.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (1):91 - 104.
    Girls learn the lesson of cognitive deference most clearly, perhaps, growing up in patriarchal families. Taught to discount their own judgments and to depend on those of the family's dominant men, they lose self-trust and cannot take themselves seriously as moral deliberators. I argue that through the telling of counterstories, which undermine normative stories of oppression, it is sometimes possible for women to reclaim these families as places where they have cognitive authority.
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  29.  22
    Book Review: Claudia Card. The Atrocity Paradigm: A Theory of Evil. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002. [REVIEW]Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):213-215.
  30.  19
    Book Review. [REVIEW]Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1995 - Journal of Value Inquiry 29 (4):112-116.
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  31.  7
    The Cost of "Informal" Care. [REVIEW]Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 2001 - Hastings Center Report 31 (4):47.
  32.  15
    A Companion to Feminist Philosophy.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1999 - International Philosophical Quarterly 39 (4):483-484.
  33.  9
    At the Center.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1991 - Hastings Center Report 21 (5).
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  34.  10
    Feminist Approaches to Bioethics: Theoretical Reflections and Practical Applications, by Rosemarie Tong.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (4):112.
  35.  40
    Feminists Doing Ethics.Peggy Desautels, Joanne Waugh, Margaret Urban Walker, Uma Narayan, Diana Tietjens Meyers & Hilde Lindemann Nelson (eds.) - 2001 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this collection, contributors refashion essays from the international conference on feminist ethics, Feminist Ethics Revisited, with an aim to critique social practice and develop an ethics of universal justice. The essays in this exciting volume explore the intricacies and impact of reasoned moral action, the virtues of character, and the empowering responsibility that morality generates. Feminists Doing Ethics brings to light concepts and ideas that are intended to extend our understanding of morality and of ourselves.
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  36.  22
    Dethroning Choice: Analogy, Personhood, and the New Reproductive Technologies.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (2):129-135.
    There is something about the debate over reproductive technologies of all kinds—from coerced use of Norplant to trait-selection technologies, to issues surrounding in vitro fertilization, to fetal tissue transplantation—that seems to invite dubious analogies. A Tennessee trial court termed Mary Sue and Junior Davis's frozen embryos “in vitro children” and applied a best-interests standard in awarding “custody” to Mary Sue Davis; the Warnock Committee drew an implicit analogy between human gametes and transplantable organs in its recommendation of a voluntary, nonprofit (...)
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  37.  14
    Knowledge at the Bedside: A Feminist View of What's Happening with This Patient.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1999 - In James Lindemann Nelson & JHilde Lindemann Nelson (eds.), Meaning and Medicine: A Reader in the Philosophy of Health Care. Routledge.
  38.  4
    Where Docs Draw the Line.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (5):3.
  39.  3
    Book Review: Claudia Card. The Atrocity Paradigm: A Theory of Evil. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002. [REVIEW]Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):213-215.
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  40.  3
    Paternal-Fetal Conflict.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1992 - Hastings Center Report 22 (2):3-3.
  41.  4
    The Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 2001 - International Philosophical Quarterly 41 (4):483-484.
  42.  5
    The Architect and the Bee: Some Reflections on Postmortem Pregnancy.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1994 - Bioethics 8 (3):247-267.
    ABSTRACTDo physicians have a duty to sustain the pregnancies of women who die during the first or second trimester? Physicians cannot simply assume that the woman would have wished the pregnancy to continue, nor is it clear that the state has any interest in fetal life before viability. The conditions for beneficence‐based duties of fetal rescue will often be unmet, both because sustaining the pregnancy is not always a clear gain to the born child and because it may impose a (...)
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  43.  1
    The Cost of "Informal" CareAlways on Call: When Illness Turns Families Into Caregivers.Hilde Lindemann Nelson & Carol Levine - 2001 - Hastings Center Report 31 (4):47.
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  44.  5
    Dethroning Choice: Analogy, Personhood, and the New Reproductive Technologies.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (2):129-135.
    There is something about the debate over reproductive technologies of all kinds—from coerced use of Norplant to trait-selection technologies, to issues surrounding in vitro fertilization, to fetal tissue transplantation—that seems to invite dubious analogies. A Tennessee trial court termed Mary Sue and Junior Davis's frozen embryos “in vitro children” and applied a best-interests standard in awarding “custody” to Mary Sue Davis; the Warnock Committee drew an implicit analogy between human gametes and transplantable organs in its recommendation of a voluntary, nonprofit (...)
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  45.  6
    From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice (Review).James Lindemann Nelson & Hilde Lindemann Nelson - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (2):70-72.