Results for 'Hillary S. Schaefer'

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  1. : Gaze fixation and the neural circuitry of face processing.Hillary S. Schaefer & Andrew L. Alexander R. Richard J. Davidson - unknown
    ai Diminished gaze fixation is one of the core features of autism and has been proposed to be associated with abnormalities in the neural circuitry of affect. We tested this hypothesis in two separate studies using eye tracking while measuring functional brain activity during facial discrimination tasks in individuals with autism and in typically developing individuals. Activation in the fusiform gyrus and amygdala was strongly and positively correlated with the time spent fixating the eyes in the autistic group in both (...)
     
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  2. Individual Differences in Amygdala and Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Activity are Associated with Evaluation Speed and Psychological Well-being.Corrina J. Frye, Hillary S. Schaefer & Andrew L. Alexander - unknown
    & Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined whether individual differences in amygdala activation in response to negative relative to neutral information are related to differences in the speed with which such information is evaluated, the extent to which such differences are associated with medial prefrontal cortex function, and their relationship with measures of trait anxiety and psychological well-being (PWB). Results indicated that faster judgments of negative relative to neutral information were associated with increased left and right amygdala activation. In (...)
     
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  3.  89
    Expanding Western Definitions of Shamanism: A Conversation with Stephan Beyer, Stanley Krippner, and Hillary S. Webb.Hillary S. Webb - 2013 - Anthropology of Consciousness 24 (1):57-75.
    Where has the Western attraction to the study and practice of shamanic techniques brought us? Where might it take us? In what ways have our Western biases and philosophical underpinnings influenced and changed how shamanism is practiced, both in the West and in the traditional cultures out of which they emerged? Is it time to stop using the umbrella term “shamanism” to refer to such diverse cross-cultural practices? What are our responsibilities, both as researchers and as spiritual seekers? In this (...)
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  4. Psychological response patterning in emotion: implications for affective computing. Kreibig, S., Schaefer, G., Brosch & T. - 2010 - In Klaus R. Scherer, Tanja Bänziger & Etienne Roesch (eds.), A Blueprint for Affective Computing: A Sourcebook and Manual. Oxford University Press.
     
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  5.  5
    Nineteenth Century Modern, the Functional Tradition in Victorian Design.S. Omoto & Herwin Schaefer - 1971 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 29 (4):566.
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  6. Doing Consciousness Studies at Goddard College.Hillary S. Webb & Francis X. Charet - 2007 - Anthropology of Consciousness 18 (1):51-64.
    In the first part of this article we briefly describe the design and development of a Consciousness Studies concentration at Goddard College, a student centered, progressive educational institution in the northeastern United States. We emphasize the tensions we experienced between different orientations in Consciousness Studies and especially the one related to the scientific and transpersonal ends of the spectrum of consciousness. In the second part, we relate the scientific‐transpersonal issue that we experienced at Goddard to the broader theory and practice (...)
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  7.  26
    The Use of Peyote as Treatment for Alcoholism within the NAC Community: Reflections on a Study.Hillary S. Webb - 2011 - Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (2):234-244.
    What are the ethical obligations of a researcher who wishes to study another culture's ceremonial practices, in particular those of the Native American Church (NAC)? What promise do peyote and the NAC peyote ceremony show for the treatment of alcoholism amongst NAC members? How does one approach the philosophical issues regarding “consciousness” within the context of such a study? In this interview, Dr. John Halpern, M.D., discusses how the fields of medicine and anthropology converged and informed one another over the (...)
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  8.  25
    :Intelligence in Nature: An Inquiry into Knowledge.Hillary S. Webb - 2007 - Anthropology of Consciousness 18 (1):116-118.
  9.  50
    Book review: Altered states of consciousness and psi: An historical survey and research prospectus (parapsychological monograph series no. 18). Edward F. Kelly and Rafael G. Locke. [REVIEW]Hillary S. Webb - 2010 - Anthropology of Consciousness 21 (2):224-226.
  10.  21
    Communitas: The Anthropology of Collective Joy, Edith Turner. New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2012. 258 pp. ISBN 978‐0‐230‐33908‐8, $28. [REVIEW]Hillary S. Webb - 2013 - Anthropology of Consciousness 24 (1):82-84.
  11.  6
    Prime editing in plants and mammalian cells: Mechanism, achievements, limitations, and future prospects.V. Edwin Hillary & S. Antony Ceasar - 2022 - Bioessays 44 (9):2200032.
    Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR‐associated protein (CRISPR/Cas) system has revolutionized genetic research in the life sciences. Four classes of CRISPR/Cas‐derived genome editing agents, such as nuclease, base editor, recombinase, and prime editor have been introduced for engineering the genomes of diverse organisms. The recently introduced prime editing system offers precise editing without many off‐target effects than traditional CRISPR‐based systems. Many researchers have successfully applied this gene‐editing toolbox in diverse systems for various genome‐editing applications. This review presents the mechanism (...)
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  12.  13
    Weaning and the nature of early childhood interactions among bofi foragers in central Africa.Hillary N. Fouts, Barry S. Hewlett & Michael E. Lamb - 2001 - Human Nature 12 (1):27-46.
    Western scholarly literature suggests that (1) weaning is initiated by mothers; (2) weaning takes place within a few days once mothers decide to stop nursing; (3) mothers employ specific techniques to terminate nursing; (4) semi-solid foods (gruels and mashed foods) are essential when weaning; (5) weaning is traumatic for children (it leads to temper tantrums, aggression, etc.); (6) developmental stages in relationships with mothers and others can be demarcated by weaning; and (7) weaning is a process that involves mothers and (...)
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  13.  36
    Infant crying in hunter-Gatherer cultures.Hillary N. Fouts, Michael E. Lamb & Barry S. Hewlett - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):462-463.
    By synthesizing evolutionary, attachment, and acoustic perspectives, Soltis has provided an innovative model of infant cry acoustics and parental responsiveness. We question some of his hypotheses, however, because of the limited extant data on infant crying among hunter-gatherers. We also question Soltis' distinction between manipulative and honest signaling based upon recent contributions from attachment theory.
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  14.  14
    Parenting and Environmental Risk.Hillary N. Fouts & Lisa S. Silverman - 2015 - Human Nature 26 (1):73-88.
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  15.  22
    Affect and the resolution of cognitive control dilemmas.Jeremy R. Gray, Alexandre Schaefer, Todd S. Braver & Steven B. Most - 2005 - In Barr (ed.), Emotion and Consciousness. Guilford Press.
  16.  33
    Affect and non-uniform characteristics of predictive processing in musical behaviour.Rebecca S. Schaefer, Katie Overy & Peter Nelson - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):226-227.
    The important roles of prediction and prior experience are well established in music research and fit well with Clark's concept of unified perception, cognition, and action arising from hierarchical, bidirectional predictive processing. However, in order to fully account for human musical intelligence, Clark needs to further consider the powerful and variable role of affect in relation to prediction error.
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  17. Affect and the resolution of cognitive control dilemmas.R. Gray Jeremy, Tood Alexandre Schaefer, Steven S. Braver & B. Most - 2005 - In Lisa Feldman Barrett, Paula M. Niedenthal & Piotr Winkielman (eds.), Emotion and Consciousness. Guilford Press.
  18. Music in the brain: imagery and memory.Rebecca S. Schaefer - 2017 - In Richard Ashley & Renee Timmers (eds.), The Routledge companion to music cognition. Routledge.
     
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  19.  26
    Dynamic network participation of functional connectivity hubs assessed by resting-state fMRI.Alexander Schaefer, Daniel S. Margulies, Gabriele Lohmann, Krzysztof J. Gorgolewski, Jonathan Smallwood, Stefan J. Kiebel & Arno Villringer - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  20. An ethical framework for global vaccine allocation.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Govind Persad, Adam Kern, Allen E. Buchanan, Cecile Fabre, Daniel Halliday, Joseph Heath, Lisa M. Herzog, R. J. Leland, Ephrem T. Lemango, Florencia Luna, Matthew McCoy, Ole F. Norheim, Trygve Ottersen, G. Owen Schaefer, Kok-Chor Tan, Christopher Heath Wellman, Jonathan Wolff & Henry S. Richardson - 2020 - Science 1:DOI: 10.1126/science.abe2803.
    In this article, we propose the Fair Priority Model for COVID-19 vaccine distribution, and emphasize three fundamental values we believe should be considered when distributing a COVID-19 vaccine among countries: Benefiting people and limiting harm, prioritizing the disadvantaged, and equal moral concern for all individuals. The Priority Model addresses these values by focusing on mitigating three types of harms caused by COVID-19: death and permanent organ damage, indirect health consequences, such as health care system strain and stress, as well as (...)
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  21. Lending a hand: Social regulation of the neural response to threat.Richard J. Davidson, Coan, A. J., Schaefer & S. H. - manuscript
  22.  28
    “Calling Out” in Class: Degrees of Candor in Addressing Social Injustices in Racially Homogenous and Heterogeneous U.S. History Classrooms.Hillary Parkhouse & Virginia R. Massaro - 2019 - Journal of Social Studies Research 43 (1):17-31.
    Teaching for social justice requires an ability to address sensitive issues such as racism and sexism so that students can gain critical consciousness of these pervasive social realities. However, the empirical literature thus far provides minimal exploration of the factors teachers consider in deciding how to address these issues. This study explores this question through ethnographic case studies of two urban, 11th grade U.S. History classrooms. Differing classroom racial demographics and teacher instructional goals resulted in two distinct pedagogical approaches to (...)
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  23.  11
    Moving to Music: Effects of Heard and Imagined Musical Cues on Movement-Related Brain Activity.Rebecca S. Schaefer, Alexa M. Morcom, Neil Roberts & Katie Overy - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  24.  44
    The One-System View and Dworkin’s Anti-Archimedean Eliminativism.Hillary Nye - 2021 - Law and Philosophy 40 (3):247-276.
    Many of Dworkin’s interlocutors saw his ‘one-system view’, according to which law is a branch of morality, as a radical shift. I argue that it is better seen as a different way of expressing his longstanding view that legal theory is an inherently normative endeavor. Dworkin emphasizes that fact and value are separate domains, and one cannot ground claims of one sort in the other domain. On this view, legal philosophy can only answer questions from within either domain. We cannot (...)
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  25.  34
    Finnis’s divided view of law: problems for adjudicative theory.Hillary Nye - 2020 - Jurisprudence 11 (4):503-529.
    Finnis’s theory of law distinguishes between law in the focal sense and law in the legal sense. Law in the focal sense is law that promotes the common good. Citizens may appeal to considerations of...
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  26.  10
    The greening imaginary: urbanized nature in Germany’s Ruhr region.Hillary Angelo - 2019 - Theory and Society 48 (5):645-669.
    This article provides a sociological explanation for urban “greening,” the normative practice of using everyday signifiers of nature to fix problems with urbanism. Although greening is commonly understood as a reaction against the pathologies of the industrial metropolis, such explanations cannot account for greening’s recurrence across varied social and historical contexts. Through a study of greening in Germany’s Ruhr region, a polycentric urban region that has repeatedly greened in the absence of a traditional city, I argue that greening is made (...)
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  27.  23
    Society & Animals Journal of Human-Animal Studies.Hillary Twining, Arnold Arluke & Gary Patronek - 2000 - Society and Animals 8 (1):25-52.
    Ethnographic interviews were conducted with 28 pit bull "owners" to explore the sociological experience of having a dog with a negative image. Results indicate that the vast majority of respondents felt that these dogs were stigmatized because of their breed. Respondents made this conclusion because friends, family, and strangers were apprehensive in the presence of their dogs and because they made accusations about the breed's viciousness and lack of predictability. In the face of this stigma, respondents resorted to using a (...)
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  28.  11
    Linda Zabzebski's Virtues of the Mind.Hillary Kornblight - 2000 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (1):197.
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  29. What are the obligations of pharmaceutical companies in a global health emergency?Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Allen Buchanan, Shuk Ying Chan, Cécile Fabre, Daniel Halliday, Joseph Heath, Lisa Herzog, R. J. Leland, Matthew S. McCoy, Ole F. Norheim, Carla Saenz, G. Owen Schaefer, Kok-Chor Tan, Christopher Heath Wellman, Jonathan Wolff & Govind Persad - 2021 - Lancet 398 (10304):1015.
    All parties involved in researching, developing, manufacturing, and distributing COVID-19 vaccines need guidance on their ethical obligations. We focus on pharmaceutical companies' obligations because their capacities to research, develop, manufacture, and distribute vaccines make them uniquely placed for stemming the pandemic. We argue that an ethical approach to COVID-19 vaccine production and distribution should satisfy four uncontroversial principles: optimising vaccine production, including development, testing, and manufacturing; fair distribution; sustainability; and accountability. All parties' obligations should be coordinated and mutually consistent. For (...)
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  30.  16
    Editor's Note: Call for Managing Editor, Anthropology of Consciousness.Hillary Webb - 2011 - Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (2):102-102.
  31.  13
    History of American Political Thought.John Agresto, John E. Alvis, Donald R. Brand, Paul O. Carrese, Laurence D. Cooper, Murray Dry, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Thomas S. Engeman, Christopher Flannery, Steven Forde, David Fott, David F. Forte, Matthew J. Franck, Bryan-Paul Frost, David Foster, Peter B. Josephson, Steven Kautz, John Koritansky, Peter Augustine Lawler, Howard L. Lubert, Harvey C. Mansfield, Jonathan Marks, Sean Mattie, James McClellan, Lucas E. Morel, Peter C. Meyers, Ronald J. Pestritto, Lance Robinson, Michael J. Rosano, Ralph A. Rossum, Richard S. Ruderman, Richard Samuelson, David Lewis Schaefer, Peter Schotten, Peter W. Schramm, Kimberly C. Shankman, James R. Stoner, Natalie Taylor, Aristide Tessitore, William Thomas, Daryl McGowan Tress, David Tucker, Eduardo A. Velásquez, Karl-Friedrich Walling, Bradley C. S. Watson, Melissa S. Williams, Delba Winthrop, Jean M. Yarbrough & Michael Zuckert - 2003 - Lexington Books.
    This book is a collection of secondary essays on America's most important philosophic thinkers—statesmen, judges, writers, educators, and activists—from the colonial period to the present. Each essay is a comprehensive introduction to the thought of a noted American on the fundamental meaning of the American regime.
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  32.  45
    Infallibility and Intentionality: Franz Brentano's Diagnosis of German Catholicism.Richard Schaefer - 2007 - Journal of the History of Ideas 68 (3):477-499.
    This article explores Franz Brentano's opposition to papal infallibility, and sets this in the context of his development as a Catholic scholar. An active participant in the Catholic revival of the nineteenth century, Brentano contributed to the emergence of neoscholasticism through his philosophical rehabilitation of Aristotle. Brentano ultimately left the Church however as the result of intensive scrutiny of his faith occasioned by his analysis of infallibility. This article explores this crisis of faith by analyzing, for the first time, Brentano's (...)
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  33.  36
    On the Ethics of Vaccine Nationalism: The Case for the Fair Priority for Residents Framework.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Allen Buchanan, Shuk Ying Chan, Cécile Fabre, Daniel Halliday, R. J. Leland, Florencia Luna, Matthew S. McCoy, Ole F. Norheim, G. Owen Schaefer, Kok-Chor Tan & Christopher Heath Wellman - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (4):543-562.
    COVID-19 vaccines are likely to be scarce for years to come. Many countries, from India to the U.K., have demonstrated vaccine nationalism. What are the ethical limits to this vaccine nationalism? Neither extreme nationalism nor extreme cosmopolitanism is ethically justifiable. Instead, we propose the fair priority for residents framework, in which governments can retain COVID-19 vaccine doses for their residents only to the extent that they are needed to maintain a noncrisis level of mortality while they are implementing reasonable public (...)
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  34.  8
    “Help! I Need Somebody”: Music as a Global Resource for Obtaining Wellbeing Goals in Times of Crisis.Roni Granot, Daniel H. Spitz, Boaz R. Cherki, Psyche Loui, Renee Timmers, Rebecca S. Schaefer, Jonna K. Vuoskoski, Ruth-Nayibe Cárdenas-Soler, João F. Soares-Quadros, Shen Li, Carlotta Lega, Stefania La Rocca, Isabel Cecilia Martínez, Matías Tanco, María Marchiano, Pastora Martínez-Castilla, Gabriela Pérez-Acosta, José Darío Martínez-Ezquerro, Isabel M. Gutiérrez-Blasco, Lily Jiménez-Dabdoub, Marijn Coers, John Melvin Treider, David M. Greenberg & Salomon Israel - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Music can reduce stress and anxiety, enhance positive mood, and facilitate social bonding. However, little is known about the role of music and related personal or cultural variables in maintaining wellbeing during times of stress and social isolation as imposed by the COVID-19 crisis. In an online questionnaire, administered in 11 countries, participants rated the relevance of wellbeing goals during the pandemic, and the effectiveness of different activities in obtaining these goals. Music was found to be the most effective activity (...)
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  35.  96
    Risk Disclosure and the Recruitment of Oocyte Donors: Are Advertisers Telling the Full Story?Hillary B. Alberta, Roberta M. Berry & Aaron D. Levine - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (2):232-243.
    This study analyzes 435 oocyte donor recruitment advertisements to assess whether entities recruiting donors of oocytes to be used for in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures include a disclosure of risks associated with the donation process in their advertisements. Such disclosure is required by the self-regulatory guidelines of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) and by law in California for advertisements placed in the state. We find very low rates of risk disclosure across entity types and regulatory regimes, although risk (...)
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  36.  23
    Healthcare Access for the Deaf in Singapore: Overcoming Communication Barriers.Hillary Chua - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (4):377-390.
    Good communication between healthcare providers and patients is vital to effective healthcare. In order to understand patients’ complaints, make accurate diagnoses, obtain informed consent and explain treatment regimens, clinicians must communicate well with their patients. This can be challenging when treating patients from unfamiliar cultural backgrounds, such as the Deaf. Not only are they a linguistic and cultural minority, they are also members of the world’s largest and oft-forgotten minority group: the disability community. Under Article 25 of the United Nations (...)
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  37. Autonomy and Enhancement.G. Owen Schaefer, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu - 2013 - Neuroethics 7 (2):123-136.
    Some have objected to human enhancement on the grounds that it violates the autonomy of the enhanced. These objections, however, overlook the interesting possibility that autonomy itself could be enhanced. How, exactly, to enhance autonomy is a difficult problem due to the numerous and diverse accounts of autonomy in the literature. Existing accounts of autonomy enhancement rely on narrow and controversial conceptions of autonomy. However, we identify one feature of autonomy common to many mainstream accounts: reasoning ability. Autonomy can then (...)
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  38. Direct vs. Indirect Moral Enhancement.G. Owen Schaefer - 2015 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 25 (3):261-289.
    Moral enhancement is an ostensibly laudable project. Who wouldn’t want people to become more moral? Still, the project’s approach is crucial. We can distinguish between two approaches for moral enhancement: direct and indirect. Direct moral enhancements aim at bringing about particular ideas, motives or behaviors. Indirect moral enhancements, by contrast, aim at making people more reliably produce the morally correct ideas, motives or behaviors without committing to the content of those ideas, motives and/or actions. I will argue, on Millian grounds, (...)
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  39.  60
    Brandom’s Account of Reasoning.Reiner Schaefer - 2016 - Journal of Philosophical Research 41:129-150.
    In most everyday instances of reasoning, reasoners can gain, lose, and reacquire entitlement to (or justification for) a possible commitment (or belief) as a result of their consecutively acquiring new commitments. For example, we might initially conclude that ‘Tweety can fly’ from ‘Tweety is a bird,’ but later have to reject this conclusion as a result of our coming to learn that Tweety is a penguin. We could, even later, reacquire entitlement to ‘Tweety can fly’ if we became committed (and (...)
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  40.  25
    Exit & isolation: Rousseau’s state of nature.Mario I. Juarez-Garcia & Alexander Schaefer - 2022 - Synthese 200 (3):1-21.
    Game theory has proven useful in clarifying Hobbes’s argument that the state of nature will inevitably devolve into a state of war. Mathematically-leaning philosophers, however, have paid little attention to Rousseau’s depiction of the state of nature as a peaceful, asocial state of solitary wanderers. This paper articulates Rousseau’s critique of Hobbes in formal terms, which pinpoints two crucial issues in Hobbes’s account: the lack of an exit option and an unrealistic depiction of human nature. Building upon recent game-theoretic treatments (...)
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  41.  14
    Unravelling into war: trust and social preferences in Hobbes’s state of nature.Alexander Schaefer & Jin-Yeong Sohn - 2022 - Economics and Philosophy 38 (2):171-205.
    According to Hobbes, individuals care about their relative standing in a way that shapes their social interactions. To model this aspect of Hobbesian psychology, this paper supposes that agents have social preferences, that is, preferences about their comparative resource holdings. Introducing uncertainty regarding the social preferences of others unleashes a process of trust-unravelling, ultimately leading to Hobbes’s ‘state of war’. This Trust-unravelling Model incorporates important features of Hobbes’s argument that past models ignore.
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  42.  12
    Reasoning About Want.Hillary Harner & Sangeet Khemlani - 2022 - Cognitive Science 46 (9):e13170.
    No present theory explains the inferences people draw about the real world when reasoning about “bouletic” relations, that is, predicates that express desires, such aswantin “Lee wants to be in love”. Linguistic accounts ofwantdefine it in terms of a relation to a desirer's beliefs, and how its complement is deemed desirable. In contrast, we describe a new model‐based theory that posits that by default, desire predicates such aswantcontrast desires against facts. In particular,A wants Pimplies by default thatPis not the case, (...)
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  43. Can reproductive genetic manipulation save lives?G. Owen Schaefer - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy (3):381-386.
    It has recently been argued that reproductive genetic manipulation technologies like mitochondrial replacement and germline CRISPR modifications cannot be said to save anyone’s life because, counterfactually, no one would suffer more or die sooner absent the intervention. The present article argues that, on the contrary, reproductive genetic manipulations may be life-saving (and, from this, have therapeutic value) under an appropriate population health perspective. As such, popular reports of reproductive genetic manipulations potentially saving lives or preventing disease are not necessarily mistaken, (...)
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  44.  7
    Research in the USA on COVID-19’s long-term effects: measures needed to ensure black, indigenous and Latinx communities are not left behind.Michelle Medeiros, Hillary Anne Edwards & Claudia Rose Baquet - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (2):87-91.
    The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to expose underlying inequities in healthcare for black, indigenous and Latinx communities in the USA. The gaps in equitable care for communities of colour transcend the diagnosis, treatment and vaccinations related to COVID-19. We are experiencing a continued gap across racial and socioeconomic lines for those who suffer prolonged effects of COVID-19, also known as ‘Long COVID-19’. What we know about the treatment for Long COVID-19 so far is that it is complex, requires a multidisciplinary (...)
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  45.  42
    Medial Prefrontal and Anterior Insular Connectivity in Early Schizophrenia and Major Depressive Disorder: A Resting Functional MRI Evaluation of Large-Scale Brain Network Models.Jacob Penner, Kristen A. Ford, Reggie Taylor, Betsy Schaefer, Jean Théberge, Richard W. J. Neufeld, Elizabeth A. Osuch, Ravi S. Menon, Nagalingam Rajakumar, John M. Allman & Peter C. Williamson - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  46.  44
    Hillary's Heels: Examining Gender and Power through Semiotics.Amy Wu - 2014 - Semiotics:473-490.
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  47.  57
    Bird in hand: How experience makes nature. [REVIEW]Hillary Angelo - 2013 - Theory and Society 42 (4):351-368.
    It is almost a truism that nature is social, but by what means is nature made social at the level of the interactional encounter? While the transformation of society/nature relationships is often approached through the problematic of distance, and at the scale of macro-historical transformation, this article uses a conflict between American birdwatchers and ornithologists over scientific “collecting” (literally, the killing of birds) to examine the processes through which individuals come to know nature, and come to know it so differently. (...)
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  48. Code-consistent ethics review: defence of a hybrid account.G. Owen Schaefer - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (7):494-495.
    It is generally unquestioned that human subjects research review boards should assess the ethical acceptability of protocols. It says so right on the tin, after all: they are explicitly called research ethics committees in the UK. But it is precisely those sorts of unchallenged assumptions that should, from time to time, be assessed and critiqued, in case they are in fact unfounded. John Stuart Mill's objection to suppressers of dissent is instructive here: “If the opinion is right, they are deprived (...)
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  49.  29
    A Defence of AI-Functionalism Against Brandom’s Arguments from Holism and the Frame Problem.Reiner Schaefer - 2011 - Dialogue 50 (4):741-750.
    ABSTRACT: Brandom argues that functionalism must ultimately fail because it will not be able to explain how we can holistically update our beliefs solely in terms of abilities possessed by non-linguistic things. In this paper I respond to this argument by arguing that non-linguistic animals encounter and overcome an analogous sort of holistic updating problem. I will also try to demystify holism and de-intellectualize language use/reasoning.
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  50. Procedural Moral Enhancement.G. Owen Schaefer & Julian Savulescu - 2016 - Neuroethics 12 (1):73-84.
    While philosophers are often concerned with the conditions for moral knowledge or justification, in practice something arguably less demanding is just as, if not more, important – reliably making correct moral judgments. Judges and juries should hand down fair sentences, government officials should decide on just laws, members of ethics committees should make sound recommendations, and so on. We want such agents, more often than not and as often as possible, to make the right decisions. The purpose of this paper (...)
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