Results for 'Historical science'

999 found
Order:
See also
  1.  45
    Narratives, Mechanisms and Progress in Historical Science.Adrian Mitchell Currie - 2014 - Synthese 191 (6):1-21.
    Geologists, Paleontologists and other historical scientists are frequently concerned with narrative explanations targeting single cases. I show that two distinct explanatory strategies are employed in narratives, simple and complex. A simple narrative has minimal causal detail and is embedded in a regularity, whereas a complex narrative is more detailed and not embedded. The distinction is illustrated through two case studies: the ‘snowball earth’ explanation of Neoproterozoic glaciation and recent attempts to explain gigantism in Sauropods. This distinction is revelatory of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  2.  48
    Making Prehistory: Historical Science and the Scientific Realism Debate.Derek Turner - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Scientists often make surprising claims about things that no one can observe. In physics, chemistry, and molecular biology, scientists can at least experiment on those unobservable entities, but what about researchers in fields such as paleobiology and geology who study prehistory, where no such experimentation is possible? Do scientists discover facts about the distant past or do they, in some sense, make prehistory? In this book Derek Turner argues that this problem has surprising and important consequences for the scientific realism (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  3. Methodological and Epistemic Differences Between Historical Science and Experimental Science.Carol E. Cleland - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 69 (3):447-451.
    Experimental research is commonly held up as the paradigm of "good" science. Although experiment plays many roles in science, its classical role is testing hypotheses in controlled laboratory settings. Historical science is sometimes held to be inferior on the grounds that its hypothesis cannot be tested by controlled laboratory experiments. Using contemporary examples from diverse scientific disciplines, this paper explores differences in practice between historical and experimental research vis-à-vis the testing of hypotheses. It rejects the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  4.  2
    Economics as a Historical Science.Herbert Simon - 1998 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 13 (2):241-260.
    As science deals with invariants and history with dated events, the phrase “historical science” might be thought to be an oxymoron. However, the prevalence in the natural sciences and economics of differential equations filled with time derivatives should persuade us of the legitimacy of joining history with science. The combination can, in fact, take several forms. This paper examines some of the ways inwhich history and economics can be fashioned into economic history, and the reasons why (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Nature of Evolutionary Biology: At the Borderlands Between Historical and Experimental Science.Massimo Pigliucci - 2013 - In Kostas Kampourakis (ed.), The Philosophy of Biology: A Companion for Educators. Springer.
    The scientific status of evolutionary theory seems to be more or less perennially under question. I am not referring here (just) to the silliness of young Earth creation- ism (Pigliucci 2002; Boudry and Braeckman 2010), or even of the barely more intel- lectually sophisticated so-called Intelligent Design theory (Recker 2010; Brigandt this volume), but rather to discussions among scientists and philosophers of science concerning the epistemic status of evolutionary theory (Sober 2010). As we shall see in what follows, this (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  32
    Historical Science, Over- and Underdetermined: A Study of Darwin's Inference of Origins.A. Tucker - 2011 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (4):805-829.
    The epistemology of the historical sciences has been debated recently. Cleland argued that the effects of the past overdetermine it. Turner argued that the past is underdetermined by its effects because of the decay of information from the past. I argue that the extent of over- and underdetermination cannot be approximated by philosophical inquiry. It is an empirical question that each historical science attempts to answer. Philosophers should examine how paradigmatic cases of historical science handled (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  7.  17
    The Past Vs. The Tiny: Historical Science and the Abductive Arguments for Realism.Derek D. Turner - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (1):1-17.
    Scientific realism is fundamentally a view about unobservable things, events, processes, and so on, but things can be unobservable either because they are tiny or because they are past. The familiar abductive arguments for scientific realism lend more justification to scientific realism about the tiny than to realism about the past. This paper examines both the “basic” abductive arguments for realism advanced by philosophers such as Ian Hacking and Michael Devitt, as well as Richard Boyd’s version of the inference to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  8.  17
    The Electrons of the Dinosaurs and the Center of the Earth: Comments on D.D. Turner's 'The Past Vs. The Tiny: Historical Science and the Abductive Arguments for Realism'. [REVIEW]Christián C. Carman - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (1):171-173.
    Turner [The past vs. the tiny: Historical science and the abductive arguments for realism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 35A 1] claims that the arguments in favor of realism do not support with the same force both classes of realism, since they supply stronger reasons for experimental realism than for historical realism. I would like to make two comments, which should be seen as amplifications inspired by his proposal, rather than as a criticism. First, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  54
    Historical Science, Experimental Science, and the Scientific Method.Carol Cleland - manuscript
    Many scientists believe that there is a uniform, interdisciplinary method for the prac- tice of good science. The paradigmatic examples, however, are drawn from classical ex- perimental science. Insofar as historical hypotheses cannot be tested in controlled labo- ratory settings, historical research is sometimes said to be inferior to experimental research. Using examples from diverse historical disciplines, this paper demonstrates that such claims are misguided. First, the reputed superiority of experimental research is based upon accounts (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  10.  45
    Economics as a Historical Science.Herbert Simon - 1998 - Theoria 13 (2):241-260.
    As science deals with invariants and history with dated events, the phrase “historical science” might be thought to be an oxymoron. However, the prevalence in the natural sciences and economics of differential equations filled with time derivatives should persuade us of the legitimacy of joining history with science. The combination can, in fact, take several forms. This paper examines some of the ways inwhich history and economics can be fashioned into economic history, and the reasons why (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  18
    The 'Historical-Investigative' Approach to Teaching Science.Nahum Kipnis - 1996 - Science & Education 5 (3):277-292.
    The paper describes the author's experience in using the history of science in teaching physics to science teachers. lt was found that history becomes more useful to teachers when explicitly combined with 'investigative' experimentation, which, in turn. can benefit from various uses of the history of science.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  32
    Mathematical Representations in Science: A Cognitive–Historical Case History.Ryan D. Tweney - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (4):758-776.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  13. Collingwood and Anthropology as a Historical Science.D. Boucher - 2002 - History of Political Thought 23 (2):303-332.
    This paper explores R.G. Collingwood's argument that a new type of archaeology, taking fairy tales as its subject matter, is capable of expanding our historical knowledge of cultural practices. I suggest that it is interesting from the point of view of current discussions about cosmopolitanism and communitarianism and also for understanding past practices, such as magic, without having to attribute failure of reasoning or a breakdown in mentality to the participants, as Le Roy Ladurie does. Collingwood maintains that the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Book Review:Historical Roots of Cognitive Science: The Rise of a Cognitive Theory of Perception From Antiquity to the Nineteenth Century Theo C. Meyering. [REVIEW]Gary Hatfield - 1993 - Philosophy of Science 60 (4):662-666.
    Review of THEO C. MEYERING, Historical Roots of Cognitive Science : The Rise of a Cognitive Theory of Perception from Antiquity to the Nineteenth Century. Boston: Kluwer, xix + 250 pp. $69.00. Examines the author's interpretation of Aristotelian theories of perceptual cognition, early modern theories, and Helmholtz's theory.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  15.  37
    History and Philosophy of Science in Japanese Education: A Historical Overview.Yuko Murakami & Manabu Sumida - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 2217-2245.
    This article describes the historical development of HPS/NOS mainly in higher education. Because the establishment of universities in Japan in late-nineteenth century was a reaction against Western imperialism, higher education aimed to cultivate scientists and engineers with an emphasis on practical applications. This direction in higher science and engineering education continues into the present. It has conditioned elementary and secondary education via university entrance examinations, where no questions on NOS appear. Hence, HPS research and education has developed in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  69
    Local Underdetermination in Historical Science.Derek Turner - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (1):209-230.
  17. A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Science.John Losee - 1972 - Oxford University Press.
    This new edition brings up to date this accessible study of the philosophy of science. Since the time of Plato and Aristotle, scientists and philosophers have raised questions about the proper evaluation of scientific interpretations. A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Science is an exposition of differing viewpoints on issues such as the distinction between scientific inquiry and other types of interpretation, the relationship between theories and observation reports; the evaluation of competing theories; and the nature (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  18.  72
    The Artful Mind Meets Art History: Toward a Psycho-Historical Framework for the Science of Art Appreciation.Nicolas J. Bullot & Rolf Reber - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):123-180.
    Research seeking a scientific foundation for the theory of art appreciation has raised controversies at the intersection of the social and cognitive sciences. Though equally relevant to a scientific inquiry into art appreciation, psychological and historical approaches to art developed independently and lack a common core of theoretical principles. Historicists argue that psychological and brain sciences ignore the fact that artworks are artifacts produced and appreciated in the context of unique historical situations and artistic intentions. After revealing flaws (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  19. The Subject of History: Historical Subjectivity and Historical Science.Ericka Tucker - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):205-229.
    In this paper, I show how the phenomenological and hermeneutic traditions and method converge on their treatment of the historical subject. Thinkers from both traditions claim that subjectivity is shaped by a historical worldview. Each tradition provides an account of how these worldviews are shaped, and thus how essentially historical subjective experience is molded. I argue that both traditions, although offering helpful ways of understanding the way history shapes subjectivity, go too far in their epistemic claims for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  90
    Reductionism in a Historical Science.Alex Rosenberg - 2001 - Philosophy of Science 68 (2):135-163.
    Reductionism is a metaphysical thesis, a claim about explanations, and a research program. The metaphysical thesis reductionists advance (and antireductionists accept) is that all facts, including all biological facts, are fixed by the physical and chemical facts; there are no non-physical events, states, or processes, and so biological events, states and processes are “nothing but” physical ones. The research program can be framed as a methodological prescription which follows from the claim about explanations. Antireductionism does not dispute reductionism’s metaphysical claim, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  21.  98
    Prediction and Explanation in Historical Natural Science.C. E. Cleland - 2011 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (3):551-582.
    In earlier work ( Cleland [2001] , [2002]), I sketched an account of the structure and justification of ‘prototypical’ historical natural science that distinguishes it from ‘classical’ experimental science. This article expands upon this work, focusing upon the close connection between explanation and justification in the historical natural sciences. I argue that confirmation and disconfirmation in these fields depends primarily upon the explanatory (versus predictive or retrodictive) success or failure of hypotheses vis-à-vis empirical evidence. The account (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  22.  58
    The Limits of Concept Formation in Natural Science: A Logical Introduction to the Historical Sciences.Heinrich Rickert - 1986 - Cambridge University Press.
    Heinrich Rickert (1863-1936) was One of the leading neo-Kantian philosophers in Germany and a crucial figure in the discussions of the foundations of the social sciences in the first quarter of the twentieth century. His views were extremely influential, most significantly on Max Weber. The Limits of Concept Formation in Natural Science is Rickert's most important work, and it is here translated into English for the first time. It presents his systematic theory of knowledge and philosophy of science, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  23.  32
    Particles and Waves: Historical Essays in the Philosophy of Science.Peter Achinstein - 1991 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume brings together eleven essays by the distinguished philosopher of science, Peter Achinstein. The unifying theme is the nature of the philosophical problems surrounding the postulation of unobservable entities such as light waves, molecules, and electrons. How, if at all, is it possible to confirm scientific hypotheses about "unobservables"? Achinstein examines this question as it arose in actual scientific practice in three nineteenth-century episodes: the debate between particle and wave theorists of light, Maxwell's kinetic theory of gases, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  24.  37
    Art and Science: A Philosophical Sketch of Their Historical Complexity and Codependence.Nicolas J. Bullot, William P. Seeley & Stephen Davies - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (4):453-463.
    To analyze the relations between art and science, philosophers and historians have developed different lines of inquiry. A first type of inquiry considers how artistic and scientific practices have interacted over human history. Another project aims to determine the contributions that scientific research can make to our understanding of art, including the contributions that cognitive science can make to philosophical questions about the nature of art. We rely on contributions made to these projects in order to demonstrate that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  21
    Geology as an Historical Science: Its Perception Within Science and the Education System.Jeff Dodick & Nir Orion - 2003 - Science & Education 12 (2):197-211.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26.  9
    Is Cultural-Historical Activity Theory Threatened to Fall Short of its Own Principles and Possibilities as a Dialectical Social Science?Ines Langemeyer & Wolf-Michael Roth - 2006 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 8 (2):20-42.
    In recent years, many researchers engaged in diverse areas and approaches of “cultural-historical activity theory” (CHAT) realized an increasing international interest in Lev S. Vygotsky’s, A. N. Leont’ev’s, and A. Luria’s work and its continuations. Not so long ago, Yrjö Engeström noted that the activity approach was still “the best-held secret of academia” (p. 64) and highlighted the “impressive dimension of theorizing behind” it. Certainly, this remark reflects a time when CHAT was off the beaten tracks. But if this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27.  36
    Wundt, Vygotsky and Bandura: A Cultural-Historical Science of Consciousness in Three Acts.Michel Ferrari, David K. Robinson & Anton Yasnitsky - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):95-118.
    This article looks at three historical efforts to coordinate the scientific study of biological and cultural aspects of human consciousness into a single comprehensive theory of human development that includes the evolution of the human body, cultural evolution and personal development: specifically, the research programs of Wilhelm Wundt, Lev Vygotsky and Albert Bandura. The lack of historical relations between these similar efforts is striking, and suggests that the effort to promote cultural and personal sources of consciousness arises as (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28. Science Rules: A Historical Introduction to Scientific Methods.Peter Achinstein (ed.) - 2004 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Is there a universal set of rules for discovering and testing scientific hypotheses? Since the birth of modern science, philosophers, scientists, and other thinkers have wrestled with this fundamental question of scientific practice. Efforts to devise rigorous methods for obtaining scientific knowledge include the twenty-one rules Descartes proposed in his Rules for the Direction of the Mind and the four rules of reasoning that begin the third book of Newton's Principia , and continue today in debates over the very (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  62
    A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Science, 2nd Ed. [REVIEW]Gary Hatfield - 1983 - Teaching Philosophy 6 (1):76-78.
    Review of: John Losee, A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Science, 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1980. 258 pages.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  18
    Science Incarnate: Historical Embodiments of Natural Knowledge.Christopher Lawrence & Steven Shapin (eds.) - 1998 - University of Chicago Press.
    Ever since Greek antiquity "disembodied knowledge" has often been taken as synonymous with "objective truth." Yet we also have very specific mental images of the kinds of bodies that house great minds--the ascetic philosopher versus the hearty surgeon, for example. Does truth have anything to do with the belly? What difference does it make to the pursuit of knowledge whether Einstein rode a bicycle, Russell was randy, or Darwin flatulent? Bringing body and knowledge into such intimate contact is occasionally seen (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  13
    Historical and Epistemological Reflections on the Culture of Machines Around the Renaissance: How Science and Technique Work?Raffaele Pisano & Paolo Bussotti - 2014 - Acta Baltica Historiae Et Philosophiae Scientiarum‎ 2 (2):20-42.
    This paper is divided into two parts, this being the first one. The second is entitled ‘Historical and Epistemological Reflections on the Culture of Machines around Renaissance: Machines, Machineries and Perpetual Motion’ and will be published in Acta Baltica Historiae et Philosophiae Scientiarum in 2015. Based on our recent studies, we provide here a historical and epistemological feature on the role played by machines and machineries. Ours is an epistemological thesis based on a series of historical examples (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  9
    Historical and Philosophical Perspectives of Science.Roger H. Stuewer (ed.) - 1970 - Gordon & Breach.
    Despite their shared interests, historians and philosophers of science collaborate poorly and generally lack firsthand experience in laboratories. This volume invents ways to develop their understanding of each other's goals and their common subject matter. Internatinally respected historians and philosophers of science clarify the distinct perspectives of each discipline and explore the types of interaction possible between them. By focusing on specific scientific problems, their papers make an excellent introduction to both historical and philosophical theories.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  4
    'The Geohistorical Revolution': The Emergence of Geology as an Historical Science.David Oldroyd - 2006 - Annals of Science 63 (4):493-501.
  34.  11
    A Psycho-Historical Research Program for the Integrative Science of Art.Nicolas J. Bullot & Rolf Reber - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):163 - 180.
    Critics of the target article objected to our account of art appreciators' sensitivity to art-historical contexts and functions, the relations among the modes of artistic appreciation, and the weaknesses of aesthetic science. To rebut these objections and justify our program, we argue that the current neglect of sensitivity to art-historical contexts persists as a result of a pervasive aesthetic–artistic confound; we further specify our claim that basic exposure and the design stance are necessary conditions of artistic understanding; (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  35.  10
    A Historical Perspective on the Distinction Between Basic and Applied Science.Nils Roll-Hansen - 2017 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 48 (4):535-551.
    The traditional distinction between basic and applied science has been much criticized in recent decades. The criticism is based on a combination of historical and systematic epistemic argument. The present paper is mostly concerned with the historical aspect. I argue that the critics impose an understanding at odds with the way the distinction was understood by its supporters in debates on science education and science policy in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. And I show how (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36.  64
    Phenomenotechnique in Historical Perspective: Its Origins and Implications for Philosophy of Science.Teresa Castelao-Lawless - 1995 - Philosophy of Science 62 (1):44-59.
    This article provides an overview of the historical and philosophical context from which originated G. Bachelard's concept of "phenomenotechnique". It analyzes why phenomenotechnique is crucial for science studies. By incorporating the concept of phenomenotechnique into Hacking's and Galison's models of science, I argue that we can avoid the radicalism of both while also preventing the analysis of scientific practices from collapsing into the interpretive frames mandated by social constructivists.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  37.  14
    Electricity and Vital Force: Discussing the Nature of Science Through a Historical Narrative.Andreia Guerra & Hermann Schiffer - 2015 - Science & Education 24 (4):409-434.
    Seeking a historical-philosophical approach to science teaching, narrative texts have been used as pedagogical tools to improve the learning experience of students. A review of the literature of different types of narrative texts and their different rates of effectiveness in science education is presented. This study was developed using the so-called Historical Narrative as a tool to introduce science content from a historical-philosophical approach, aiming to discuss science as a human construction. This project (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. The Importance of Historical Accuracy in Philosophy of Science: The Case of Curd's Conception of Copernican Rationality.Keith A. Nier - 1986 - Philosophy of Science 53 (3):372-394.
    General discussions of the appropriate relations between history and philosophy of science must be complemented by examinations of particular studies involving both fields. Martin Curd's attempt to illuminate the rationality of theory change through analysis of the Copernican Revolution is such a study; his work is undercut by serious flaws and actually displays an ahistorical approach. The result misleads both about the Copernican Revolution and the general problem of theory change in science. The study does illustrate several types (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  4
    Ecology as Historical Science.Bryson Brown - 2011 - In Kevin deLaplante, Bryson Brown & Kent A. Peacock (eds.), Philosophy of Ecology. North-Holland. pp. 11--251.
  40.  99
    The Philosophy of Natural History and Historiography Making Prehistory: Historical Science and the Scientific Realism Debate. [REVIEW]Aviezer Tucker - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (4):385-394.
  41.  17
    Simmel's Four Components of Historical Science.Richard Owsley & Gary Backhaus - 2003 - Human Studies 26 (2):209-222.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  9
    The Origin of Property and the Development of Scottish Historical Science.Paul Bowles - 1985 - Journal of the History of Ideas 46 (2):197.
  43.  68
    The Emergence and Evolution of the Expression “Conflict of Interests” in Science : A Historical Overview, 1880–2006.Yves Gingras & Pierre-Marc Gosselin - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (3):337-343.
    The tendency is strong to take the notion of “conflict of interests” for granted as if it had an invariant meaning and an ethical content independent of the historical context. It is doubtful however, from an historical and sociological point of view, that many of the cases now considered as instances of “conflicts of interests” would also have been conceived and perceived as such in, say, the 1930s. The idea of a “conflict of interests” presupposes that there are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  23
    Historical Science as Linguistic Figuration.Richard Harvey Brown - 1985 - Theory and Society 14 (5):677-703.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  21
    Heidegger’s Concept of “Authentic Historical Science”.Dmitri Ginev - 2015 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 36 (1):3-25.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  16
    Peter Heering, Stephen Klassen and Don Metz : Enabling Scientific Understanding Through Historical Instruments and Experiments in Formal and Non-Formal Learning Environments. Flensburg Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science in Science Education.Katharine Anderson - 2015 - Science & Education 24 (3):339-341.
    These proceedings of the International Conference for the History of Science in Science Education (ICHSSE) 2012 offer a snapshot of the work and conversations at an increasingly busy intersection: history of science, museum and science center staff, and science educators. The backgrounds of the editors reflect this mixture. Peter Heering, of the University of Flensburg, where the 2012 conference was held, is a historian and a leading figure in the field of replication studies, in which (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  13
    Is There a Cultural Barrier Between Historical Epistemology and Analytic Philosophy of Science?Anastasios Brenner - 2015 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 29 (2):201-214.
    One of the difficulties facing the philosopher of science today is the divide between historical epistemology and analytic philosophy of science. For over half a century these two traditions have followed independent and divergent paths. Historical epistemology, which originated in France in the early twentieth century, has recently been reformulated by a number of scholars such as Lorraine Daston, Ian Hacking, and Hans-Jörg Rheinberger. Elaborating novel historical methods, they seek to provide answers to major questions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  20
    The Main Tasks of Soviet Historical Science.A. Udaltsov - 1946 - Synthese 5 (5-6):243 - 244.
  49.  10
    An Introduction to Questions of Historical Science in Germany After Hitler, 1945–1950.Hans-Jürgen Eitner - 1988 - Philosophy and History 21 (1):68-68.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  8
    Methodical Problems of Historical Science.Michael Salewski - 1976 - Philosophy and History 9 (2):240-241.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 999