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    Holloway Sparks (1997). Dissident Citizenship: Democratic Theory, Political Courage, and Activist Women. Hypatia 12 (4):74-110.
    In this essay, I argue that contemporary democratic theory gives insufficient attention to the important contributions dissenting citizens make to democratic life. Guided by the dissident practices of activist women, I develop a more expansive conception of citizenship that recognizes dissent and an ethic of political courage as vital elements of democratic participation. I illustrate how this perspective on citizenship recasts and reclaims women's courageous dissidence by reconsidering the well-known story of Rosa Parks.
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  2. Holloway Sparks (2001). 20 Dissident Citizenship Democratic Theory, Political. In Abigail J. Stewart (ed.), Theorizing Feminism: Parallel Trends in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Westview Press 443.
     
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  3. Holloway Sparks (2016). Quarreling with Rancière: Race, Gender, and the Politics of Democratic Disruption. Philosophy and Rhetoric 49 (4):420-437.
    When I first starting hearing and reading about Jacques Rancière a number of years ago, I was deeply skeptical. Wasn’t this yet another European man becoming the new political theory “It Girl”? Wasn’t the claim that Rancière had a singular, fresh approach to dissent and protest overblown, when other people—especially critical race scholars, postcolonial theorists, feminists, queer theorists, and so on—had already addressed these topics thoroughly but were rarely acknowledged in mainstream scholarship? Did we really need to deify and create (...)
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