Results for 'Holly Gooding'

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  1.  15
    In Good Company: Divinization in Pierre Teilhard De Char-Din, Sj and Daoist Xiao Yingsou by Bede Benjamin Bidlack, And: Longing and Letting Go: Christian and Hindu Practices of Passionate Non-Attachment by Holly Gillgardner.Amos Yong - 2018 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 38 (1):405-409.
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  2.  64
    Education as a Positional Good.Martin Hollis - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 16 (2):235–244.
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  3.  15
    Unintended Messages: The Ethics of Teaching Genetic Dilemmas.Holly C. Gooding, Benjamin Wilfond, Karina Boehm & Barbara Bowles Biesecker - 2002 - Hastings Center Report 32 (2):37-39.
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  4.  53
    Positional Goods.Martin Hollis - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 18:97-110.
    In days gone by, when we had something called Rapid Economic Growth, we used to worry about it. We worried especially about its social costs and its technical limits. If growth meant gearing people to efficient production, we would have to be geographically and socially mobile. That threatened our old ways of community life, with their neighbourhood values and extended families. There were more obvious costs too, like chemicals in the air and highways through the landscape. Furthermore, the cornucopia need (...)
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  5.  12
    Holly Johnson, The Grammar of Good Friday: Macaronic Sermons of Late Medieval England. Turnhout: Brepols, 2012. Pp. Xxx, 485. €110. ISBN: 978-2-503-53339-1. [REVIEW]Ronald J. Stansbury - 2015 - Speculum 90 (1):265-267.
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  6.  12
    Education as a Positional Good.Martin Hollis - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 16 (2):235-244.
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  7.  18
    The Good, the Bad and the Early Adopters: Providers' Attitudes About a Common, Commercial EHR.Anil N. Makam, Holly J. Lanham, Kim Batchelor, Brett Moran, Temple Howell-Stampley, Lynne Kirk, Manjula Cherukuri, Lipika Samal, Noel Santini, Luci K. Leykum & Ethan A. Halm - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (1):36-42.
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  8.  5
    Good Will in Politics.Martin Hollis - 1976 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 10 (1):167-171.
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  9.  4
    Good Will in Politics.Martin Hollis - 1976 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 10 (1):167–171.
  10.  12
    My Role and its Duties1: Martin Hollis.Martin Hollis - 1974 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 8:180-199.
    Recipes for the Good Society used to run, in caricature, something like this: 1. Take about 2000 hoM, sap., analyse each into essence and accidents and discard the accidents. 2. Place essences in a large casserole, add socialising syrup and stew until conflict disappears. 3. Serve with a pinch of salt.
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  11.  14
    Genetic Research Involving Human Biological Materials: A Need to Tailor Current Consent Forms.Sara Chandros Hull, Holly Gooding, Alison P. Klein, Esther Warshauer-Baker, Susan Metosky & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2004 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 26 (3):1.
  12.  10
    The Social Liberty Game1: Martin Hollis.Martin Hollis - 1983 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 15:31-44.
    It might surprise someone, who knew only On Liberty, to hear J. S. Mill called the father of British socialism. That would sound a careless bid for a respectable pedigree, on a par with hailing King Canute as father of the British seaside holiday. Mill is passionate there about making the individual a protected species, not to be interfered with even for his own good, unless to prevent harm to others. He is so passionate that government seems at times to (...)
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  13.  1
    Character Education: Transforming Values Into Virtue.Holly Shepard Salls - 2006 - Upa.
    Character Education juxtaposes John Dewey's philosophy of the person and values education with Alasdair MacIntyre's treatment of Aristotle's virtue theory in order to highlight the importance of virtue in developing good character.
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  14.  8
    Trust Within Reason.Martin Hollis - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    Some philosophers hold that trust grows fragile when people become too rational. They advocate a retreat from reason and a return to local, traditional values. Others hold that truly rational people are both trusting and trustworthy. Everything hinges on what we mean by 'reason' and 'rational'. If these are understood in an egocentric, instrumental fashion, then they are indeed incompatible with trust. With the help of game theory, Martin Hollis argues against that narrow definition and in favour of a richer, (...)
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  15.  16
    Trust Within Reason (SJ Brams).M. Hollis - 1999 - Philosophical Books 40 (2):129-130.
    Some philosophers hold that trust grows fragile when people become too rational. They advocate a retreat from reason and a return to local, traditional values. Others hold that truly rational people are both trusting and trustworthy. Everything hinges on what we mean by 'reason' and 'rational'. If these are understood in an egocentric, instrumental fashion, then they are indeed incompatible with trust. With the help of game theory, Martin Hollis argues against that narrow definition and in favour of a richer, (...)
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  16.  38
    The Emperor's Newest Clothes.Martin Hollis - 1985 - Economics and Philosophy 1 (1):128-133.
    There is a simple joy in finding that the emperor has positively no clothes and especially when the finger is pointed in ribald good English. Donald McCloskey does this service in “The Rhetoric of Economics”, where he argues with force and wit that “modernism” (meaning, roughly, positivism, as in “Positive Economics”) will do as an account neither of what economists do nor of what it makes philosophical sense for them to attempt. Instead they should recognize that models are always metaphors (...)
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  17. What 'We'?Holly Lawford-Smith - 2015 - Journal of Social Ontology 1 (2):225-250.
    The objective of this paper is to explain why certain authors - both popular and academic - are making a mistake when they attribute obligations to uncoordinated groups of persons, and to argue that it is particularly unhelpful to make this mistake given the prevalence of individuals faced with the difficult question of what morality requires of them in a situation in which there's a good they can bring about together with others, but not alone. I'll defend two alternatives to (...)
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  18. Unethical Consumption & Obligations to Signal.Holly Lawford-Smith - 2015 - Ethics and International Affairs 29 (3):315-330.
    Many of the items that humans consume are produced in ways that involve serious harms to persons. Familiar examples include the harms involved in the extraction and trade of conflict minerals (e.g. coltan, diamonds), the acquisition and import of non- fair trade produce (e.g. coffee, chocolate, bananas, rice), and the manufacture of goods in sweatshops (e.g. clothing, sporting equipment). In addition, consumption of certain goods (significantly fossil fuels and the products of the agricultural industry) involves harm to the environment, to (...)
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  19. Debate: Ideal Theory—A Reply to Valentini.Holly Lawford-Smith - 2010 - Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (3):357-368.
    In her ‘On the apparent paradox of ideal theory’, Laura Valentini combines three supposedly plausible premises to derive the paradoxical result that ideal theory is both unable to, and indispensable for, guiding action. Her strategy is to undermine one of the three premises by arguing that there are good and bad kinds of ideal theory, and only the bad kinds are vulnerable to the strongest version of their opponents’ attack. By undermining one of the three premises she releases ideal theorists (...)
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  20. Does Purchasing Make Consumers Complicit in Global Labour Injustice?Holly Lawford-Smith - 2018 - Res Publica 24 (3):319-338.
    Do consumers’ ordinary actions of purchasing certain goods make them complicit in global labour injustice? To establish that they do, two things much be shown. First, it must be established that they are not more than complicit, for example that they are not the principal perpetrators. Second, it must be established that they meet the conditions for complicity on a plausible account. I argue that Kutz’s account faces an objection that makes Lepora and Goodin’s better suited, and defend the idea (...)
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  21. Non-Ideal Accessibility.Holly Lawford-Smith - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):653-669.
    What should we do when we won't do as we ought? Suppose it ought to be that the procrastinating professor accept the task of reviewing a book, and actually review the book. It seems clear that given he won't review it, he ought not to accept the task. That is a genuine moral obligation in light of less than perfect circumstances. I want to entertain the possibility that a set of such obligations form something like a 'practical morality'; that which (...)
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  22. Plato's Analogical Thought.Holly Moore - 2009 - Dissertation, DePaul University
    The philosophical concept of analogy is fundamental to the theory of imaging that characterizes Plato’s metaphysics, cosmology, and methodology. While Plato never explicitly conceptualizes the philosophical role of analogy, his dialogues are rife with analogies and images that are often pivotal to the thought expressed there. An analysis of celebrated analogies such as the sun and the good in the Republic, the “second sailing” in the Phaedo, the “receptacle” (chōra) in the Timaeus, and the example of weaving in the Statesman (...)
     
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  23. Killing, Letting Die, and Euthanasia.Holly Smith Goldman - 1980 - Analysis 40 (4):224 -.
    Death is not always an evil for the person who dies. The implication for euthanasia is clear-cut. When death counts as a good for someone, directly killing the person would be no worse, and might be better, than merely allowing her to die.
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  24.  26
    Market Equality and Social Freedom.Martin Hollis - 1990 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (1):15-24.
    ABSTRACT Conflicts between the good of each and the good of all are often presented in terms of freedom versus equality, with liberals pulled one way by libertarians and the other by social democrats. When we distinguish between negative and positive notions not only of freedom but also of equality, the liberal freedom ‘to pursue our own good in our own way’is a positive freedom involving a negative idea of equality . Yet ‘equity’is not strong enough to deal with the (...)
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  25.  72
    Climate Matters Pro Tanto, Does It Matter All-Things-Considered?Holly Lawford-Smith - 2016 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 40 (1):129-142.
    In Climate Matters (2012), John Broome argues that individuals have private duties to offset all emissions for which they are causally responsible, grounded in the general moral injunction against doing harm. Emissions do harm, therefore they must be neutralized. I argue that individuals' private duties to offset emissions cannot be grounded in a duty to do no harm, because there can be no such general duty. It is virtually impossible in our current social context―for those in developed countries at least―to (...)
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  26. On Satisfying Duties to Assist.Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith - 2019 - In Hilary Greaves & Theron Pummer (eds.), Effective Altruism: Philosophical Issues. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    In this paper, we take up the question of whether there comes a point at which one is no longer morally obliged to do further good, even at very low cost to oneself. More specifically, they ask: under precisely what conditions is it plausible to say that that “point” has been reached? A crude account might focus only on, say, the amount of good the agent has already done, but a moment’s reflection shows that this is indeed too crude. We (...)
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  27.  25
    My Role and its Duties.Martin Hollis - 1974 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 8:180-199.
    Recipes for the Good Society used to run, in caricature, something like this: 1. Take about 2000 hoM, sap. , analyse each into essence and accidents and discard the accidents. 2. Place essences in a large casserole, add socialising syrup and stew until conflict disappears. 3. Serve with a pinch of salt.
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  28.  27
    Two Adynata in Horace, Epode 16.A. S. Hollis - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (01):311-.
    Horace had good reason to know these lines since they come from the foundation oracle of one of his favourite places, Tarentum, delivered to the founder Phalanthus whom Horace mentions in Odes 2.6.11–12, ‘regnata petam Laconi | rura Phalantho’. It is a regular feature of such oracles that, however absurd and impossible they may seem, they will be fulfilled in a quite unexpected way.
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  29.  8
    The Social Liberty Game.Martin Hollis - 1983 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 15:31-44.
    It might surprise someone, who knew only On Liberty , to hear J. S. Mill called the father of British socialism. That would sound a careless bid for a respectable pedigree, on a par with hailing King Canute as father of the British seaside holiday. Mill is passionate there about making the individual a protected species, not to be interfered with even for his own good, unless to prevent harm to others. He is so passionate that government seems at times (...)
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  30.  3
    Toward the search for the perfect blade runner: a large-scale, international assessment of a test that screens for “humanness sensitivity”.Robert Epstein, Maria Bordyug, Ya-Han Chen, Yijing Chen, Anna Ginther, Gina Kirkish & Holly Stead - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-21.
    We introduce a construct called “humanness sensitivity,” which we define as the ability to recognize uniquely human characteristics. To evaluate the construct, we used a “concurrent study design” to conduct an internet-based study with a convenience sample of 42,063 people from 88 countries.We sought to determine to what extent people could identify subtle characteristics of human behavior, thinking, emotions, and social relationships which currently distinguish humans from non-human entities such as bots. Many people were surprisingly poor at this task, even (...)
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  31.  19
    Sartorial Epistemology in Tatters: A Reply to Martin Hollis: Donald N. McCloskey.Donald N. McCloskey - 1985 - Economics and Philosophy 1 (1):134-137.
    Martin Hollis, in the introduction to the collection of Rationality and Relativism he edited recently with Steven Lukes, describes himself as the most arch of arch rationalists, “by which we mean, merely, that [we] reject the forthright relativization of truth and reason.” You might suppose that his self-description would place him unambiguously in the army of traditionalists arrayed against what Richard Rorty fondly calls the New Fuzzies. You might suppose, then, that Hollis would indulge in furious letter writing to, say, (...)
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  32.  15
    DE LA EDINBURGH 1910 LA EDINBURGH 2010. LUCRĂRILE COMISIEI A IV-A.Adrian Boldișor - 2011 - Analele Universităţii Din Craiova, Seria Istorie 20 (2):299-315.
    In 1910, delegates from all over the World met together for ten days in Edinburgh, for the First World Missionary Conference. For many people, these conferences marked the first step of the end of the colonial missionary era. The importance of Edinburgh 1910 must be seen in the following the conference. On the 6th of August 2010, the Committee in charge with organizing the meeting, celebrated a century from the first missionary Conference in Edinburgh and presented the conclusions of these (...)
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  33.  52
    The Genesis of Iconology.Jaś Elsner & Katharina Lorenz - 2012 - Critical Inquiry 38 (3):483-512.
    Erwin Panofsky explicitly states that the first half of the opening chapter of Studies in Iconology—his landmark American publication of 1939—contains ‘the revised content of a methodological article published by the writer in 1932’, which is now translated for the first time in this issue of Critical Inquiry.1 That article, published in the philosophical journal Logos, is among his most important works. First, it marks the apogee of his series of philosophically reflective essays on how to do art history,2 that (...)
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  34.  62
    Subjective Rightness: Holly M. Smith.Holly M. Smith - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (2):64-110.
    Twentieth century philosophers introduced the distinction between “objective rightness” and “subjective rightness” to achieve two primary goals. The first goal is to reduce the paradoxical tension between our judgments of what is best for an agent to do in light of the actual circumstances in which she acts and what is wisest for her to do in light of her mistaken or uncertain beliefs about her circumstances. The second goal is to provide moral guidance to an agent who may be (...)
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  35.  58
    Objectivism and Prospectivism About Rightness.Elinor Mason - 2013 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 7 (2):1-22.
    In this paper I present a new argument for prospectivism: the view that, for a consequentialist, rightness depends on what is prospectively best rather than what would actually be best. Prospective bestness depends on the agent’s epistemic position, though exactly how that works is not straightforward. I clarify various possible versions of prospectivism, which differ in how far they go in relativizing to the agent’s limitations. My argument for prospectivism is an argument for moderately objective prospectivism, according to which the (...)
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  36.  2
    Avatar: The Last Airbender and Philosophy: Wisdom From Aang to Zuko.Helen De Cruz & Johan De Smedt (eds.) - 2022 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    A table of contents, in lieu of abstract -/- Foreword by Aaron Ehasz -/- Introduction: “We are all one people, but we live as if divided” Helen De Cruz and Johan De Smedt -/- Part I The Universe of Avatar: The Last Airbender -/- 1 Native Philosophies and Relationality in ATLA: It’s (Lion) Turtles All the Way Down Miranda Belarde-Lewis and Clementine Bordeaux 2 Getting Elemental: How Many Elements Are There in Avatar: The Last Airbender? Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa 3 The Personalities (...)
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  37. Measuring the Consequences of Rules: Holly M. Smith.Holly M. Smith - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (4):413-433.
    Recently two distinct forms of rule-utilitarianism have been introduced that differ on how to measure the consequences of rules. Brad Hooker advocates fixed-rate rule-utilitarianism, while Michael Ridge advocates variable-rate rule-utilitarianism. I argue that both of these are inferior to a new proposal, optimum-rate rule-utilitarianism. According to optimum-rate rule-utilitarianism, an ideal code is the code whose optimum acceptance level is no lower than that of any alternative code. I then argue that all three forms of rule-utilitarianism fall prey to two fatal (...)
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  38.  39
    Good Thinking: The Foundations of Probability and its Applications.Irving John Good - 1983 - Univ Minnesota Pr.
    ... Press for their editorial perspicacity, to the National Institutes of Health for the partial financial support they gave me while I was writing some of the chapters, and to Donald Michie for suggesting the title Good Thinking.
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  39.  10
    Making Morality Work By Holly M. Smith.Holly M. Smith - 2022 - Analysis 81 (4):729-731.
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  40.  10
    The Ethics of Asking: Dilemmas in Higher Education Fund Raising.Deni Elliott (ed.) - 1995 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
    & A college development officer is offered a generous gift by a donor whose identity would embarrass the institution. Should the development officer accept? & A volunteer lies about his level of giving, but classmates believe him and match his "gift." Should donors be told the truth? & A development officer must explain to a donor the difference between naming an endowed chair and selecting the person to fill the chair. Where is the line between reasonable donor expectations and intrusion? (...)
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  41. Rationality and Relativism.Martin Hollis & Steven Lukes (eds.) - 1982 - MIT Press.
    Are there absolute truths that can be gradually approached over time through rational processes? Or are all modes and systems of thought equally valid if viewed from within their own internally consistent frames of reference? Are there universal forms of reasoning and understanding that enable us to distinguish between rational beliefs and those that are demonstrably false, or is everything relative?These central questions are addressed and debated by the distinguished contributors to this lively book. Some of them - Hollis, Lukes, (...)
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  42.  45
    Belief: An Essay.Jamie Iredell - 2011 - Continent 1 (4):279-285.
    continent. 1.4 (2011): 279—285. Concerning its Transitive Nature, the Conversion of Native Americans of Spanish Colonial California, Indoctrinated Catholicism, & the Creation There’s no direct archaeological evidence that Jesus ever existed. 1 I memorized the Act of Contrition. I don’t remember it now, except the beginning: Forgive me Father for I have sinned . . . This was in preparation for the Sacrament of Holy Reconciliation, where in a confessional I confessed my sins to Father Scott, who looked like Jesus, (...)
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  43. Don't Take My Word for It: On Beliefs, Affects, Reasons, Values, Rationality, and Aesthetic Testimony.Daniel Whiting - 2017 - In Paul Noordhof, Ema Sullivan-Bissett & Helen Bradley (eds.), Art and Belief. Oxford University Press.
    Aesthetic testimony is not a source of knowledge; it is not even a source of rational belief. If, for example, Holly tells Harry that Wim Wenders’ Paris, Texas is good, Harry cannot come to know or rationally believe that the film is good on the basis of Holly’s testimony alone. This chapter outlines a novel argument for this view, one which serves also to explain it. That argument appeals to four principles connecting rationality and reasons, reasons and values, (...)
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  44.  33
    Two-Tier Moral Codes: HOLLY M. SMITH.Holly M. Smith - 1989 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (1):112-132.
    A moral code consists of principles that assign moral status to individual actions – principles that evaluate acts as right or wrong, prohibited or obligatory, permissible or supererogatory. Many theorists have held that such principles must serve two distinct functions. On the one hand, they serve a theoretical function, insofar as they specify the characteristics in virtue of which acts possess their moral status. On the other hand, they serve a practical function, insofar as they provide an action-guide: a standard (...)
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  45.  3
    Positional Goods1: Martin Hollis.Martin Hollis - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 18:97-110.
    In days gone by, when we had something called Rapid Economic Growth, we used to worry about it. We worried especially about its social costs and its technical limits. If growth meant gearing people to efficient production, we would have to be geographically and socially mobile. That threatened our old ways of community life, with their neighbourhood values and extended families. There were more obvious costs too, like chemicals in the air and highways through the landscape. Furthermore, the cornucopia need (...)
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  46.  19
    Making Morality Work.Holly M. Smith - 2018 - Oxford, Great Britain: Oxford University Press.
    What should we do if we cannot figure what morality requires of us? Holly M. Smith argues that the best moral codes solve this problem by offering two tiers, one of which tells us what makes acts right and wrong, and the other of which provides user-friendly decision guides. She opens a path towards resolving a deep problem of moral life.
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  47.  22
    Of Masks and Men Martin Hollis.Martin Hollis - 1985 - In Michael Carrithers, Steven Collins & Steven Lukes (eds.), The Category of the Person: Anthropology, Philosophy, History. Cambridge University Press. pp. 217.
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  48. Culpable Ignorance.Holly Smith - 1983 - Philosophical Review 92 (4):543-571.
  49.  40
    Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future.Friedrich Nietzsche (ed.) - 1907 - Penguin Books.
    Beyond Good and Evil is one of the most scathing and powerful critiques of philosophy, religion, science, politics and ethics ever written. In it, Nietzsche presents a set of problems, criticisms and philosophical challenges that continue both to inspire and to trouble contemporary thought. In addition, he offers his most subtle, detailed and sophisticated account of the virtues, ideas, and practices which will characterize philosophy and philosophers of the future. With his relentlessly energetic style and tirelessly probing manner, Nietzsche embodies (...)
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  50.  48
    A Good Explanation of an Event is Not Necessarily Corroborated by the Event.I. J. Good - 1982 - Philosophy of Science 49 (2):251-253.
    It is shown by means of a simple example that a good explanation of an event is not necessarily corroborated by the occurrence of that event. It is also shown that this contention follows symbolically if an explanation having higher "explicativity" than another is regarded as better.
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