39 found
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  1.  21
    Disvalues in Nature.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1992 - The Monist 75 (2):250-278.
    To accentuate the positive one can eliminate the negative. A touchstone for any theory of truth is its theory of error; a theory of value needs to handle disvalue. Philosophers, lately exercised about values in nature, have not yet much asked about disvalues there. They have also cautioned against committing an alleged naturalistic fallacy. The usual version, the positive naturalistic fallacy, argues from is to ought. Nature is described such and such a way; that is a good thing and ought (...)
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  2.  9
    Are Values in Nature Subjective or Objective?Iii Holmes Rolston - 1982 - Environmental Ethics 4 (2):125-151.
    Prevailing accounts of natural values as the subjective response of the human mind are reviewed and contested. Discoveries in the physical sciences tempt us to strip the reality away from many native-range qualities, including values, but discoveries in the biological sciences counterbalance this by finding sophisticated structures and selective processes in earthen nature. On the one hand, all human knowing and valuing contain subjective components, being theory-Iaden. On the other hand, in ordinary natural affairs, in scientific knowing, and in valuing, (...)
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  3.  26
    Values in Nature.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1981 - Environmental Ethics 3 (2):113-128.
    Nature is examined as a carrier of values. Despite problems of subjectivity and objectivity in value assignments, values are actualized in human relationships with nature, sometimes by (human) constructive activity depending on a natural support, sometimes by a sensitive, if an interpretive, appreciation of the characteristics of natural objects. Ten areas of values associated with nature are recognized: (1)economic value, (2) life support value, (3) recreational value, (4) scientific value, (5) aesthetic value, (6) life value, (7) diversity and unity values, (...)
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  4.  8
    Can and Ought We to Follow Nature?Holmes Rolston Iii - 1979 - Environmental Ethics 1 (1):7-30.
    “Nature knows best” is reconsidered from an ecological perspective which suggests that we ought to follow nature. The phrase “follow nature” has many meanings. In an absolute law-of-nature sense, persons invariably and necessarily act in accordance with natural laws, and thus cannot but follow nature. In an artifactual sense, all deliberate human conduct is viewed as unnatural, and thus it is impossible to follow nature. As a result, the answer to the question, whether we can and ought to follow nature, (...)
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  5.  18
    Can the East Help the West to Value Nature?Iii Holmes Rolston - 1987 - Philosophy East and West 37 (2):172-190.
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  6.  3
    Environmental Ethics in Antartica.Iii Holmes Rolston - 2002 - Environmental Ethics 24 (2):115-134.
    The concerns of environmental ethics on other continents fail in Antarctica, which is without sustainable development, or ecosystems for a “land ethic,” or even familiar terrestrial fauna and flora. An Antarctic regime, developing politically, has been developing an ethics, underrunning the politics, remarkably exemplified in the Madrid Protocol, protecting “the intrinsic value of Antarctica.” Without inhabitants, claims of sovereignty are problematic. Antarctica is a continent for scientists and, more recently, tourists. Both focus on wild nature. Life is driven to extremes; (...)
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  7.  19
    Environmental Protection and an Equitable International Order.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (4):735-752.
    The UNCED Earth Summit established two new principles of international justice: an equitable international order and protection of the environment. UNCED was a significant symbol, a morality play about environment and economics. Wealth is asymmetrically distributed; approximately one-fifth of the world produces and consumes four-fifths of goods and services; four-fifths get one-fifth. This distribution can be interpreted as both an earnings differential and as exploitation. Responses may require justice or charity, producing and sharing. Natural and national resources come into tension (...)
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  8.  10
    Mountain Majesties Above Fruited Plains: Culture, Nature, and Rocky Mountain Aesthetics.Iii Holmes Rolston - 2008 - Environmental Ethics 30 (1):3-20.
    Those residing in the Rocky Mountains enjoy both nature and culture in ways not characteristic of many inhabited landscapes. Landscapes elsewhere in the United States and in Europe involve a nature-culture synthesis. An original nature, once encountered by settlers, has been transformed by a dominating culture, and on the resulting landscape, there is little experience of primordial nature. On Rocky Mountain landscapes, the model is an ellipse with two foci. Much of the landscape is in synthesis, but there is much (...)
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  9.  12
    Nature and Culture In Environmental Ethics.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1999 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1:151-158.
    The pivotal claim in environmental ethics is that humans in their cultures are out of sustainable relationships to the natural environments comprising the landscapes on which these cultures are superimposed. But bringing such culture into more intelligent relationships with the natural world requires not so much “naturalizing culture” as discriminating recognition of the radical differences between nature and culture, on the basis of which a dialectical ethic of complementarity may be possible. How far nature can and ought be managed and (...)
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  10. Andrew Brennan: Thinking About Nature.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1989 - Environmental Ethics 11 (3):259-267.
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  11.  7
    Ecology Redesigning Genes: Ethical and Sikh Perspective. [REVIEW]Iii Holmes Rolston - 2008 - Environmental Ethics 30 (2):215-216.
  12.  7
    The Fallacy of Wildlife Conservation. [REVIEW]Iii Holmes Rolston - 1985 - Environmental Ethics 7 (2):177-180.
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  13.  7
    Values in Nature.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1981 - Environmental Ethics 3 (2):113-128.
    Nature is examined as a carrier of values. Despite problems of subjectivity and objectivity in value assignments, values are actualized in human relationships with nature, sometimes by constructive activity depending on a natural support, sometimes by a sensitive, if an interpretive, appreciation of the characteristics of natural objects. Ten areas of values associated with nature are recognized: economic value, life support value, recreational value, scientific value, aesthetic value, life value, diversity and unity values, stability and spontaneity values, dialectical value, and (...)
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  14.  10
    The Natural Environment: An Annotated Bibliography on Attitudes and Values.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1986 - Environmental Ethics 8 (1):91-93.
  15.  10
    Valuing Wildlands.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1985 - Environmental Ethics 7 (1):23-48.
    Valuing wildlands is complex. (1) In a philosophically oriented analysis, I distinguish seven meaning levels of value, individual preference, market price, individual good, social preference, social good, organismic, and ecosystemic, and itemize twelve types of value carried by wildlands, economic, life support, recreational, scientific, genetic diversity, aesthetic, cultural syrubolization, historical, characterbuilding, therapeutic, religious, and intrinsic. (2) I criticize contingent valuation efforts to price these values. (3) I then propose an axiological model, which interrelates the multiple levels and types of value, (...)
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  16.  9
    The Fallacy of Wildlife Conservation.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1985 - Environmental Ethics 7 (2):177-180.
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  17.  21
    Aesthetic Experience in Forests.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1998 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (2):157-166.
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  18.  7
    Nature and Human Emotions.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1979 - Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 1:89-96.
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  19.  6
    Environmental Ethics: An Introduction to Environmental Philosophy.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (2):219-224.
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  20.  3
    Can and Ought We to Follow Nature?Iii Holmes Rolston - 1979 - Environmental Ethics 1 (1):7-30.
    “Nature knows best” is reconsidered from an ecological perspective which suggests that we ought to follow nature. The phrase “follow nature” has many meanings. In an absolute law-of-nature sense, persons invariably and necessarily act in accordance with natural laws, and thus cannot but follow nature. In an artifactual sense, all deliberate human conduct is viewed as unnatural, and thus it is impossible to follow nature. As a result, the answer to the question, whether we can and ought to follow nature, (...)
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  21.  3
    Environment and the Moral Life: Towards a New Paradigm. [REVIEW]Iii Holmes Rolston - 1999 - Environmental Ethics 21 (4):441-443.
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  22.  4
    Environment and the Moral Life: Towards a New Paradigm.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1999 - Environmental Ethics 21 (4):441-443.
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  23.  6
    Schlick's Responsible Man.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1975 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (2):261-267.
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  24.  2
    Ecology.Iii Holmes Rolston - 2007 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 4 (2):293-312.
  25.  2
    South African Environments Into the 21st Century.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1992 - Environmental Ethics 14 (1):87-91.
  26.  1
    Before It Is Too Late. [REVIEW]Iii Holmes Rolston - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (3):269-271.
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  27.  1
    The Natural Environment: An Annotated Bibliography on Attitudes and Values. [REVIEW]Iii Holmes Rolston - 1986 - Environmental Ethics 8 (1):91-93.
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  28.  1
    The Future of Environmental Ethics.Iii Holmes Rolston - 2007 - Teaching Ethics 8 (1):1-27.
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  29.  1
    Before It is Too Late.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (3):269-271.
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  30.  1
    Environmental Philosophy.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1982 - Environmental Ethics 4 (1):69-74.
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  31. Are Values in Nature Subjective or Objective?Iii Holmes Rolston - 1982 - Environmental Ethics 4 (2):125-151.
    Prevailing accounts of natural values as the subjective response of the human mind are reviewed and contested. Discoveries in the physical sciences tempt us to strip the reality away from many native-range qualities, including values, but discoveries in the biological sciences counterbalance this by finding sophisticated structures and selective processes in earthen nature. On the one hand, all human knowing and valuing contain subjective components, being theory-Iaden. On the other hand, in ordinary natural affairs, in scientific knowing, and in valuing, (...)
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  32. Bryan G. Norton, Ed., The Preservation of Species. [REVIEW]Iii Holmes Rolston - 1986 - Philosophy in Review 6:519-521.
     
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  33. Ecology: A Primer for Christian Ethics.Iii Holmes Rolston - 2007 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 4 (2):293-312.
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  34. Environmental Ethics: An Introduction to Environmental Philosophy. [REVIEW]Iii Holmes Rolston - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (2):219-224.
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  35. Environmental Ethics in Antartica.Iii Holmes Rolston - 2002 - Environmental Ethics 24 (2):115-134.
    The concerns of environmental ethics on other continents fail in Antarctica, which is without sustainable development, or ecosystems for a “land ethic,” or even familiar terrestrial fauna and flora. An Antarctic regime, developing politically, has been developing an ethics, underrunning the politics, remarkably exemplified in the Madrid Protocol, protecting “the intrinsic value of Antarctica.” Without inhabitants, claims of sovereignty are problematic. Antarctica is a continent for scientists and, more recently, tourists. Both focus on wild nature. Life is driven to extremes; (...)
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  36. Environmental Philosophy. [REVIEW]Iii Holmes Rolston - 1982 - Environmental Ethics 4 (1):69-74.
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  37. Keekok Lee, Social Philosophy and Ecological Scarcity. [REVIEW]Iii Holmes Rolston - 1991 - Philosophy in Review 11:202-204.
     
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  38. Leroy S. Rouner, Ed., On Nature. [REVIEW]Iii Holmes Rolston - 1985 - Philosophy in Review 5:388-390.
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  39. Valuing Wildlands.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1985 - Environmental Ethics 7 (1):23-48.
    Valuing wildlands is complex. In a philosophically oriented analysis, I distinguish seven meaning levels of value, individual preference, market price, individual good, social preference, social good, organismic, and ecosystemic, and itemize twelve types of value carried by wildlands, economic, life support, recreational, scientific, genetic diversity, aesthetic, cultural syrubolization, historical, characterbuilding, therapeutic, religious, and intrinsic. I criticize contingent valuation efforts to price these values. I then propose an axiological model, which interrelates the multiple levels and types of value, and some principles (...)
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