Results for 'Horace Neill Mcfarland'

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  1.  1
    Bertrand Russell, A. S. Neill, Homer Lane, W. H. Kilpatrick: Four Progressive Educators.J. W. Tibble, Leslie R. Perry, Bertrand Russell, A. S. Neill, Homer Lane & W. H. Kilpatrick - 1968 - British Journal of Educational Studies 16 (2):214.
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  2. Aristotle's Poetics. Demetrius, on Style. And, Selections From Aristotle's Rhetoric. Together with Hobbes' Digest. And Horace's Ars Poetica. [REVIEW]Thomas Aristotle, Demetrius, Daniel Horace, T. Allen Hobbes & Twining - 1934 - J.M. Dent.
     
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  3.  15
    Guilty Robots, Happy Dogs: The Question of Alien Minds.David McFarland - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    When we interact with animals, we intuitively read thoughts and feelings into their expressions and actions - it is easy to suppose that they have minds like ours. And as technology grows more sophisticated, we might soon find ourselves interpreting the behaviour of robots too in human terms. -/- It is natural for us to humanize other beings in this way, but is it philosophically or scientifically justifiable? How different might the minds of animals or machines be to ours? As (...)
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  4. Guilty Robots, Happy Dogs: The Question of Alien Minds.David McFarland - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Do animals have thoughts and feelings? Could robots have minds like our own? Can we ever know, or will the answer be forever out of our reach? David McFarland explores the answers to these questions, drawing not only on the philosophy of mind, but also on developments in artificial intelligence, robots, and the science of animal behaviour.
     
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  5. Paradoxes of Freedom: The Romantic Mystique of a Transcendence.Thomas McFarland - 1996 - Clarendon Press.
    Paradoxes of Freedom is a study of the philosophical and historical concept of liberty. Centring his argument upon the Romantic exaltation of freedom, Thomas McFarland identifies freedom as one of the three chief transcendences, along with love and religion, by which humanity orientates itself. McFarland indicates, by an examination ranging from Shakespeare and Luther to the writings of Nietzsche and Wagner, both the reasons for the supreme valuation of freedom and the nature of the hindrances, in theory and (...)
     
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  6.  9
    The Complex Mind.David McFarland, Keith Stenning & Maggie McGonigle (eds.) - 2012 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Notes on Contributors -- PART I: COMPLEXITY IN ANIMAL MINDS -- Introduction: M.McGonigle-Chalmers -- Relational and Absolute Discrimination Learning by Squirrel Monkeys: Establishing a Common Ground with Human Cognition; B.T.Jones -- Serial List Retention by Non-Human Primates: Complexity and Cognitive Continuity; F.R.Treichler -- The Use of Spatial Structure in Working Memory: A Comparative Standpoint; C.De Lillo -- The Emergence of Linear Sequencing in Children: A Continuity Account and a Formal Model; M.McGonigle-Chalmers&I.Kusel (...)
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  7. Ethics and Psychology: Beyond Codes of Practice.Calum Neill - 2016 - Routledge.
    This highly original book_ _explores the idea and potential of psychology in the context of ethical theory, and the idea of ethics in the context of psychology. In so doing, it not only interrogates how we come to understand ethics and notions of right behaviour, but also questions the discipline of psychology and how it functions in the 21 st century. Neill turns psychology inside out, controversially suggesting that psychology no longer exists as we know it. He proposes a (...)
     
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  8.  4
    Makers of the Modern Mind.Thomas Patrick Neill - 1949 - Milwaukee, Bruce Pub. Co..
    MAKERS of the MODERN MIND THOMAS P. NEILL, P H. D. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY THE BRUCE PUBLISHING COMPANY MILWAUKEE Copyright, 1949,..
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  9. Rites of Privacy and the Privacy Trade: On the Limits of Protection for the Self.Elizabeth Neill - 2001 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    In Rites of Privacy and the Privacy Trade Neill constructs an original theory of natural rights and human dignity to ground our right to privacy, arguing that privacy and autonomy are innate natural properties metaphorically represented on the moral level and socially bestowed. She develops her position by drawing on works in history, sociology, metaphor, law, and the moral psychology of Lawrence Kohlberg. The resulting theory provides surprising answers to controversial and pressing questions regarding, for instance, our right to (...)
     
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  10.  97
    Crane on Concepts and Experiential Content.Duncan McFarland - 1998 - Analysis 58 (1):54-58.
  11.  29
    Clozapine Rationing in a State Mental Hospital: Reviewing a Hec's Case Consultation. [REVIEW]Patricia Backlar & Bentson H. McFarland - 1993 - HEC Forum 5 (5):302-318.
    Clozapine (Clozaril) is a new, powerful, costly anti-psychotic medicine, with a possible serious side effect (agranulocytosis) that entails weekly blood monitoring. In a three hundred bed state mental hospital that is allotted thirty clozapine slots (high costs effectively rationing this drug), a woman with schizophrenia responds minimally to this medication. Her attending physician wishes to withdraw the medicine and give it to another patient with schizophrenia on the ward who might have a better response. The woman's family threatens to make (...)
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  12.  22
    Locke on Habituation, Autonomy, and Education.Alex Neill - 1989 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (2):225-245.
  13.  10
    Guest Editors' Introduction.Patricia Backlar & Bentson H. McFarland - 1993 - HEC Forum 5 (5):270-271.
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  14.  19
    A National Survey of Ethics Committees in State Mental Hospitals.Patricia Backlar & Bentson H. McFarland - 1993 - HEC Forum 5 (5):272-288.
    In June 1992, a national mail survey was directed to 204 state inpatient psychiatric institutions. This study was implemented following the 1992 Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) requirement that hospitals put in place some means with which to address ethical issues. The goals of the study were: 1. to examine state mental hospital characteristics and their response to the JCAHO requirements; 2. to describe healthcare ethics committee (HEC) composition, function, and role; 3. to study patient and family (...)
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  15.  16
    Fear and Belief.Alex Neill - 1995 - Philosophy and Literature 19 (1):94-101.
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  16. Constructing Practical Reason: O'Neill on the Grounds of Kantian Constructivism.Thomas M. Besch - 2008 - Journal of Value Inquiry 42 (1):55-76.
    The paper addresses O'Neill's view that her version of Kant's Categorical Imperative, namely, the requirement of followability (RF), marks the supreme principle of reason; it takes issue with her claim that RF commits us to Kantian constructivism in practical philosophy. The paper distinguishes between two readings of RF: on a weak reading, RF ranges over all (practical) reasoning but does not commit to constructivism, and on a strong version RF commits to constructivism but fails to meet its own test, (...)
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  17.  2
    Horace M. Kallen's Use of Evolutionary Theory in Support of American Jews and Democracy.Matthew Kaufman - 2017 - Zygon 52 (4):922-942.
    This article examines the rhetorical deployment of Darwinian natural selection by the Jewish social philosopher Horace M. Kallen, in what is now widely regarded as the first articulation of cultural pluralism, “Democracy versus the Melting-Pot”. My analysis proceeds in two steps. First, I identify specific strategies by means of which Kallen endeavored to insert his ideas more deeply into national discourse. I also trace reactions to his essay in the Jewish press, and argue that these indicate ongoing conversations concerning (...)
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  18. The Legacy of Horace M. Kallen.Horace Meyer Kallen & Milton Ridvas Konvitz - 1987
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  19.  5
    Freedom and Experience: Essays Presented to Horace M. Kallen.Horace Meyer Kallen, Sidney Hook & Milton Ridvas Konvitz (eds.) - 1947 - Cooper Square Publishers.
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  20. Freedom and Experience Essays Presented to Horace M. Kallen.Kallen Horace Meyer, Hook Sidney, Konvitz Milton Ridvas & York N. Y.) New School for Social Research - 1947 - Cornell University Press.
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  21.  1
    Horace, Epistles 2.1.31: A Textual Note.Boris Kayachev - forthcoming - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption.
    Journal Name: Philologus Issue: Ahead of print.
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  22.  24
    Against Reductionist Explanations of Human Behaviour: John O'Neill.John O'Neill - 1998 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):173-188.
    [John Dupré] This paper attacks some prominent contemporary attempts to provide reductive accounts of ever wider areas of human behaviour. In particular, I shall address the claims of sociobiology (or evolutionary psychology) to provide a universal account of human nature, and attempts to subsume ever wider domains of behaviour within the scope of economics. I shall also consider some recent suggestions as to how these approaches might be integrated. Having rejected the imperialistic ambitions of these approaches, I shall briefly advocate (...)
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  23.  1
    Bertrand Russell, A.S. Neill, Homer Lane, W.H. Kilpatrick Four Progressive Educators.Leslie R. Perry - 1967 - Collier-Macmillan Macmillan.
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  24.  1
    Sidonius Apollinaris and Horace, Ars Poetica 14–23.Aaron Pelttari - 2016 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 160 (2):322-336.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Philologus Jahrgang: 160 Heft: 2 Seiten: 322-336.
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  25.  1
    Vision & Action. Essays in Honor of Horace M. Kallen on His 70th Birthday.Sidney Ratner - 1954 - Journal of Philosophy 51 (16):474-478.
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  26. Vision [and] Action, Essays in Honor of Horace M. Kallen on His 70th Birthday.Ratner Sidney - 1953 - Rutgers University Press.
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  27. Eugene O'Neill and Oriental Thought a Divided Vision.James A. Robinson - 1982
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  28.  17
    Ragion pratica e normatività. Il costruttivismo kantiano di Rawls, Korsgaard e O'Neill.Gianluca Verrucci - 2010 - Mimesis.
  29. Freedom and Experience Essays Presented to Horace M. Kallen.N. New School for Social Research York & Sidney Hook - 1947 - Cornell Univ. Press.
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  30.  65
    Autonomy in Medical Ethics After O'Neill.G. M. Stirrat - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (3):127-130.
    Next SectionFollowing the influential Gifford and Reith lectures by Onora O’Neill, this paper explores further the paradigm of individual autonomy which has been so dominant in bioethics until recently and concurs that it is an aberrant application and that conceptions of individual autonomy cannot provide a sufficient and convincing starting point for ethics within medical practice. We suggest that revision of the operational definition of patient autonomy is required for the twenty first century. We follow O’Neill in recommending (...)
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  31. What Should Egalitarians Believe If They Really Are Egalitarian? A Reply to Martin O'Neill.Alexander Brown - 2014 - European Journal of Political Theory 13 (4):453-469.
    In his article, ‘What Should Egalitarians Believe?’, Martin O’Neill argues, amongst other things, that egalitarians should reject both Telic and Deontic Egalitarianism and that they should adopt in their place a version of Non-Intrinsic Egalitarianism, specifically, the Pluralist Non-Intrinsic Egalitarian View. The central purpose of my article is to challenge O’Neill’s assumption that he can defend each of the various propositions that make up his position simultaneously. I do this with two arguments. First, I argue that in order (...)
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  32. Goldstick and O'Neill on "Truer Than".Ilkka Niiniluoto - 1991 - Philosophy of Science 58 (3):491-495.
    In a recent article, Goldstick and O'Neill propose a definition for the comparative "truer than" relation between rival propositions. This definition is studied here in a context where the concept of "convexity" is well defined for propositions. It turns out that the Goldstick-O'Neill definition gives a reasonable but very restricted sufficient condition for the "truer than" relation, but fails as a necessary condition.
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  33.  91
    Putting a New Spin on Galaxies: Horace W. Babcock, the Andromeda Nebula, and the Dark Matter Revolution.William L. Vanderburgh - unknown
    When a scientist is the first to perform a difficult type of observation and correctly interprets the result as a significant challenge to then-widely accepted core theories, and the result is later recognized as seminal work in a field of major importance, it is a surprise to find that that work was essentially ignored by the scientific community for thirty years. Such was the fate of the doctoral research on the rotations of the Andromeda Nebula (M31) conducted by Horace (...)
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  34. Normative Principles and Practical Ethics: A Response to O'Neill.Kimberley Brownlee - 2009 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (3):231-237.
    abstract This article briefly examines Onora O'Neill's account of the relation between normative principles and practical ethical problems with an eye to suggesting that philosophers of practical ethics have reason to adopt fairly high moral ambitions to be edifying and instructive both as educators and as advisors on public policy debates.
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  35. Kantian Constructivism, the Issue of Scope, and Perfectionism: O'Neill on Ethical Standing.Thomas M. Besch - 2011 - European Journal of Philosophy 19 (1):1-20.
    Kantian constructivists accord a constitutive, justificatory role to the issue of scope: they typically claim that first-order practical thought depends for its authority on being suitably acceptable within the right scope, or by all relevant others, and some Kantian constructivists, notably Onora O'Neill, hold that our views of the nature and criteria of practical reasoning also depend for their authority on being suitably acceptable within the right scope. The paper considers whether O'Neill-type Kantian constructivism can coherently accord this (...)
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  36.  1
    Horace, Carmen 4.2.53–60: Another Look at the Vitulus.Jacqueline Klooster - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (1):346-352.
    Carmen 4.2 is one of the most commented upon of the odes of Horace. It is indeed a complex poem. To summarize roughly: addressing the young poet Iullus Antonius, Horace presents the dangers of emulating Pindar, offering what seems like a lengthy description as well as an approximation of Pindar's own poetic style . Not as a doomed Icarus imitating the grand Pindaric swan, but in his own preferred mode, like a bee on the banks of Tibur, (...) will continue to produce his own highly refined poems on a small scale . Iullus Antonius, on the other hand, will sing of Augustus’ triumph maiore plectro . Modestly, Horace himself will be content to join in with the popular chants for Augustus’ triumphal return as one happy civilian among the crowd . Iullus Antonius will moreover offer a grand sacrifice of ten bulls and as many cows on that occasion, whereas Horace promises a single bull-calf that he is saving especially for the purpose . I will try to offer a new interpretation of these last two strophes by pointing out an unnoticed allusion to a Hellenistic subtext. (shrink)
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  37.  14
    Rational Trust: An Interview with Onora O’Neill.Axel Seemann - 2008 - Philosophy of Management 6 (2):3-8.
    Onora O’Neill was Principal of Newnham College, Cambridge from 1992 to 2006. She studied philosophy, psychology and physiology at Oxford and earned a PhD from Harvard, with John Rawls as supervisor. She taught at Barnard College, the women’s college at Columbia University, New York, before taking up a post at the University of Essex, where she became Professor of Philosophy in 1987. She lectures in the faculties of Philosophy and History and Philosophy of Science at Cambridge, and has written (...)
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  38.  9
    Onora O’Neill: Justice Across Boundaries: Whose Obligations?Gavin Morrison - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (3):675-677.
    This review sets out the central arguments of Onora O’Neill’s book Justice Across Boundaries: Whose Obligations? and argues that whilst she puts forward a variety of incisive criticisms of the international human rights movement she fails to present any positive argument for improving it. Ultimately the book is an exceptional piece of criticism that lacks any significant attempt to solve the many problems that O'Neill highlighted.
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  39.  18
    Constructivism All the Way Down – Can O’Neill Succeed Where Rawls Failed?Kerstin Budde - 2009 - Contemporary Political Theory 8 (2):199-223.
    While universalist theories have come under increasing attack from relativist and post-modern critics, such as Walzer, MacIntyre and Rorty, Kantian constructivism can be seen as a saviour of universalist ethics. Kantian constructivists accept the criticism that past universalist theories were foundational and philosophically comprehensive and thus contestable, but dispute that universalist principles are unattainable. The question then arises if Kantian constructivism can deliver a non-foundational justification of universal principles. Rawls, the first Kantian constructivist, has seemingly retreated from the universalist ambitions (...)
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  40.  16
    Constructivism All the Way Down |[Ndash]| Can O|[Rsquo]|Neill Succeed Where Rawls Failed|[Quest]|.Kerstin Budde - 2009 - Contemporary Political Theory 8 (2):199.
    While universalist theories have come under increasing attack from relativist and post-modern critics, such as Walzer, MacIntyre and Rorty, Kantian constructivism can be seen as a saviour of universalist ethics. Kantian constructivists accept the criticism that past universalist theories were foundational and philosophically comprehensive and thus contestable, but dispute that universalist principles are unattainable. The question then arises if Kantian constructivism can deliver a non-foundational justification of universal principles. Rawls, the first Kantian constructivist, has seemingly retreated from the universalist ambitions (...)
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  41.  2
    Future Generations: Present Harms: John O'Neill.John O'neill - 1993 - Philosophy 68 (263):35-51.
    There is a special problem with respect to our obligations to future generations which is that we can benefit or harm them but that they cannot benefit or harm us. Goodin summarizes the point well: No analysis of intergenerational justice that is cast even vaguely in terms of reciprocity can hope to succeed. The reason is the one which Addison… puts into the mouth of an Old Fellow of College, who when he was pressed by the Society to come into (...)
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  42.  28
    An American Edition and Translation of Horace Horace, Edited with Explanatory Notes by Thomas Chase, LL.D. Philadelphia, Eldredge and Brother. Revised Edition, 1892; 1 Doll. 10c. Text Pp. 1—252, Notes 253—458. The Odes and Epodes of Horace, Translated Into English Verse with an Introduction and Notes and Latin Text by John B. Hague, Ph. D. New York: G. B. Putnam's Sons, 1892. [REVIEW]T. E. Page - 1892 - The Classical Review 6 (08):354-357.
    Horace, edited with Explanatory Notes by Thomas Chase, LL.D. Philadelphia, Eldredge and Brother. Revised Edition, 1892; 1 doll. 10c. Text pp. 1—252, Notes 253—458.The Odes and Epodes of Horace, translated into English Verse with an Introduction and Notes and Latin Text by John B. Hague, Ph. D. New York: G. B. Putnam's Sons, 1892.
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  43.  11
    Environmental Ethics – Values or Obligations? A Reply to O'Neill.Brian Baxter - 1999 - Environmental Values 8 (1):107 - 112.
    Onora O'Neill recently argued that environmental ethics could and should be reformulated in terms of a search for the obligations held by moral agents towards each other, with respect to the non-human world. The more popular alternative, which seeks to establish the intrinsic value of the non-human, is plagued with various theoretical difficulties attaching to the concept of value. It is here argued that O'Neill's attempt to determine fundamental obligations of moral agents on the basis of a non-universalisability (...)
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  44.  2
    Environmental Ethics - Values or Obligations? A Reply to O'Neill.B. Baxter - 1999 - Environmental Values 8 (1):107-112.
    Onora O'Neill recently argued that environmental ethics could and should be reformulated in terms of a search for the obligations held by moral agents towards each other, with respect to the non-human world. The more popular alternative, which seeks to establish the intrinsic value of the non-human, is plagued with various theoretical difficulties attaching to the concept of value. It is here argued that O'Neill's attempt to determine fundamental obligations of moral agents on the basis of a non-universalisability (...)
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  45.  2
    Verse-Technique and Moral Extremism in Two Satires of Horace (Sermones 2.3 and 2.4)1.Kirk Freudenburg - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (01):196-.
    Horace begins his second book of satires by picturing himself caught between the extremes of two sets of critics, one group claiming that his poetry is too aggressive , the other that it is insipid and lacklustre . The charges are extreme and contradictory, so there is no way he can adjust his work to please one group without further antagonizing the other: the more straightforward he becomes in his criticisms, the more bitter and ‘lawless ’ he will seem (...)
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  46.  7
    Horace, Carm. 3.30.1–51.B. J. Gibson - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (01):312-.
    In the poem which sets the seal on his three books of odes, Horace declares that his monument to himself will be more durable than bronze and higher than the pyramids. As T. E. Page noted in his commentary, aere can suggest not only bronze tablets, but also commemorative statuary, although tablets seems more to the fore here, given the reference to monumentum As for the pyramids, they are a fine example of grandiloquent architecture, but of a kind which (...)
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  47.  14
    Feminist Justice and the Case of Undocumented Migrant Women and Children: A Critical Dialog with Benhabib, Nussbaum, Young, and O'Neill.Ilsup Ahn - 2014 - Journal of Global Ethics 10 (2):199-215.
    In recent years, scholars and researchers have discovered a new trend in the migration of unauthorized people into the United States: while the total numbers of unaccompanied migrant children crossing the border have grown exponentially in the past few years, human rights violations against migrant women have also increased significantly. This unfortunate trend is not unrelated to the intensifying border militarization and the criminalization of all unauthorized migrants. This paper attempts to provide an ethical solution to the political conundrum of (...)
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  48.  11
    A Stroll with Lucilius: Horace, Satires 1.9 Reconsidered.Jennifer L. Ferriss-Hill - 2011 - American Journal of Philology 132 (3):429-455.
    This article argues that the "bore" who pursues Horace in Satires 1.9 should be read as Lucilius, the inventor of Roman verse Satire. This reconsideration of the interlocutor allows certain previously puzzling aspects of the poem, in particular Horace's failure to escape from his companion, to be understood in programmatic terms. The poem literally enacts the complex and timeless dance between successor and model: as long as he is writing satire, Horace cannot be free of Lucilius' presence, (...)
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  49.  7
    The Use of the Singular Nos by Horace.Elsie Hancock - 1925 - Classical Quarterly 19 (1):43-55.
    The object of this paper is to enquire how far we can trace in the works of Horace the use of the plural forms of the first person which have been pointed out by Professor R. S. Conway in his essay on The Use of the Singular nos in Cicero's Letters , from which it appeared that the idiom throws valuable light upon the inner workings of Cicero's mind.
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  50.  6
    Horace and the Moral Function of Poetry.J. Tate - 1928 - Classical Quarterly 22 (2):65-72.
    The modern admirers of Horace who take him seriously as a moralist are inclined to attribute an undue degree of originality to his views on the moral function of poetry. The conception of the poet as teacher was, of course, the traditional Greek view. But Professor A. Y. Campbell thinks—in spite of ‘passages from Strabo and Plutarch’ —that this conception ‘after the days of Plato and Aristophanes lapsed as completely as did the production of the sort of literature that (...)
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