Results for 'Horror'

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Bibliography: Horror Film in Aesthetics
  1. Horror and Mood.Andrea Sauchelli - 2014 - American Philosophical Quarterly 51 (1):39-50.
    Horror is a popular genre or style in many different forms of art. In this essay I propose a definition of horror that is meant to capture our intuitions about the extension of this category over a variety of forms of art. In particular, I claim that horror is individuated by a specific atmosphere and mood, rather than by any singular entity in the horror representation.
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  2.  89
    Horror and Hedonic Ambivalence.Matthew Strohl - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):203-212.
    I argue that a solution to the paradox of horror should accommodate the possibility of enjoying an aesthetic experience partly in virtue of its being painful. This possibility is typically thought to be ruled out by the very nature of pleasure and pain. I argue that this is not so for adverbial accounts of pleasure. Using Aristotle's theory of pleasure as an example of an adverbial account, I show that it is possible for to enjoy an aesthetic experience partly (...)
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  3. Horror Films and the Argument From Reactive Attitudes.Scott Woodcock - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (2):309-324.
    Are horror films immoral? Gianluca Di Muzio argues that horror films of a certain kind are immoral because they undermine the reactive attitudes that are responsible for human agents being disposed to respond compassionately to instances of victimization. I begin with this argument as one instance of what I call the Argument from Reactive Attitudes (ARA), and I argue that Di Muzio’s attempt to identify what is morally suspect about horror films must be revised to provide the (...)
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  4.  16
    Horrorism: Naming Contemporary Violence.Adriana Cavarero - 2008 - Columbia University Press.
    In this brilliant book, one of the world's most provocative feminist theorists and political philosophers introduces a new word? horrorism?to capture the experience of violence.
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  5. Horror, Fear, and the Sartrean Account of Emotions.Andreas Elpidorou - 2016 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 54 (2):209-225.
    Phenomenological approaches to affectivity have long recognized the vital role that emotions occupy in our lives. In this paper, I engage with Jean-Paul Sartre's well-known and highly influential theory of the emotions as it is advanced in his Sketch for a Theory of the Emotions. I examine whether Sartre's account offers two inconsistent explications of the nature of emotions. I argue that despite appearances there is a reading of Sartre's theory that is free of inconsistencies. Ultimately, I highlight a novel (...)
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  6.  1
    Metaphysical Horror.Leszek Kołakowski - 2001 - University of Chicago Press.
    For over a century, philosophers have argued that philosophy is impossible or useless, or both. Although the basic notion dates back to the days of Socrates, there is still heated disagreement about the nature of truth, reality, knowledge, the good, and God. This may make little practical difference to our lives, but it leaves us with a feeling of radical uncertainty, a feeling described by Kolakowski as "metaphysical horror." "The horror is this," he says, "if nothing truly exists (...)
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  7. Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection.Julia Kristeva - 1984 - Columbia University Press.
  8. The Philosophy of Horror: Or, Paradoxes of the Heart.Noel Carroll - 1990 - Routledge.
    Noel Carroll, film scholar and philosopher, offers the first serious look at the aesthetics of horror. In this book he discusses the nature and narrative structures of the genre, dealing with horror as a "transmedia" phenomenon. A fan and serious student of the horror genre, Carroll brings to bear his comprehensive knowledge of obscure and forgotten works, as well as of the horror masterpieces. Working from a philosophical perspective, he tries to account for how people can (...)
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  9. Horror and Humor.Noël Carroll - 1999 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (2):145-160.
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  10. "The Horror of Darkness": Toward an Unhuman Phenomenology.Dylan Trigg - 2013 - Speculations:113-121.
    Emmanuel Levinas is often thought of as a philosopher of ethics, above all else. Indeed, his notions of the face, the Other, and alterity have all earned him a distinguished place in the history of phenomenology as a fundamental thinker of ethics as a first philosophy. But what has been overlooked in this attention on ethics is the early work of Levinas, which reveals him less a philosopher of the Other and more as a philosopher of elemental and anonymous being, (...)
     
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  11.  62
    Real Horror.Robert C. Solomon - 2003 - In Steven Jay Schneider & Daniel Shaw (eds.), Dark Thoughts: Philosophic Reflections on Cinematic Horror. Scarecrow Press.
    Horror is not the same as fear, and while fear contains an essential action tendency horror does not. And while we can enjoy fear there is no enjoying of horror.
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  12. The Philosophy of Horror or Paradoxes of the Heart.Noel Carroll - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (165):519.
    Noel Carroll, film scholar and philosopher, offers the first serious look at the aesthetics of horror. In this book he discusses the nature and narrative structures of the genre, dealing with horror as a "transmedia" phenomenon. A fan and serious student of the horror genre, Carroll brings to bear his comprehensive knowledge of obscure and forgotten works, as well as of the horror masterpieces. Working from a philosophical perspective, he tries to account for how people can (...)
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  13.  13
    Horror Vacui: Metaphysical Yogācāra Reaction to Madhyamaka Antimetaphysical Emptiness.Giuseppe Ferraro - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (3):401-426.
    In the first part of this paper I critically examine some of the main interpretations of “classical” Yogācāra philosophy of Maitreya, Asaṅga and Vasubandhu. Among these interpretations, based on extant textual and contextual data, I consider philologically unlikely both metaphysical-idealistic readings, which ascribe to these authors the view that ultimate reality is a mental or subjective stuff, and epistemological-idealistic readings which advocate that either Yogācāra suspends judgment on the existence of the extramental or that it maintains that the extramental exists (...)
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  14.  30
    Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection.Deborah Linderman, Julia Kristeva & Leon S. Roudiez - 1984 - Substance 13 (3/4):140.
  15. Horror.Aaron Smuts - 2008 - In Paisley Livingston & Carl Plantinga (eds.), Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film.
    Three questions have occupied much of the philosophical literature on cinematic horror: What is horror? How is it able to frighten and disgust? Why do we seek out horror if it horrifies? Although there are numerous other important topics, this entry will focus on these three general questions, since they motivate the overwhelming majority of the philosophical writing on cinematic horror.
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  16.  6
    Cruelty, Horror, and the Will to Redemption.Lynne S. Arnault - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):155-188.
    Americans cherish the idea that good eventually triumphs over evil. After briefly arguing that a proper understanding of the moral harm of cruelty calls into question the credibility of popular American idioms of redemption, I argue that the epistemic dynamics of horror help account for the commanding grip of this rhetoric on the popular imagination, and I suggest that this idiom has morally problematic features that warrant the attention of feminists.
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  17.  63
    Cruelty, Horror, and the Will to Redemption.Lynne S. Arnault - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):155-188.
    : Americans cherish the idea that good eventually triumphs over evil. After briefly arguing that a proper understanding of the moral harm of cruelty calls into question the credibility of popular American idioms of redemption, I argue that the epistemic dynamics of horror help account for the commanding grip of this rhetoric on the popular imagination, and I suggest that this idiom has morally problematic features that warrant the attention of feminists.
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  18.  15
    Power, Horror and Ambivalence.Daniel Shaw - 2001 - Film and Philosophy (Special Edition on Horror):1-12.
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  19.  24
    Horror Movies and the Cognitive Ecology of Primary Metaphors.Bodo Winter - 2014 - Metaphor and Symbol 29 (3):151-170.
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  20. Enjoying Horror Fictions: A Reply to Gaut.Noël Carroll - 1995 - British Journal of Aesthetics 35 (1):67-72.
  21. Christ and Horrors: The Coherence of Christology.[author unknown] - 2008 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 64 (3):161-165.
  22.  13
    Horror sanguinis.David Livingstone Smith & Ioana Panaitiu - 2016 - Common Knowledge 22 (1):69-80.
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  23.  34
    Moral Horror and the Sacred.Robert Merrihew Adams - 1995 - Journal of Religious Ethics 23 (2):201 - 224.
    The sense of moral horror at certain deeds and the related idea of the sacred have not been given as central a place in ethical theory, theological or secular, as they have in our moral consciousness. I place them in a broader theological metaethics, in a way that I hope avoids mere taboo and provides for a rational critique of our responses. Moral horror is understood here in terms of violation of the sacred, and the sacred is understood (...)
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  24. The Horror of Tradition or How to Burn Babylon and Build Benin While Reading A'preface to a Twenty-Volume Suicide Note'.Leonard Harris - 1993 - Philosophical Forum 24 (1-3):94-118.
     
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  25. Horror and the Idea of Everyday Life: On Skeptical Threats in Psycho and the Birds.Philip J. Nickel - 2010 - In Thomas Richard Fahy (ed.), The Philosophy of Horror. University Press of Kentucky. pp. 14--32.
  26.  23
    Awe or Horror: Differentiating Two Emotional Responses to Schema Incongruence.Pamela Marie Taylor & Yukiko Uchida - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1548-1561.
    ABSTRACTExperiences that contradict one's core concepts elicit intense emotions. Such schema incongruence can elicit awe, wherein experiences that are too vast...
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  27. The Paradox of Horror.Berys Gaut - 1993 - British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (4):333-345.
  28.  31
    Nietzsche and the Horror of Existence.Philip J. Kain - 2009 - Lexington Books.
    Nietzsche believed in the horror of existence: a world filled with meaningless suffering_suffering for no reason at all. He also believed in eternal recurrence, the view that that our lives will repeat infinitely, and that in each life every detail will be exactly the same. Furthermore, it was not enough for Nietzsche that eternal recurrence simply be accepted_he demanded that it be loved. Thus the philosopher who introduces eternal recurrence is the very same philosopher who also believes in the (...)
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  29.  42
    The Horror of Ethnocentrism: Westernization, Cultural Difference, and Strife in Understanding Non-Western Pasts in Historical Studies.Jörn Rüsen - 2008 - History and Theory 47 (2):261–269.
  30.  51
    A Humean Definition of Horror.Daniel Shaw - 1997 - Film-Philosophy 1 (1).
    on The Philosophy of Horror by Noel Carroll.
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  31.  37
    On Coercion, Love, and Horrors.Thomas M. Crisp - 2013 - Religious Studies 49 (2):165-179.
    In this article, I explain and critique J. L. Schellenberg's atheological argument from horrors. I raise an epistemic objection, arguing that no one could be justified in believing its conclusion on the basis of its premises. Then I adumbrate a notion of the divine which is different in various ways from the God of classical theism and argue that Schellenberg's argument makes no trouble for belief in the existence of God so construed.
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  32. The Immorality of Horror Films.Gianluca Di Muzio - 2006 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):277-294.
    With the exception of pornography, the morality of popular forms of entertainment has not been studied extensively by philosophers. The present paper aims to start discussion on the moral status of horror films, whose popularity and success has grown steadily since the 1970s. In particular, the author focuses on so-called “slasher” or “gorefest” films, where the narration revolves around the graphic and realistic depiction of a series of murders. The paper’s main thesis is that it is immoral to produce, (...)
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  33.  55
    Torture Porn: Popular Horror After Saw.Steve Jones - 2013 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Torture Porn is a term that has generated a great deal of controversy during the last decade, critics utilizing the term to dismiss contemporary popular horror cinema as obscene and morally depraved. Arguing primarily in defense of torture-themed horror films, this book seeks to offer a critical overview and examination of the Torture Porn phenomenon, discussing the generic contexts in which it is situated, scrutinizing press responses to the sub-genre, and offering narrative analyses of the sub-genre’s central films; (...)
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  34.  54
    Economic Epistemology: Hopes and Horrors.Uskali Mäki - 2005 - Episteme 1 (3):211-222.
    The cultural and epistemic status of science is under attack. Social and cultural studies of science are widely perceived to offer evidence and arguments in support of an anti-science campaign. They portray science as a mundane social endeavour, akin to religion and politics, with no privileged access to truthful information about the real world. Science is under threat and needs defence. Old philosophical legitimations have lost their bite. Alarm bells ring, new troops have to be mobilised. Call economics, the good (...)
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  35. The Immorality of Horror Films.Gianluca Di Muzio - 2006 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):277-294.
    With the exception of pornography, the morality of popular forms of entertainment has not been studied extensively by philosophers. The present paper aims to start discussion on the moral status of horror films, whose popularity and success has grown steadily since the 1970s. In particular, the author focuses on so-called “slasher” or “gorefest” films, where the narration revolves around the graphic and realistic depiction of a series of murders. The paper’s main thesis is that it is immoral to produce, (...)
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  36.  29
    The Philosophy of Horror, or Paradoxes of the Heart.Mary Devereaux - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (4):950.
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  37. On the Horror of Phenomenology: Lovecraft and Husserl.Graham Harman - 2008 - Collapse:333-364.
  38. The Philosophy of Horror.Thomas Richard Fahy (ed.) - 2010 - University Press of Kentucky.
    Inviting readers to ponder this genre's various manifestations since the late 1700s, this collection of probing essays allows fans and philosophy buffs alike to ...
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  39. Nietzsche, Virtue and the Horror of Existence.Philip J. Kain - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):153 – 167.
    The article focuses on philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche's commitment to a virtue ethic and his belief in the horror of existence. It talks about the Nietzsche view on the need to construct a meaning for suffering in order to obscure the meaninglessness of existence. The philosophical implications that follow from the horror of existence and the need for virtue to be compatible with happiness are discussed. The article also explores the need for power to create and maintain illusions related (...)
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  40.  4
    Gratitude, Anger and the Horror of Asymmetry.Thomas Nisters - 2021 - Zeitschrift Für Ethik Und Moralphilosophie 4 (1):143-147.
    This paper puts two propositions to the test: First, gratitude and active ingratitude are in one sense opposed, yet in another sense they bear a striking resemblance. Second, mature morality sometimes expects us to transcend the quid pro quo structure implied by common gratitude.
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  41.  20
    As If Consenting to Horror.Emmanuel Levinas & Paula Wissing - 1989 - Critical Inquiry 15 (2):485-488.
    I learned very early, perhaps even before 1933 and certainly after Hitler’s huge success at the time of his election to the Reichstag, of Heidegger’s sympathy toward National Socialism. It was the late Alexandre Koyré who mentioned it to me for the first time on his return from a trip to Germany. I could not doubt the news, but took it with stupor and disappointment, and also with the faint hope that it expressed only the temporary lapse of a great (...)
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  42. The Paradox of Horror: Fear as a Positive Emotion.Katerina Bantinaki - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (4):2012.
  43. The Nature of Horror.Noël Carroll - 1987 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 46 (1):51-59.
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  44.  20
    The Horror of Language: Irigaray and Heidegger.Maria Cimitile - 2001 - Philosophy Today 45 (9999):66-74.
  45. The Thing: A Phenomenology of Horror.Dylan Trigg - 2014 - Zero Books.
    What is the human body? Both the most familiar and unfamiliar of things, the body is the centre of experience but also the site of a prehistory anterior to any experience. Alien and uncanny, this other side of the body has all too often been overlooked by phenomenology. In confronting this oversight, Dylan Trigg’s The Thing redefines phenomenology as a species of realism, which he terms unhuman phenomenology. Far from being the vehicle of a human voice, this unhuman phenomenology gives (...)
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  46. Hardcore Horror: Challenging the Discourses of ‘Extremity’.Steve Jones - 2021 - In Eddie Falvey, Jonathan Wroot & Joe Hickinbottom (eds.), New Blood: Critical Approaches to Contemporary Horror. Cardiff, UK: pp. 35-51.
    This chapter explores the relationship between ‘hardcore’ horror films, and the discursive context in which mainstream horror releases are being dubbed ‘extreme’. This chapter compares ‘mainstream’ and ‘hardcore’ horror with the aim of investigating what ‘extremity’ means. I will begin by outlining what ‘hardcore’ horror is, and how it differs from mainstream horror (both in terms of content and distribution). I will then dissect what ‘extremity’ means in this context, delineating problems with established critical discourses (...)
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  47.  52
    Laughing Screaming: Modern Hollywood Horror and Comedy.William Paul - 1995 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (3):332-334.
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  48.  25
    God, Horrors, and Our Deepest Good.Bruce Langtry - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (1):77-95.
    J.L. Schellenberg argues that since God, if God exists, possesses both full knowledge by acquaintance of horrific suffering and also infinite compassion, the occurrence of horrific suffering is metaphysically incompatible with the existence of God. In this paper I begin by raising doubts about Schellenberg’s assumptions about divine knowledge by acquaintance and infinite compassion. I then focus on Schellenberg’s claim that necessarily, if God exists and the deepest good of finite persons is unsurpassably great and can be achieved without horrific (...)
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  49.  36
    “Nothing Short of a Horror Show”: Triggering Abjection of Street Workers in Western Canadian Newspapers.Caitlin Janzen, Susan Strega, Leslie Brown, Jeannie Morgan & Jeannine Carrière - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (1):142-162.
    Over the past decade, Canadian media coverage of street sex work has steadily increased. The majority of this interest pertains to graphic violence against street sex workers, most notably from Vancouver, British Columbia. In this article, the authors analyze newspaper coverage that appeared in western Canadian publications between 2006 and 2009. In theorizing the violence both depicted and perpetrated by newspapers, the authors propose an analytic framework capable of attending to the process of othering in all of its complexity. To (...)
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  50. Feminist Frameworks for Horror Films.Cynthia A. Freeland - 1996 - In David Bordwell Noel Carroll (ed.), Post-Theory: Reconstructing Film Studies. University of Wisconsin Press. pp. 195--218.
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