Results for 'Hortensius'

18 found
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  1.  21
    M. Hortensius M. F. Q,. N. Hortalus.Joseph Geiger - 1970 - The Classical Review 20 (02):132-134.
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  2. El Hortensius de Cicerón, la «filosofía» y la vida mundana del joven Agustín.F. B. A. Asiedu - 2000 - Augustinus 45 (176-77):5-25.
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  3.  15
    Cicero’s Hortensius and the Problem of Riches in Saint Augustine.Robert P. Russell - 1976 - Augustinian Studies 7:59-68.
  4.  13
    An Asianist Sensation: Horace on Lucilius as Hortensius.Ian Goh - 2018 - American Journal of Philology 139 (4):641-674.
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  5. Tres lecturas y una conversión: del" Hortensius" a la Epístola a los Romanos.José Oroz Reta - 1992 - Augustinus 37 (147-148):245-272.
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  6. Un Éclairage Nouveau du Fragment 104 (Grilli) de l' 'Hortensius' de Cicéron.Jean Doignon - 1983 - Hermes 111 (4):458-464.
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  7.  8
    Nuances esthétiques du stoïcisme chez Cicéron d'après un fragment de l''Hortensius' et un trait du 'De officiis'.Jean Doignon - 1985 - Hermes 113 (4):459-468.
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  8.  6
    XXVI. Zu Aristoteles’ Protreptikos und Cicero’s Hortensius.H. Diels - 1888 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 1 (4):477-497.
  9. Protrepticus. Aristotle, Monte Ransome Johnson & D. S. Hutchinson - manuscript
    A new translation and edition of Aristotle's Protrepticus (with critical comments on the fragments) -/- Welcome -/- The Protrepticus was an early work of Aristotle, written while he was still a member of Plato's Academy, but it soon became one of the most famous works in the whole history of philosophy. Unfortunately it was not directly copied in the middle ages and so did not survive in its own manuscript tradition. But substantial fragments of it have been preserved in several (...)
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  10.  75
    Intellect and Will in Augustine's Confessions*: DAN D. CRAWFORD.Dan D. Crawford - 1988 - Religious Studies 24 (3):291-302.
    Augustine tells us in the Confessions that his reading of Cicero's Hortensius at the age of nineteen aroused in him a burning ‘passion for the wisdom of eternal truth’. He was inspired ‘to love wisdom itself, whatever it might be, and to search for it, pursue it, hold it, and embrace it firmly’. And thus he embarked on his arduous journey to the truth, which was at the same time a conversion to Catholic Christianity, and which culminated twelve years (...)
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  11. Cicerón y Agustín de Hipona: Bien y Felicidad.Concepción A. Real - 2001 - Anuario Filosófico 34 (70):269-297.
    The author examines the outstanding texts in Saint Augustine's works about hapiness -specially in De beata uita, Confessiones, and De Trinitate-, in order to establish interlinking points with the Ciceronian books related to this subject. The Hortensius (specially frg. 36, 39 and 79 Müller), is a reiterated and coincident reference in the different Augustine's works. It also acts as a key into other many passages of the classical philosophical tradition. On the other hand, Augustin modifies and perfects elements there (...)
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  12.  6
    Self-Referential (or Performative) Inconsistency: Its Significance for Truth.John Finnis - 2004 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 78:13-22.
    Augustine was undeniably a dogmatic thinker, but he also had an “aporetic side” which makes him more relevant to Christian philosophers today than isgenerally recognized. Augustine’s first experience of reading philosophy came from Cicero’s Hortensius, from which Augustine gained an appreciation for philosophical scepticism which he never lost. Thus, in all of his works and in all periods of his life, Augustine’s characteristic way of doing philosophy is aporetic, rather than either systematic or speculative. Paradoxically, Augustine’s faith in the (...)
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  13.  42
    The Aporetic Augustine.Gareth Matthews - 2004 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 78:23-39.
    Augustine was undeniably a dogmatic thinker, but he also had an “aporetic side” which makes him more relevant to Christian philosophers today than isgenerally recognized. Augustine’s first experience of reading philosophy came from Cicero’s Hortensius, from which Augustine gained an appreciation for philosophical scepticism which he never lost. Thus, in all of his works and in all periods of his life, Augustine’s characteristic way of doing philosophy is aporetic, rather than either systematic or speculative. Paradoxically, Augustine’s faith in the (...)
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  14.  16
    Self-Referential (or Performative) Inconsistency: Its Significance for Truth.John Finnis - 2004 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 78:13-22.
    Augustine was undeniably a dogmatic thinker, but he also had an “aporetic side” which makes him more relevant to Christian philosophers today than isgenerally recognized. Augustine’s first experience of reading philosophy came from Cicero’s Hortensius, from which Augustine gained an appreciation for philosophical scepticism which he never lost. Thus, in all of his works and in all periods of his life, Augustine’s characteristic way of doing philosophy is aporetic, rather than either systematic or speculative. Paradoxically, Augustine’s faith in the (...)
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  15. La Influencia Del Diálogo "Hortensio" de Cicerón En S. Agustín.María del Carmen Dolby Múgica - 2001 - Anuario Filosófico 34 (70):555-564.
    One of the fundamental events in the life of Saint Augustine was its encounter with Cicero. The reading of the dialogue Hortensius led St. Augustine to study Philosophy. Cicero provided him with a vague concept of Wisdom that made him see that happiness is not in the material but in the spiritual world. However Saint Augustine was disappointed by the probabilism of Cicero in subjects as important as God, the immortality of human soul..., questions on which the Christian doctrine (...)
     
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  16.  5
    The Aporetic Augustine.Gareth Matthews - 2004 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 78:23-39.
    Augustine was undeniably a dogmatic thinker, but he also had an “aporetic side” which makes him more relevant to Christian philosophers today than isgenerally recognized. Augustine’s first experience of reading philosophy came from Cicero’s Hortensius, from which Augustine gained an appreciation for philosophical scepticism which he never lost. Thus, in all of his works and in all periods of his life, Augustine’s characteristic way of doing philosophy is aporetic, rather than either systematic or speculative. Paradoxically, Augustine’s faith in the (...)
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  17.  9
    Lucius Memmius And His Family.T. P. Wiseman - 1967 - Classical Quarterly 17 (01):164-.
    Sisenna Historiarum lib. iii: Lucium Memmium, socerum Gai Scriboni, tribunum plebis, quern Marci Livi consiliarium fuisse callebant et tune Gurionis oratorem … . Erat Hortensius in bello primo anno miles, altero tribunus militum, Sulpicius legatus; aberat etiam M. Antonius; exercebatur una lege iudicium Varia, ceteris propter bellum intermissis; cui frequens aderam, quamquam pro se ipsi dicebant oratores non illi quidem principes, L. Memmius et Q. Pompeius, sed oratores tamen, teste diserto utique [Jahn: MSS. uterque] Philippo, cuius in testimonio contentio (...)
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  18.  9
    An Anthology of Early Latin Epigrams? A Ghost Reconsidered.Amiel D. Vardi - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (01):147-.
    In Book 19, chapter 9 of the Nodes Atticae Gellius describes the birthday party of a young Greek of equestrian rank at which a group of professional singers entertained the guests by performing poems by Anacreon, Sappho, ‘et poetarum quoque recentium λεγεα quaedam erotica’ . After the singing, Gellius goes on, some of the Greek συμπόται present challenged Roman achievements in erotic poetry, excepting only Catullus and Calvus, and criticized in particular Laevius, Hortensius, Cinna, and Memmius. Rising to meet (...)
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