Results for 'Hospice'

164 found
Order:
  1.  30
    The Significance of Lifeworld and the Case of Hospice.Lisbeth Thoresen, Trygve Wyller & Kristin Heggen - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (3):257-263.
    Questions on what it means to live and die well are raised and discussed in the hospice movement. A phenomenological lifeworld perspective may help professionals to be aware of meaningful and important dimensions in the lives of persons close to death. Lifeworld is not an abstract philosophical term, but rather the opposite. Lifeworld is about everyday, common life in all its aspects. In the writings of Cicely Saunders, known as the founder of the modern hospice movement, facets of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  25
    Hospice Ethics: Policy and Practice in Palliative Care.Timothy Kirk & Bruce Jennings (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    This book identifies and explores ethical themes in the structure and delivery of hospice care in the United States. As the fastest growing sector in the US healthcare system, in which over forty percent of patients who die each year receive care in their final weeks of life, hospice care presents complex ethical opportunities and challenges for patients, families, clinicians, and administrators. Thirteen original chapters, written by seventeen hospice experts, offer guidance and analysis that promotes best ethical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  16
    Barriers to Physicians' Decisions to Discuss Hospice: Insights Gained From the United States Hospice Model.E. Kiernan McGorty & Brian H. Bornstein - 2003 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 9 (3):363-372.
  4.  10
    The Role of Palliative Medicine in ICU Bed Allocation in COVID-19: A Joint Position Statement of the Singapore Hospice Council and the Chapter of Palliative Medicine Physicians.Lalit Kumar Radha Krishna, Han Yee Neo, Elisha Wan Ying Chia, Kuang Teck Tay, Noreen Chan, Patricia Soek Hui Neo, Cynthia Goh, Tan Ying Peh, Min Chiam & James Alvin Yiew Hock Low - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (2):205-211.
    Facing the possibility of a surge of COVID-19-infected patients requiring ventilatory support in Intensive Care Units, the Singapore Hospice Council and the Chapter of Palliative Medicine Physicians forward its position on the guiding principles that ought to drive the allocation of ICU beds and its role in care of these patients and their families.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  26
    Acknowledged Dependence and the Virtues of Perinatal Hospice.Aaron D. Cobb - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (1):25-40.
    Prenatal screening can lead to the detection and diagnosis of significantly life-limiting conditions affecting the unborn child. Recognizing the difficulties facing parents who decide to continue the pregnancy, some have proposed perinatal hospice as a new modality of care. Although the medical literature has begun to devote significant attention to these practices, systematic philosophical reflection on perinatal hospice has been relatively limited. Drawing on Alasdair MacIntyre’s account of the virtues of acknowledged dependence, I contend that perinatal hospice (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6.  31
    In the Business of Dying: Questioning the Commercialization of Hospice.Joshua E. Perry & Robert C. Stone - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):224-234.
    This article critically questions the commercialization of hospice care and the ethical concerns associated with the industry's movement toward “market-driven medicine” at the end of life. For example, the article examines issues raised by an influx of for-profit hospice providers whose business model appears at its core to have an ethical conflict of interest between shareholders doing well and terminal patients dying well. Yet, empirical data analyzing the experience of patients across the hospice industry are limited, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  7.  28
    Morality and Moral Conflicts in Hospice Care: Results of a Qualitative Interview Study.S. Salloch & C. Breitsameter - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (10):588-592.
    Hospices consider themselves places that practise a holistic form of terminal care, encompassing physical and psychological symptoms, and also the social and spiritual support for a dying patient. So far, the underlying ethical principles have been treated predominantly in terms of a normative theoretical discussion. The interview study discussed in this paper is a qualitative investigation into general and hospice-related conceptions of morality among full-time and voluntary workers in German inpatient hospices. It examines moral conflicts and efforts leading to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  8.  45
    Selling Hospice.Sam Halabi - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (4):442-454.
    Americans are increasingly turning to hospice services to provide them with medical care, pain management, and emotional support at the end of life. The increase in the rates of hospice utilization is explained by a number of factors including a “hospice movement” dating to the 1970s which emphasized hospice as a tool to promote dignity for the terminally ill; coverage of hospice services by Medicare beginning in 1983; and, the market for hospice services provision, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9.  24
    Why Hospice Nurses Need High Self-Esteem.Olthuis Gert, Carlo Leget & Wim Dekkers - 2007 - Nursing Ethics 14 (1):62-71.
    This article discusses the relationship between personal and professional qualities in hospice nurses. We examine the notion of self-esteem in personal and professional identity. The focus is on two questions: (1) what is self-esteem, and how is it related to personal identity and its moral dimension? and (2) how do self-esteem and personal identity relate to the professional identity of nurses? We demonstrate it is important that the moral and personal goals in nurses' life coincide. If nurses' personal view (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10.  18
    The Caring Relationship in Hospice Care: An Analysis Based on the Ethics of the Caring Conversation.Gert Olthuis, Wim Dekkers, Carlo Leget & Paul Vogelaar - 2006 - Nursing Ethics 13 (1):29-40.
    Good nursing is more than exercising a specific set of skills. It involves the personal identity of the nurse. The aim of this article is to answer two questions: (1) what kind of person should the hospice nurse be? and (2) how should the hospice nurse engage in caring conversations? To answer these questions we analyse a nurse’s story that is intended to be a profile of an exemplary hospice nurse. This story was constructed from an analysis (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11.  63
    Elements of an Engaged Clinical Ethics: A Qualitative Analysis of Hospice Clinical Ethics Committee Discussions.G. Hunt, C. Gannon & A. Gallagher - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (4):175-182.
    Social, legal and health-care changes have created an increasing need for ethical review within end-of-life care. Multiprofessional clinical ethics committees (CECs) are increasingly supporting decision-making in hospitals and hospices. This paper reports findings from an analysis of formal summaries from CEC meetings, of one UK hospice, spanning four years. Using qualitative content analysis, five themes were identified: timeliness of decision-making, holistic care, contextual openness, values diversity and consensual understanding. The elements of an engaged clinical ethics in a hospice (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  38
    Hospice and Euthanasia in The Netherlands: An Ethical Point of View.R. J. Janssens, H. A. ten Have & Z. Zylicz - 1999 - Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (5):408-412.
    This contribution is a report of a two months' participant observation in a Dutch hospice. The goal of the observation was to gain an overview of moral decisions in a hospice in which euthanasia, a tolerated practice in the Netherlands, is not accepted as an option. In an introduction, the development of palliative care in the Netherlands will be briefly presented. Subsequently, various moral decisions that were taken during the participant observation are presented and analysed by means of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13.  8
    US Hospice Structure and its Implications for the “Right to Die” Debate: An Interdisciplinary Study of the “Feeling of Being a Burden to Others”.Harold Braswell - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):525-534.
    This article is an analysis of the relationship between US hospice structure and the feeling of being a burden to others. A goal of US hospice care is to reduce the FBO. But in America, hospice is limited in its ability to do so because of the high caregiver burden it places on family members of dying people. Through a historical study, I show that this burden was excessive when the hospice system was created and has (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  75
    The Good Death, Virtue, and Physician-Assisted Death: An Examination of the Hospice Way of Death.Franklin G. Miller - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (1):92.
    The problem of physician-assisted death, assisted suicide and active euthanasia, has been debated predominantly in the ethically familiar vocabulary of rights, duties, and consequences. Patient autonomy and the right to die with dignity vie with the duty of physicians to heal, but not to kill, and the specter of “the slippery slope” from voluntary euthanasia as a last resort for patients suffering from terminal illness to PAD on demand and mercy killing of “hopeless” incompetent patients. Another dimension of the debate (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  28
    Ethical Issues After the Disclosure of a Terminal Illness: Danish and Norwegian Hospice Nurses' Reflections.Margarethe Lorensen, Anne J. Davis, Emiko Konishi & Eli H. Bunch - 2003 - Nursing Ethics 10 (2):175-185.
    This research explored the ethical issues that nurses reported in the process of elaboration and further disclosure after an initial diagnosis of a terminal illness had been given. One hundred and six hospice nurses in Norway and Denmark completed a questionnaire containing 45 items of forced-choice and open-ended questions. This questionnaire was tested and used in three countries prior to this study; for this research it was tested on Danish and Norwegian nurses. All respondents supported the ethics of ongoing (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  1
    “Yes to Life” and the Expansion of Perinatal Hospice.Amy Kuebelbeck - 2020 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 63 (3):526-531.
    For those of us gathered expectantly in the frescoed 16th-century Clementine Hall in Vatican City on a brilliant spring morning in May 2019, it was a profound moment when Pope Francis spoke the words “perinatal hospice”. I wish all the medical professionals who have pioneered and developed this care over the last 25 years could have been in that majestic hall with us. Their cumulative work—along with the poignant stories of many families—is inspiring people around the globe and helping (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  47
    Kenneth J. Doka, Amy S. Tucci, Charles A. Corr, and Bruce Jennings : End-of-Life Ethics: A Case Study Approach: Hospice Foundation of America, Washington, DC, 2012, 281 Pp, $ 32.95 , ISBN: 978-1893-349148.William G. Hoy - 2014 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (5):395-399.
    As readers of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics undoubtedly know, edited books can be highly uneven in their quality, with some chapters excelling in content, depth, and readability while others languish in mediocrity. Volumes in an annually issued series run an even greater risk of suffering the plague of inferiority, especially after many years of fame and success. End-of-Life Ethics: A Case Study Approach clearly overcomes these maladies and provides readers with an excellent collection of well-written, thought-provoking essays.The Hospice Foundation (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  66
    Responses to “Goldilocks and Mrs. Ilych: A Critical Look at the 'Philosophy of Hospice'” (CQ Vol 6 No 3) by Felicia Ackerman. [REVIEW]Gretchen M. Brown - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (2):206-207.
    The critical look at hospice care by Felicia Ackerman in Vol. 6 of the CambridgeQuarterly requires a response, since the author presents her view as having major implications for health policy. As a healthcare executive with over 25 years experience, and as a spokesperson for both my own program and others in the National Hospice Work Group, twelve of the nation's largest nonprofit hospices, I submit that her analysis of hospice care is naive. Ackerman's lack of practical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Letting Go: Expanding the Transpersonal Dimension in Hospice Care and Education.Margaret Coberly & S. Shapiro - 1998 - International Journal of Transpersonal Studies 17 (2):35-56.
    As the hospice movement continues to grow, caregivers are increasingly required to interact with dying patients for longer periods and in more intimate and more meaningful ways. Practical models of competent and compassionate communication and understanding need to be developed to accommodate the changing environment of the patient and caregiver and their relationship. We therefore: examine current death education trends in hospice care and education; and describe the need for a more expansive and transpersonal view, and ways of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  53
    Goldilocks and Mrs. Ilych: A Critical Look at the “Philosophy of Hospice”.Felicia Ackerman - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (3):314-.
    Anyone who thinks contemporary American society is hopelessly contentious and lacking in shared values has probably not been paying attention to the way the popular media portray the hospice movement. Over and over, we are told such things as that “Humane care costs less than high-tech care and is what patients want and need,” that hospices are “the most effective and least expensive route to a dignified death,” that hospice personnel are “heroic,” that their “compassion and dedication seem (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  31
    Hospice with a Zen Twist: A Talk with Zen Hospice Founder Frank Ostaseski.Steve Heilig - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (3):322-325.
    Although housed in an anonymous Victorian house in San Francisco, California, the Zen Hospice Project is world renowned for its pioneering model of training hospice volunteers, providing direct services to patients, and offering educational programs to the broader public.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  2
    US Hospice Structure and its Implications for the “Right to Die” Debate: An Interdisciplinary Study of the “Feeling of Being a Burden to Others”.Harold Braswell - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):525-534.
    This article is an analysis of the relationship between US hospice structure and the feeling of being a burden to others. A goal of US hospice care is to reduce the FBO. But in America, hospice is limited in its ability to do so because of the high caregiver burden it places on family members of dying people. Through a historical study, I show that this burden was excessive when the hospice system was created and has (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  31
    Reflections on a Hospice Memorial Service.Steve Heilig - 2002 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (4):432-434.
    It's a chilly winter night outside, but very warm inside the hospice guest house. All of the people gathered here have wished one another “Happy New Year” and settled on cushions in the big meeting hall. Both fireplaces are lit, and the many little white cards with the names of each person who died last year are arranged on the mantels over the fireplaces and on a table in the center of the room. Paul, our teacher for the evening, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  13
    Goldilocks and Mrs. Ilych: A Critical Look at the “Philosophy of Hospice”.Felicia Ackerman - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (3):314-324.
    Anyone who thinks contemporary American society is hopelessly contentious and lacking in shared values has probably not been paying attention to the way the popular media portray the hospice movement. Over and over, we are told such things as that “Humane care costs less than high-tech care and is what patients want and need,” that hospices are “the most effective and least expensive route to a dignified death,” that hospice personnel are “heroic,” that their “compassion and dedication seem (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  21
    Hospice and Palliation in the English-Speaking Caribbean.Cheryl Cox Macpherson, Nina Chiochankitmun & Muge Akpinar-Elci - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (3):341-348.
    This article presents empirical data on the limited availability of hospice and palliative care to the 6 million people of the English-speaking Caribbean. Ten of the 13 nations therein responded to a survey and reported employing a total of 6 hospice or palliative specialists, and having a total of 15 related facilities. The evolving socioeconomic and cultural context in these nations bears on the availability of such care, and on the willingness to report, assess, and prioritize pain, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  2
    US Hospice Structure and its Implications for the “Right to Die” Debate: An Interdisciplinary Study of the “Feeling of Being a Burden to Others”.Harold Braswell - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):525-534.
    This article is an analysis of the relationship between US hospice structure and the feeling of being a burden to others. A goal of US hospice care is to reduce the FBO. But in America, hospice is limited in its ability to do so because of the high caregiver burden it places on family members of dying people. Through a historical study, I show that this burden was excessive when the hospice system was created and has (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  21
    A Request for Hospice Admission From Hospital to Withdraw Ventilation.C. Gannon - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):383-384.
    A request to admit a hospital inpatient with motor neurone disease to the hospice generated unusual unease. Significantly, withdrawal of ventilation had already been planned. The presumption that ventilation would be withdrawn after transfer presented a dilemma. Should the hospice accept the admission? If so, should the hospice staff stop the ventilation, and then when and how? Debate centred on the continuity of best interests and the logistics of withdrawing ventilation. The factors making the request contentious identified (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  1
    US Hospice Structure and its Implications for the “Right to Die” Debate: An Interdisciplinary Study of the “Feeling of Being a Burden to Others”.Harold Braswell - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):525-534.
    This article is an analysis of the relationship between US hospice structure and the feeling of being a burden to others. A goal of US hospice care is to reduce the FBO. But in America, hospice is limited in its ability to do so because of the high caregiver burden it places on family members of dying people. Through a historical study, I show that this burden was excessive when the hospice system was created and has (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Narrative Medicine in Hospice Care: Identity, Practice, and Ethics Though the Lens of Paul Ricoeur.Tara Flanagan - 2019 - Lexington Books.
    Narrative Medicine in Hospice Care argues that the models of selfhood and care found in the work of Paul Ricoeur can serve as a framework for clinicians, caregivers, and end-of-life patients regardless of the patients’ verbal and cognitive capabilities.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  13
    In the Business of Dying: Questioning the Commercialization of Hospice.Joshua E. Perry & Robert C. Stone - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):224-234.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  31.  25
    Hospice Comics: Representations of Patient and Family Experience of Illness and Death in Graphic Novels.M. K. Czerwiec & Michelle N. Huang - 2017 - Journal of Medical Humanities 38 (2):95-113.
    Non-fiction graphic novels about illness and death created by patients and their loved ones have much to teach all readers. However, the bond of empathy made possible in the comic form may have special lessons for healthcare providers who read these texts and are open to the insights they provide.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  12
    Selling Hospice.Sam Halabi - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (4):442-454.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33. Hospice Narratives of Good Dying.Ellen McGee - 1997 - Bioethics Forum 13 (3):36-40.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  8
    Hospice Care as an Alternative to Euthanasia.Robert J. Miller - 1992 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (1-2):127-132.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  35.  12
    Hospice Care as an Alternative to Euthanasia.Robert J. Miller - 1992 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (1-2):127-132.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  36.  22
    Ethical Decision-Making in Hospice Care.A. Walker & C. Breitsameter - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (3):321-330.
  37.  38
    Hospice and Physician-Assisted Death: Collaboration, Compliance, and Complicity.Courtney S. Campbell & Jessica C. Cox - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (5):26-35.
  38.  17
    Variation in Patients' Hospice Costs.Haiden A. Huskamp, Joseph P. Newhouse, Jessica Cafarella Norcini & Nancy L. Keating - 2008 - Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing 45 (2):232-244.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  19
    Conflicts of Conscience Hospice and Assisted Suicide.Courtney S. Campbell, Jan Hare & Pam Matthews - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (3):36.
  40.  17
    Cpr in Hospice/Commentary.Perry G. Fine & Bruce Jennings - 2003 - Hastings Center Report 33 (3).
  41.  15
    AIDS Homecare and Hospice in San Francisco: A Model for Compassionate Care.Marcy A. Fraser & Jerilyn Hesse - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
  42.  13
    Pictures of Persons and the Good of Hospice Care.Hilde Lindemann Nelson - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  14
    How Medicare Is Altering the Hospice Movement.David S. Greer & Vincent Mor - 1985 - Hastings Center Report 15 (5):5-9.
  44.  11
    2.2 “I Rather Talk About Football”. A Study on Lifeworld in a Hospice Ward (Lisbeth Thoresen).Lisbeth Thoresen - 2010 - In Trygve Wyller & Hans-Günter Heimbrock (eds.), Perceiving the Other: Case Studies and Theories of Respectful Action. Oxbow [Distributor]. pp. 41.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. The Two-Faced Angel: Do Phase I Clinical Trials Have a Place in Modern Hospice?Daniel S. Ross - 2006 - Penn Bioethics Journal 2 (2):46.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  51
    Anti‐Infective Therapy at End of Life: Ethical Decision‐Making in Hospice‐Eligible Patients.Paul J. Ford, Thomas G. Fraser, Mellar P. Davis & Eric Kodish - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (4):379-392.
  47.  14
    The American Way of Hospice.David H. Smith & Judith A. Granbois - 1982 - Hastings Center Report 12 (2):8-10.
  48.  5
    Case Study: CPR in Hospice.Perry G. Fine & Bruce Jennings - 2003 - Hastings Center Report 33 (3):9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. Making Hospice Space.Ken Worpole - 2010 - In Jennifer Lorna Hockey, Carol Komaromy & Kate Woodthorpe (eds.), The Matter of Death: Space, Place and Materiality. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 35--51.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  14
    Practicing Spiritual Care in the Japanese Hospice.Timothy O. Benedict - 2018 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 45 (1).
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 164