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  1.  2
    Aeneid 3. 635–7.Howard Jacobson - 2008 - Classical Quarterly 58 (2):698-.
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  2.  3
    Aeneid 12.570–1.Howard Jacobson - 2004 - Classical Quarterly 54 (02):636-.
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  3.  15
    Aeneid 4.622–3.Howard Jacobson - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (01):313-.
    R. G. Austin's translation of these famous imprecations of Dido's seems to me perfectly representative, ‘and then do you, my Tyrians, hound with hate and hate again all his stock and all his race to be’. I see no strong arguments against such an interpretation of this sentence, but I think that an alternative—and very different—understanding of these words is likely.
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  4.  1
    Aeneid 1.567–8.Howard Jacobson - 2004 - Classical Quarterly 54 (1):299-300.
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  5.  5
    Aeneid 1.647–55.Howard Jacobson - 2005 - Classical Quarterly 55 (02):650-652.
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  6.  27
    Asherah and Aphrodite: A coincidence?Howard Jacobson - 2015 - Classical Quarterly 65 (1):355-356.
    It has long been known that there is a significant connection between Aphrodite and Semitic goddesses. In Walter Burkert's recent words, ‘Behind the figure of Aphrodite there clearly stands the ancient Semitic goddess of love, Ishtar-Astarte.’ This was already recognized by Herodotus and Philo of Byblos. I want here to note a curious and striking item of connection that has not been noticed.
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  7.  10
    Artapanus and the flooding of the nile.Howard Jacobson - 2006 - Classical Quarterly 56 (02):602-.
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  8.  9
    Apuleiana II.Howard Jacobson - 2007 - Classical Quarterly 57 (02):796-800.
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  9.  5
    Horatiana.Howard Jacobson - 1987 - Classical Quarterly 37 (02):524-.
    There is nothing that renders this punctuation and the standard understanding of these verses impossible. Parallels can certainly be found . It is however true that this ellipse of seu has no good parallel in the Odes and the two examples in the Satires are much easier to tolerate than the use here. Thus, it may be worth noting that a different view of the verse seems possible. Remove the comma from line 16 and take tollere with maior: ‘than whom (...)
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  10.  2
    Homeric Iphigeneia.Howard Jacobson - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (01):296-.
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  11.  8
    Horace's Maeonian Song.Howard Jacobson - 1987 - American Journal of Philology 108 (4).
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  12.  6
    Homer, Odyssey 17.221.Howard Jacobson - 1999 - Classical Quarterly 49 (01):315-.
    In the discussions and debates about the precise nature of Melanthios’ abuse of Eumaios and Odysseus at Od. 17.215–32 and especially the meaning of μoλoβρóν at 219, an important point appears to have been missed.
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  13.  10
    Homer, Odyssey 1.132–3.Howard Jacobson - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (01):290-.
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  14.  12
    Horace's voladictory: Carm. 2.20.Howard Jacobson - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (02):573-.
    ‘It is not likely that anything absolutely new can be added to the interpretation of this familiar poem.’ So G. L. Hendrickson forty five years ago. It need scarcely be noted that in spite of these cautionary words much has been written on this ode in the intervening years. With hesitation I add here a few words on what seems to me an overlooked yet central aspect of this poem.
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  15.  7
    Iliad 7.293ff.Howard Jacobson - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (01):292-.
    Wordplay involving names is routine in Homer. Less common, but not rare, is wordplay that does not have anything to do with names. Thus, at Iliad 1.290f. there is a play on ; at 24.611 an implicit play on / ; at Odyssey 12.45–46 a possible play on.
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  16.  16
    Julius Valerius 1.36 and Auxiliary Habeo.Howard Jacobson - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (02):584-.
    In the Res Gestae Alexandri of Julius Valerius, the manuscripts at 1.36 read Tyrum enim proteri mox pedibus haberi principis respondere. The use of habeo with infinitive as a virtual equivalent of the future tense is common in late Latin. Thielmann emended our text to read habere and is followed by the standard critical edition and by TLL. “Can haberi be defended? We ought to remember that auxiliary verbs are often ‘attracted’ into the passive when the dependent infinitive is passive, (...)
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  17.  1
    Lucretius 1. 102–105.Howard Jacobson - 1982 - Classical Quarterly 32 (01):237-.
    Bailey posed the problem succinctly and clearly: ‘Though you can be said to “fashion a dream for yourself”, it is not easy to see how you can do it for someone else.’ He agrees with Giussani: somnia = ineptae fabulae, which is unexceptionable. But in fact Bailey's objection to the ‘literal’ meaning of the text is baseless. Dream control was indeed practised in antiquity.
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  18.  1
    Medea 1250: δυστυχη`ς δ’ έγω` γυνή.Howard Jacobson - 2004 - Classical Quarterly 54 (1):274-274.
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  19.  4
    Misor in Philo of Byblos.Howard Jacobson - 2002 - Classical Quarterly 52 (1):404-404.
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  20.  7
    Philo, Lucretius, and Anima.Howard Jacobson - 2004 - Classical Quarterly 54 (2):635-636.
  21.  10
    Pseudo-acro on Horace, carm. 1.1.35–6.Howard Jacobson - 2012 - Classical Quarterly 62 (1):435-.
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  22.  6
    Ritualistic Formulae In Greek Dramatic Texts.Howard Jacobson - 1982 - Classical Quarterly 32 (01):233-.
    Ritualistic formulae and acts pervade the political, legal, societal and religious life of the ancient world. In many instances there are striking similarities between the formulae of the Greco-Roman world and those of the Near East. Often illumination exists from one to the other. Here I wish to notice a few passages in Greek drama where I think such illumination is possible.
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  23.  4
    Ritualistic Formulae In Greek Dramatic Texts.Howard Jacobson - 1982 - Classical Quarterly 32 (1):233-234.
    Ritualistic formulae and acts pervade the political, legal, societal and religious life of the ancient world. In many instances there are striking similarities between the formulae of the Greco-Roman world and those of the Near East. Often illumination exists from one to the other. Here I wish to notice a few passages in Greek drama where I think such illumination is possible.
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  24.  2
    Shorter notes.Howard Jacobson - 2005 - Classical Quarterly 55 (2):650-652.
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  25.  8
    Two conjectures in Horace, Odes.Howard Jacobson - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (02):582-.
    I offer here two emendations of the text of the Odes, in two passages that make perfectly good sense, offer Latin that is unexceptionable, and have apparently never been questioned.
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  26.  3
    The oath of the Delian League.Howard Jacobson - 1975 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 119 (1-2):256-258.
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  27.  10
    Two textual notes on theodotus.Howard Jacobson - 2007 - Classical Quarterly 57 (01):302-.
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  28.  15
    Vergil, Aeneid 5.458–60.Howard Jacobson - 1999 - Classical Quarterly 49 (01):329-330.
    It appears to have gone unnoticed that the simile used by Vergil at Aeneid 5.458–60 was appropriated by him from Apollonius Rhodius.
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  29.  14
    Violets and violence: two notes.Howard Jacobson - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (01):314-.
    Servius was surely not the first to show discomfort with Vergil's choice of the word violaverit. Observing that the simile in lines 67–8 derives from Homer , he seems to be apologizing for Vergil when he explains that the poet's violaverit translates Homer's νινη. And discomfort there should be. The notion of ‘tainting, spoiling, damaging, defiling’ that violare should carry seems out of place both for the ivory-image and for the picture of the beautiful girl. Modern commentators have been no (...)
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  30.  10
    Vergil's Dido and Euripides' Helen.Howard Jacobson - 1987 - American Journal of Philology 108 (1).
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